Pompeii 2014

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Set in the days leading up to the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius, a slave on a ship heading for Naples works to get home to save the woman he loves and his best friend, a gladiator trapped inside the city's coliseum.

Starring:
Kit Harington, Emily Browning
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray, Blu-ray 3D

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature to_be_announced
Runtime 1 hour 44 minutes
Starring Kit Harington, Emily Browning, Kiefer Sutherland
Director Paul W.S. Anderson
Genres Romance
Studio E1 Films
Rental release 15 September 2014
Main languages English
Discs
  • Feature to_be_announced
Runtime 1 hour 44 minutes
Starring Kit Harington, Emily Browning, Kiefer Sutherland
Director Paul W.S. Anderson
Genres Romance
Studio E1 Films
Rental release 15 September 2014
Main languages English
Discs
  • Feature to_be_announced
Runtime 1 hour 44 minutes
Starring Kit Harington, Emily Browning, Kiefer Sutherland
Director Paul W.S. Anderson
Genres Romance
Studio E1 Films
Rental release 15 September 2014
Main languages English

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
This item has not been released yet and is not eligible to be reviewed.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Anthony J. Bond on 11 May 2014
Format: Blu-ray
I saw this film at the cinema yesterday and enjoyed it so much that I've now ordered it from Amazon. I disagree with the negative reviews here and can only say that I found the acting perfectly adequate, the script workmanlike, the music outstanding, the costumes and staging impressive, the gladiatorial scenes sufficiently violent and credible and the special effects of the volcano's eruption highly convincing. I am not a scholar of Roman history so cannot say to what extent the film is faithful to the facts, but this is supposed to be entertainment not a history lesson and, to that extent, it succeeds exceptionally well. One reviewer criticizes the film for supposedly showing the gladiators' arena being destroyed by the volcano whereas, in fact, it survives to this day but, in fact, the film only shows it being damaged by the eruption, not destroyed as alleged, so it is faithful to the facts in this respect. I saw this film after it had run at our cinema for a week, yet the auditorium was full to near capacity, which would not have been the case if it had been damned by word of mouth. The only reason I am not awarding the film five stars is because -as can be seen from the posters- the actor portraying the leading male character is no Russel Crowe -he's too young for the role, sports a tousle of hair more reminiscent of the 1970s than the Roman period and quite frankly, looks like a biceps-challenged wimp out of physical scale with the manly gladiators and Roman soldiers he too easily dispatches in battle. You can't have everything.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bill Mason on 21 July 2014
Format: Blu-ray
I watched this movie at the cinema with my 11 year old daughter, and it was an enjoyable enough flick in the style of Gladiator (Ridley Scott/Russell Crowe). This movie is basically a love story between a slave named Milo, who possesses formidable fighting skills (think Russell Crowe in Gladiator), and a beautiful noblewoman, Cassia. Kit Harrington (famous as a result of his role in Game of Thrones) has the lead in this sword and sandals epic, and makes the most of a role which is taken over by the CGI in the second half of the movie. He is made a Roman slave and taken to the arenas of Pompeii, during which he becomes romantically involved with Cassia. Cassia's father, a Roman general named Corvus (played with a toe-curling English accent by the fish out of water Keifer Sutherland), disapproves of his daughter's choice in men, and determines that Milo needs to be removed from Cassia's life. The last half hour of the movie, when the volcano erupts and the city is hit by a tsunami, is an impressive exercise in F/X. You watch Milo and Cassia fight for survival against rivers of molten lava and the sea when it gets whipped up by the tsunami. Of course, the big final showdown is between Milo and Corvus, and I won't let slip how they resolve their differences. Keifer Sutherland is a great actor, but his attempt here at an English accent unfortunately lends an unintended comical aspect to the film. Kit Harrington is a solid if slightly uninspiring hero, reminiscent perhaps of L.A. Law's Harry Hamlin in the original Clash of the Titans. Suffice to say, the film has its drawbacks, with just a little too much hokum to let you keep a straight face.Read more ›
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Kirsty Grant on 26 May 2014
Format: DVD
To start off, I thoroughly enjoyed Pomepeii, which is what I film is supposed to do. I am also a student studying ancient history and classical archeology, so I feel like I have a right to comment on the accuracy of the film, unlike many of the negative reviews on here.

The film makers perfectly recreated the city of Pompeii based on photography they took from the remains of the town, so A+ for going the extra mile as far as I'm concerned! The 3D effects worked very well and I actually saw someone in the cinema duck out the way from flaming debris!

The acting was very good and I'm very pleased with the casting choice. I also like the opening scene set in Britannia, showing the origins of the main male protagonist Milo. The story line was a bit predictable, but over all still enjoyable.

As far as accuracy is concerned, it's a Hollywood film. Of course it's not going to be completely accurate. Get over it. The film makers exaggerated the effects of the volcano to highlight the disaster and make a more dramatic film. In truth, only about 2000 people out of 20,000 died in Pompeii. Whereas in the film it looks like everyone does. The also combined the devastation of Herculaneum and Pomepeii, again, to make a more dramatic film.

All in all I loved it and would definitely recommend it to friends. And to those who insist on moaning about the accuracy: go and watch a documentary, not a film.
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25 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Marshall Lord TOP 500 REVIEWER on 5 May 2014
Format: Blu-ray
This review is based on having watched "Pompeii" in the cinema in 3D with my wife and son.

If the acting talent and skilfully-created effects which went into this film had been combined with a well written plot, something like a film adaptation of Robert Harris's novel "Pompeii," it would have been a classic. Instead the storyline was simplistic, full of cliches, and a travesty of history. The acting skill and effort which the cast put into this film deserved to be part of a better end product.

The film begins with images representing the statue-like casts which are all that remains of victims of the disaster at Pompeii. Such casts were made by modern archaeologists who poured plaster into hollows in the ash left by the bodies of unfortunate residents of Pompeii and Herculaneum who were killed and entombed by the volcanic eruption which devastated those cities in 79AD.

Superimposed on the images of those casts are quotations from the real historical letters about the disaster written to the historian Tacitus by Pliny the Younger, an eyewitness himself and nephew of the Roman fleet commander (Pliny the Elder) who died while leading rescue efforts. It's a powerful start and in some ways the best bit of the film. Unfortunately it mostly goes downhill from there.

The hero of the film is the last survivor of a Celtish tribe from northern Britain, famed for their skill with horses, who had been exterminated by the Romans in AD62 for rebelling against the empire. Having watched his entire family cut down, a young boy is taken as a slave to Londinium where he is subsequently trained as a gladiator and becomes known as "The Celt.
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