Quantity:1

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£19.50
& FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Sold by: Eco Power Shop
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Plug-In Power and Energy Monitor

| 9 answered questions

Price: £16.95 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
In stock.
Sold by EnergyMonitorWorld and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
2 new from £16.95

Save on DIY Projects in Tools & Home Improvement Save on DIY Projects in Tools & Home Improvement


Frequently Bought Together

Plug-In Power and Energy Monitor + NEW!!! Owl + USB Connectivity CM160 Energy Saving Wireless Power Electricity Smart Monitor
Price For Both: £59.90

Buy the selected items together

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Product Information

Technical Details
Part Number SEC0956407
Item Weight222 g
Product Dimensions15 x 8.6 x 7 cm
Item model numberSEC0956407
Item Package Quantity1
  
Additional Information
ASINB000Q7PJGW
Best Sellers Rank 563 in DIY & Tools (See top 100)
Shipping Weight222 g
Delivery Destinations:Visit the Delivery Destinations Help page to see where this item can be delivered.
Date First Available3 May 2007
  
Feedback
 

Look for similar items by category


Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

387 of 394 people found the following review helpful By Howard Wright on 21 Sep 2008
Verified Purchase
This energy and power monitor does what it says and does it pretty well. I tried two different plug-in meters and this one was by far the best.

I didn't bother with any of the devices that are attached to the live cable next to the house's main electricity meter, as these can't measure actual power consumed (i.e. what you're billed for). Only plug-in meters can give you an accurate measure of this, though of course you can't use them to directly measure e.g. showers or cookers as they don't have a plug (with a little effort though, you can use the meter to work out how much energy one revolution of your normal electricity meter corresponds to, which you can then use to measure consumption for items like showers that don't have a plug).

The meter is able to measure low currents and low powers fairly well, so low-consumption appliances or devices on standby can be measured accurately (unlike the other meter I tried: Power & Energy Monitor by Brennenstuhl). It measures current (A), actual power (W), apparent power (W), power factor, total energy (kWh) and usage time, and you can view any of these values within one or two button presses (some buttons toggle between two measures). The usage time measured doesn't depend on the current drawn by the appliance you're measuring, so for fridges/freezers that switch on and off, you see the total usage time which makes it easy to work out typical (average) power consumed.

The meter doesn't have batteries, so you have to read the measurements while it's plugged in.
Read more ›
8 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
78 of 79 people found the following review helpful By I. Harris on 21 July 2009
Verified Purchase
For anyone wondering, this is a Prodigit 2000MU, and the full data sheet can be found by doing a web search for "2000MU data sheet" (Sorry, Amazon won't allow me to post a direct link!).

This unit is less convenient to use than others on the market, mainly due to the lack of an internal battery, which means you need to be able to see the socket you're monitoring. On the other hand, it's significantly more accurate than competing units, particularly at low currents (important if you're interested in just how much those devices on standby are actually costing). It boasts a typical measurement error of just 0.5%, which is excellent. To put that in perspective, a similarly priced competitor claims 1.5%, and the very whizzy, (and, at three times the price, very expensive) Efergy E2 manages a dismal "<8%", despite being "wireless everything" and providing pretty graphs on your PC etc etc.

I decided that basic accuracy was more important to me than flashy features, and have no regrets for choosing this product.

The unit I purchased from EnergyMonitorWorld was supplied with a Maplin Electronics sticker.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
72 of 74 people found the following review helpful By Alex MacPhee on 18 Jan 2012
Verified Purchase
Conscious of rapidly rising energy prices, and wanting to cut costs, I was skeptical of the suggestion that I could save more by changing my usage patterns, than by changing my supplier on one of those price comparison web sites.

I am glad I didn't hold on to that mistake for too long. Instead, I bought this electricity monitor to look at which appliances were the biggest drain on my income, and it has been a revelation.

There are two kinds of electricity monitor : one that measures total household consumption, and one that measures consumption of individual appliances. This monitor is of the second type. Using it is simple : plug it in to a wall socket, then plug the appliance in to it in turn. The LCD will display a range of measurements by pushing an appropriate button, including voltage, wattage, current draw, and perhaps most usefully, consumption in kiloWattHours. It also has a clock display to tell you how long the appliance has been connected. These different displays are useful for different kinds of appliance ; for example, some take electricity as long as they are connected and in use, such as a vacuum cleaner or steam iron or fridge, others use a certain amount of electricity for a fixed job, such as a washing machine or kettle or toaster, which have automatic switch off.

Using the monitor, it becomes easy to estimate the cost of running any appliance, either per job or per hour, and in this way you can build up a table or, in my case, a spreadsheet, of every appliance in the household, for analysing usage patterns and costs. I now know how much it costs to run my kettle, iron, toaster, grill, oven, laundry, computer, printers, radios, television, Sky box, freezer, aquarium, in short, everything.
Read more ›
8 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
98 of 103 people found the following review helpful By Manzoku on 7 Jan 2009
Verified Purchase
I've had one of the other meters (a Brennenestuhl) for 3 years, and was puzzled when it reported the standby power of my new Sony TV as 11.85 Watts, with a power factor (cos Phi) of 1.0. Sony say the standby power is 0.7 Watts, and I'm sure Trading Standards would be on to them quite quickly if the true figure was so wildly different.

I bought one of these Plug-In Power and Energy Monitor Meters after reading the other reviews (thank you, Howard Wright), and was not too surprised when it gave a reading of 1 Watt for the Sony TV (readings are to the nearest Watt). A pretty good example of the difference between 'precision' and 'accuracy' - 11.85 Watts is very precise but hopelessly inaccurate. 1 Watt is not very precise but is accurate enough to be useful.

There were similar huge discrepancies between the two meters with other appliances drawing small amounts of power (but which can add up).

It may not have a battery, and it's certainly awkward to read without an extension cord, but it's the best one available at the moment.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews