or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Trade in Yours
For a £0.25 Gift Card
Trade in
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
I’d like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Popular Religion in Late Saxon England: Elf Charms in Context [Paperback]

Karen Louise Jolly
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
RRP: £29.50
Price: £27.81 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: £1.69 (6%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 21 Sep.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover --  
Paperback £27.81  
Trade In this Item for up to £0.25
Trade in Popular Religion in Late Saxon England: Elf Charms in Context for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.25, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Book Description

31 Dec 1996
In tenth- and eleventh-century England, Anglo-Saxon Christians retained an old folk belief in elves as extremely dangerous creatures capable of harming unwary humans. To ward off the afflictions caused by these invisible beings, Christian priests modified traditional elf charms by adding liturgical chants to herbal remedies. In Popular Religion in Late Saxon England, Karen Jolly traces this cultural intermingling of Christian liturgy and indigenous Germanic customs and argues that elf charms and similar practices represent the successful Christianization of native folklore. Jolly describes a dual process of conversion in which Anglo-Saxon culture became Christianized but at the same time left its own distinct imprint on Christianity. Illuminating the creative aspects of this dynamic relationship, she identifies liturgical folk medicine as a middle ground between popular and elite, pagan and Christian, magic and miracle. Her analysis, drawing on the model of popular religion to redefine folklore and magic, reveals the richness and diversity of late Saxon Christianity.


Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press (31 Dec 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807845655
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807845653
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 15.8 x 1.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 173,372 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Provides unique and valuable insights into popular culture in late Saxon England."Speculum"

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
Consider the following ceremony for blessing the fields, found on a few folios from the late tenth or early eleventh century, and ponder the contexts in which it was developed, performed, and written. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
the book is great, you see, cause it's informative and incredibly detailed. It's obvious much work went into the book, and that much research was done. The book, however, isn't for those just starting out in the field of charms and magic... you should have a little background before reading the book. It's more for the historical reader then just any plain person... details on spells are also found in the book. Just plain great.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.8 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent and needed scholarship 7 Nov 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Karen Jolly has produced a wonderful source of information on Anglo-Saxon charms. She makes a powerful case for the charms as elements of Anglo-Saxon popular religion, and explodes many of the myths of a pagan/Christian dichotomy that flooded the field during the age of patristic readings, and that have returned under the guise of neo-paganism in our own popular culture. One cannot claim to be a scholar of the Anglo-Saxon charms without having read this book.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting look at Anglo-Saxon religion 7 Dec 2011
By DRCarlson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Not as mind blowing as 'Elves in Anglo-Saxon England', but an interesting book none the less. I like the more accurate translations of some of the same texts in Alaric Hall's book better. Also the emphasis on christianity is not as interesting to me, although I like how she shows the difference between 'popular' religion, the world of the folk, and that it was quite different from what the Bishops and Reformers believed was going on. Also how she points out the 'privileged' view of things was not necessarily what was really going on. The Middle Ages was not really the Age Of Faith that we all think it was, At least in the British Isles, most people were barely christian till well into the early modern era.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sure to be a classic 8 Feb 2009
By Christopher R. Travers - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
In this work, Karen Jolly uses the Elf Charms from the Lacnunga and Bald's Leechbook as a window into popular religion in late Anglo-Saxon England, The book provides a great deal of information on the elf-charms themselves, but its significance goes well beyond that.

The full value of Jolly's work is found through the way she explores Anglo-Saxon popular religion, the process of conversion to Christianity, and tensions between formal and popular religion, and the tensions between magical and religious elements. This is a far more important work than the title suggests, and I would highly recommend it to anyone interested in Anglo-Saxon times.
9 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very interesting book.... keeps you turning pages 1 Jan 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
the book is great, you see, cause it's informative and incredibly detailed. It's obvious much work went into the book, and that much research was done. The book, however, isn't for those just starting out in the field of charms and magic... you should have a little background before reading the book. It's more for the historical reader then just any plain person... details on spells are also found in the book. Just plain great
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback