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Pop Went the Pirates: History of Offshore Radio Stations Paperback – Mar 1994


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Product details

  • Paperback: 230 pages
  • Publisher: Lambs' Meadow Publications (Mar 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0907398030
  • ISBN-13: 978-0907398035
  • Product Dimensions: 24.6 x 17.2 x 3.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 496,133 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

This outstanding volume is the product of 30 years painstaking research by the author, who has been involved in sound broadcasting throughout the period. The informative text is fully illustrated with 230 black and white photographs.

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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By jeffrey.a.clarke@btinternet.com on 29 Sep 1999
As a life-long radio enthusiast who heard Radio Carolines early days, from the Bell through the voyage to become Caroline North, and listening to the empty hiss of the radio after the close down of Big L on 14th August 1967 whilst at work (I was a GPO engineer at that time),I found Keith Skues book both readable and interesting, an excellent work.
Two interesting things stick in my mind: Tony Benn's sensible assertion that "The people who ran the stations were not criminals but business men who had found a loophole in the law," (this as a backdrop to the authorities later hysteria about shutting down the pirates) and the conclusion of former Caroline DJ Paul Graham which is also the conclusion of the book that "pirate radio has had its day.....Long may it rest in peace!"
A lot of the information about offshore activities after 14 August 1967 was new to me. Although I remember Johnnie Walker broadcasting after midnight that night and later listening to Radio NorthSea International, the many and various other attempts to repeat the success of the heydays of broadcasting to the UK was an interesting and I guess later somewhat sad closing section of the book.
I enjoyed hearing about the people who worked on the stations and what they are doing now. Sometimes I wasn't quite sure when the "now" was in some places: 1967, 1968 or 1994?
Overall a great book for not just Anoraks - but also the many people who got a great deal of pleasure from three short years when we all realised that the Light Programme was gone forever!!
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 26 Feb 1999
I have read this book from cover to cover, and enjoyed every minute of it. It is the definitive work on offshore radio - or pirate radio as it is probably better known. Written from the inside, during the heyday of the pirates, with carefully researched historical and subsequent events, it both informs and entertains. There is a comprehensive section on the stars of pirate radio, where they came from, and where they went, and the book follows through to the "present day" offshore stations of its publication date. There are many photographs and quotations, and much information about how the programs and schedules were put together. The book is carefully cross-referenced, and provides a wonderful insight into the development of modern broadcasting (including the political shenanigans surrounding the MEBO Act), and the lives of those involved "at the sharp end". The author is still broadcasting to a similar geographical audience, and much interest is still shown in the pirate era. Without their influence it is doubtful we would have the rich diversity of radio available today. This book would make an excellent gift for anyone in their mid-40s to 50s who had any interest in radio during their younger days. It can be dipped into, or read straight through: it is equally at home on a library shelf as a coffee table, but above all it will answer all those questions you wanted to ask way back when.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Mr. R. S. Clancy on 23 Jan 2005
Verified Purchase
This book is a must for all Offshore Pirate Radio listeners,the author has first hand accounts of all that went on in the early day's of 60's Offshore Radio.The up's and down's of being a Pirate DeeJay is brought to life by the authors diary of his time on one of the biggest of the Offshore Radio Stations Radio London(Big Lil),his accounts of all that happened with the 60's Offshore Pirates is painstakely re-created in print in this book.This book took over 40 years to come into being and the author has updated his own fact files to include the 70's,80's & 90's events to bring his book bang upto date,so what are you waiting for!!!.Buy this book and own a slice of HISTORY by a RESPECTED BROADCASTER.
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