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Pocket Symphony
 
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Pocket Symphony

Air
19 Feb. 2007 | Format: MP3

£5.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £4.27 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Sàrl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
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Product details

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
I've read all the other reviews of Air,s new album Pocket Symphony, and its obvious that there are two camps of opinion. No it's not Moon Safari, or the brilliant Talkie Walkie, but it's still a good album in its own right. After all talented artists need to move on. We don't continuously want re-makes of Moon Safari do we? (surely).

Pocket Symphony is a lot more melancholy and sombre, and doesn't have any lighter tracks to break it up, and therefore each track tends to blend into the next. In which case it becomes more ambient, musical wallpaper than an album of stand out tracks, But that's OK.

However sometimes I feel Air know exactly what they're doing, I mean ...you can just imagine advertising companies and Sophia Coppola on the phone right now.

There are a couple of guest appearances as well. Jarvis Cocker mumbles through "One hell of a party" sounding like he has the mother of all hangovers. Neil Hannon on "Somewhere between waking and sleeping", but JB Dunckel still gives the best performance vocal wise.

Not the best album to date, and in summery...I think maybe one problem with this album, is there are no real stand out tracks, and therefore doesn't really take you anywhere. It's probably best played as back ground more than anything...definitely not a driving CD!

I'm personally giving it 4 stars, because although its not what Air fans may have expected, its still a good album in it's own right, which I'm sure that given the chance it will grow on you, as it has me.
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Format: Audio CD
Now almost 10 years since the classic Moon Safari was released, Monsieurs Dunckel and Godin once again emerge from their Parisian bunker with another slice of Gallic-tinged soundscapes, whispy melodies and movie-like operatics.

Pocket Symphony is AIR's fourth `proper' album but unlike their criminally underrated prog experiment 10,000hz Legend and the slightly disappointing follow-up Talkie Walkie, this album has more in common with their motion picture soundtrack to Sofia Coppola's The Virgin Suicides.

For the uninitiated Pocket Symphony might be difficult to like. There's none of the duo's breezy melodies of Moon Safari or the hard electronic stylings of 10,000hz. Indeed, there isn't even a hint of a `radio-friendly' track so forget anything as catchy as Cherry Blossom Girl here. Pocket Symphony is slow and stately, melancholy and sombre. Like most of AIR's output, it's upon repeated listenings that this album really starts to weave it's magic. This is an album that demands you invest time to explore it's sparse but somehow lush world.

Common person Jarvis Cocker and The Divine Comedy's Neil Hannon provide guest vocals on One Hell of a Party and Somewhere Between Waking and Sleeping, injecting both tracks with plenty of downbeat, weary understatement.

Pocket Symphony will probably appease fans desperate for new material but it may be just too impenetrable for newcomers. It's a fine album no doubt, although it certainly isn't easy.
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By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 17 Mar. 2007
Format: Audio CD
Air can be relied on to stick to a signature sound -- lush and dreamlike -- and still be able to wedge in a bit of new material.

In the case of "Pocket Symphony," they stick pretty much to the same formula as their previous release, "Talkie Walkie" -- sweet, slightly symphonic electropop that sounds like something to dream to Yeah, same ol'. Yet somehow that does't interfere with the enjoyability of this pretty, satiny music.

It opens with a hollow tapping and a soft acoustic riff melted into a piano melody. By the time the soft waves of synth kick in, the little melody is quietly hypnotic, as it expands into a shimmering little piano-synth epic... only to coil back up into its piano melody and hollow drumming.

That's "Space Maker," and it's only the warmup for the remaining songs. Air trips softly through a series of songs that are mainly gentle electropop, but with a few classical flourishes sprinkled throughout it. Piano, strings and a bit of horn all make their way into the music.

And they manage a few odd twists, which break the music out of its somnolent sound, and keep it from sounding monotonous -- rippling piano laced with twinkly synth, twisty synthpop, glitchy balladry, and an acoustic ballad or two with some soft keyboard. They even have the spare, twangy Asian-inspired sound of "One Hell of a Party."

Basically, "Pocket Symphony" has Air's trademark sound, which hasn't change substantially since the less soothing electronics of "10,000hz Legend," but they can spice it up with some unexpected twists and new sounds. Not a huge surprise, but very beautiful and soothing nonetheless.

The music itself is a shimmering weave of instrumentation and synth.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
It seems that every alternate AIR album is a good one. Talkie Walkie was a lovely album but Pocket Symphony leaves me cold. There are perhaps around three tracks on this that are good - Once Upon a Time, Photograph and Night Sight are standouts, but the collaborations are pretty dire with Jarvis Cocker's Party getting my vote for weakest effort on this album.

My advice would be to save your money on this one and go out and buy Charlotte Gainsbourg's 5:55 album, which was written and produced by AIR, and is more of a melodical AIR effort than this patchy piece of work.
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