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Point Of Departure (The Rudy Van Gelder Edition)
 
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Point Of Departure (The Rudy Van Gelder Edition)

6 May 1999 | Format: MP3

9.42 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 8.99 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
12:16
30
2
7:05
30
3
9:47
30
4
4:18
30
5
6:45
30
6
6:13
30
7
3:49
30
8
7:03


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 6 May 1999
  • Release Date: 6 May 1999
  • Label: Blue Note Records
  • Copyright: (C) 1999 Blue Note Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 57:16
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001JNPMS2
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 128,096 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By William Burn VINE VOICE on 1 Feb 2006
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
History has been singularly unfair to Andrew Hill. He released several albums during the 1960s, but quickly thereafter faded into obscurity when he found no more funding to produce more records. However, this one disc is enough to mark him as a bandleader of great originality and imagination, and a composer of rare talent.
The band itself is very similar to that which recorded Eric Dolphy's masterpiece "Out to Lunch", but this session is by no means a simple rehash of those principles. The compositions are as far removed from Tin Pan Alley as Dolphy's, but they seem more immediately cohesive, and (though this be sacreligous to say as much), less wearing on the ear. The playing is terrific througout, especially from the 18-year-old Tony Williams, who is given great freedom to twist and turn the beat which Hill holds steady. Joe Henderson deserves, in my opinion, greater acclaim for being a geniunely distinctive tenor voice during the 1960s when placed next to Coltrane, and Eric Dolphy provides exhilarating alto solos.
This isn't run-of the mill jazz by any means, but it is a first-rate band playing really special music. Buy it.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By hj on 16 Nov 2005
Format: Audio CD
Routinely listed as one of the top 20 modern jazz albums of the 60s, the secret of “Point of Departure” (1964) lies in its unique line up of diverse geniuses, including bop trumpet veteran Kenny Dorham, post-bop sax heavyweight Joe Henderson, maverick pianist & auteur Hill, avant garde hero Eric Dolphy, and not forgetting Miles’ young drum god Tony Williams. For years this was the only Andrew Hill album I owned or knew. I thought (& I’m sure I’m not alone in this) that it was basically an Eric Dolphy album, a companion piece to “Out To Lunch” (recorded for Blue Note a month earlier with same rhythm section) – one of several Dolphy albums inexplicably credited to sidemen. Having now become acquainted with this excellent series of reissues from Andrew Hill’s 1960s Blue Note catalogue, I realise that Hill is definitely THE presiding genius here. Without his immaculate, if challenging, compositions and his facility for detailed arrangements, the other assembled geniuses/madmen would have probably descended into ill-matched chaos.
If you have an old scratchy vinyl version it’s worth considering upgrading to this CD reissue: it has three bonus alternate takes – that’s 20 minutes or so extra music from the original sessions.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By N. Jones on 16 Oct 2010
Format: Audio CD
It's certainly true that Andrew Hill compiled one of the most individual bodies of composition in jazz, but the fact that he did might distract attention from the fact that he was also a singularly talented pianist.

That thought sprang to mind while this reviewer was listening to "Refuge" again for the purpose of writing this review. The piece is dark-hued and harmonically ambiguous anyway, but in the course of Hill's piano solo it becomes almost arrhythmic, such is the highly individual nature of his work. Indeed it could with some justification be argued that Tony Williams was one of the few drummers around at the time able to gel with Hill's extraordinary vision. For all the differences in their respective musical approaches Eric Dolphy -on alto sax on this one- fits right in too, but then his take on what might be called the post-bop continuum was also distinctively his own.

On the surface of it the melody statement of "Spectrum" sounds like organised chaos, but closer listening reveals an elliptical order which might -just might- have been worked out down to the last detail. It could easily have been the case that trumpeter Kenny Dorham, a one-time Charlie Parker sideman, might have been out of his depth in this even newer music, but as it is his contributions are as far out as anything happening in this piece. If the fates had worked out in a different way he might have got some of those dates -Dolphy's "Out To Lunch" for example- which in reality fell to Freddie Hubbard, a trumpeter who for all of his technical bravado wasn't always at home in music outside of the hard bop idiom he was such a persuasive advocate of.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 Jun 2001
Format: Audio CD
Almost the same band as the one on Eric Dolphy's Out to Lunch - but led by the pensive, individualistic pianist and composer Andrew Hill, and coloured lavishly by the imagination of the great tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson. There are elements of the same atonal experimentation and rhythmic splintering of Out to Lunch, but I think it's an even better, more accomplished album. There's a witty tribute to Monk called "New Monastery".
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