Playing for Change

Top Albums by Playing for Change



All downloads by Playing for Change
Sort by:
Bestselling
1-10 of 57
Song Title Album  
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.co.uk (UK).
  

Image of Playing for Change
Provided by the artist or their representative

Latest Tweet

playing4change

From Brazil to India - get ready to smile, dance, and feel the love of the world uniting through the power of music. http://t.co/J01Cx5ytkL


Biography

Mark Johnson is a man with a mission. He wants to bring the world together with music and build an organization that will use technology to enable people all over the world to play together, even if they are thousands of miles apart. Part of this vision was introduced to the world on Playing For Change – Songs Around The World; a CD/DVD set that featured the talents of hundreds of musicians from all over the globe. Johnson and his crew filmed and recorded dozens of musicians and spliced them together into videos that seamlessly blended their diverse styles into powerful performances. Formerly ... Read more

Mark Johnson is a man with a mission. He wants to bring the world together with music and build an organization that will use technology to enable people all over the world to play together, even if they are thousands of miles apart. Part of this vision was introduced to the world on Playing For Change – Songs Around The World; a CD/DVD set that featured the talents of hundreds of musicians from all over the globe. Johnson and his crew filmed and recorded dozens of musicians and spliced them together into videos that seamlessly blended their diverse styles into powerful performances. Formerly unknown street artists like Roger Ridley and Grandpa Elliot stood alongside stars like Bono and Manu Chau. The album made its debut at #10 on Billboard’s Pop Chart and became a worldwide sensation.

Playing For Change - Songs Around The World Part 2 is a continuation and evolution of our desire to present music to inspire the world,” Johnson says. “The journey of this album takes us from a village in Mali to the favelas (slums) of Brazil, from New Orleans to India, Jamaica to Japan. We stopped in 15 countries and recorded more than 150 musicians. One song, “Le Tierra del Olivido (Land of the Forgotten),” has over 80 people playing on it. There are new songs that were written for this album and the quality of our technology has improved.”

Like the other Playing For Change projects, Songs Around the World Part 2 was done on the fly. “We do rough mixes as we go, and a rough video mix as well. We made an album that you can put in your car and take the world for a ride and a DVD that will take you on a journey around the globe. This is a body of work that stands alone, integrating high quality audio and video. We integrate sounds and combinations of music that aren’t ordinarily put together. This is real world music, played from the heart. The musicians listen to the songs, then decide how they can make it sound better. They listen more and play less. That’s how we get so many musicians on a song and still hear every instrument, every voice. It’s really music with no ego.”

The music on Songs Around the World Part 2 is truly global, a dizzying mix of styles, cultures and rhythms. Baaba Maal’s arrangement of Bob Marley’s “Three Little Birds” has an African groove that’s complimented by rhythms from eight Brazilian percussionists, Keb’ Mo’s Delta blues guitar, trap drummer Courtney “Bam” Diedrick’s reggae backbeat and D. Chandrajit’s tabla. Tinariwen, a band of musicians from the deserts of Northern Mali incorporate American blues, African rhythms and Tuareg folk music, provide the driving pulse for Stevie Wonder’s “Higher Ground.” Tinariwen also form the back beat on their own “Groove in G” an improvisation that features Ag Alhabib’s electric guitar, Hiromitsu Agatsuma’s shamisen and a dozen Indian, African, Jamaican and Brazilian drummers and percussionists as well as subtle improvisations from sitar, veena and sarod players.

“Le Tierra del Olivido (Land of the Forgotten)” is a plea for peace from Columbia’s Carlos Vives that combines elements of vallenato, bambuco and salsa, with a hint of cumbia. The track includes 80 Columbian musicians and the 30 piece Orquesta Sinfonica Juvenil Batuta. Grandpa Elliot and Roger Ridley, the voices that made “Stand By Me” so compelling, sing a duet on Otis Redding’s “(Sitting on the) Dock of the Bay,” supported by Japanese blues superstar Char on lead guitar and the steel guitar of Italy’s Roberto Luti.

Hiromitsu Agatsuma’s shamisen and Congolese guitarist Jason Tamba introduce “Redemption Song,” featuring Steven Marley singing with his father. “We thought it would be nice to have Bob sing with one of his sons,” Johnson explains. “We took a performance from The Wailers’ last European tour and created a click track using Bob’s vocal. We asked the musicians to play this as if it were the last song they’d ever play in this life. You can feel that emotion come through on very single note. It ends the album with a feeling of forgiveness and hope.”

Playing For Change - Songs Around The World Part 2 is another moving document that shows the human family playing together showing all their colors, joys and hopes. It’s a cultural kaleidoscope that displays the best we have to offer each other.

Johnson’s vision doesn’t stop when the music’s over. “‘Stand by Me’ started with one man and a guitar and ended with the whole world singing together,” Johnson says. “That inspired the Playing For Change Foundation. We’re taking the money we make and funding music schools all over the world. They’ll be connected with video and audio links that will allow children all over the world to sing together. The Foundation’s first project, the Ntonga Music School in South Africa, opened in 2009. We also have three schools in Nepal and schools in Ghana, Mali and Rwanda where we’re working with genocide orphans who are already making music.”

To create the links between schools, Playing For Change is working with engineers from NASA. They want to offer third world countries the ability to connect with the outside world through the Internet. “We recently went to MIT in Boston with the NASA guys,” Johnson says. “We had Boston high school music students connect in real time to our school in South Africa. The kids were performing and interacting with each other and, at the end of the session, they were in love with each other. All prejudice was wiped away. That’s the motivation behind the PFC foundation.”

Mark Johnson remembers the day he decided to start the project that became Playing For Change. “I had an epiphany in a subway station,” Johnson recalls. “I heard music and saw two monks playing on the platform. They were painted white and wearing robes. One was playing a nylon guitar, the other was singing in a language I didn’t understand. There were hundreds of people watching them. They were smiling and some had tears in their eyes. It hit me that these people would normally run past other, but they were coming together to listen to this music.

“As I was riding to work, I realized the best music I was hearing, I heard on the way to the studio, not in the studio. The wheels started turning. The idea of great music and art is to capture moments in time, but (those moments) exist everywhere. If we can harness the energy of those moments, they can inspire us to become full members of the human race. That was the day I decided to bring the studio to the people; to travel the world and film musicians making music in their natural environment, where there’s no separation between the music and the people. That’s the moment Playing For Change was born.”

Johnson quit his job, assembled a small group, including cinematographers Kevin Krupitzer and Jonathan Walls and sound engineer Enzo Buono, put together a mobile recording studio and, between 2001 and 2004, traveled the world in search of musical inspiration. In 2008 Playing For Change entered into a joint venture with Concord Music Group through the support of label co-owner, entertainment legend Norman Lear and Concord Music Group chief creative officer John Burk, for the purpose of supporting ongoing projects, producing CDs, DVDs and merchandise. The hard work and perseverance of Concord Music Group’s team has played an essential role in the Playing For Change story, powering the effort to bring PFC’s vision and inspiration to fruition. The goal is to bring PFC’s music, videos and message to the widest possible audience.

The first Playing For Change project that caught the public’s awareness was a video of the Ben E. King hit “Stand By Me.” Johnson and his crew mixed the performances of 18 street musicians, a South African Choir and a Native American drum group into a clip that went viral on the Internet after Johnson appeared on PBS’ Bill Moyers’ Journal. The song has had over 24 million internet hits since its debut. “Everything was recorded outdoors, where anything can happen. Someone can walk by and their life can get changed, just like that. Nature is the best sounding environment. The birds are always on time and in tune. Music is the one thing that speaks to every living thing.”

“Stand by Me” laid the foundation for the best selling CD/DVD set Playing for Change: Songs Around The World, which debuted at #10 on Billboard’s Pop Chart in April of 2009.

“Music has always been the universal language,” Johnson concludes. We followed the music from city streets to Indian reservations, from African villages to the Himalayan Mountains. I never imagined we’d discover so much love, hope and inspiration. In a world where so much focus is on our differences, I’m proud to have discovered that people everywhere believe in working and playing together.”

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Mark Johnson is a man with a mission. He wants to bring the world together with music and build an organization that will use technology to enable people all over the world to play together, even if they are thousands of miles apart. Part of this vision was introduced to the world on Playing For Change – Songs Around The World; a CD/DVD set that featured the talents of hundreds of musicians from all over the globe. Johnson and his crew filmed and recorded dozens of musicians and spliced them together into videos that seamlessly blended their diverse styles into powerful performances. Formerly unknown street artists like Roger Ridley and Grandpa Elliot stood alongside stars like Bono and Manu Chau. The album made its debut at #10 on Billboard’s Pop Chart and became a worldwide sensation.

Playing For Change - Songs Around The World Part 2 is a continuation and evolution of our desire to present music to inspire the world,” Johnson says. “The journey of this album takes us from a village in Mali to the favelas (slums) of Brazil, from New Orleans to India, Jamaica to Japan. We stopped in 15 countries and recorded more than 150 musicians. One song, “Le Tierra del Olivido (Land of the Forgotten),” has over 80 people playing on it. There are new songs that were written for this album and the quality of our technology has improved.”

Like the other Playing For Change projects, Songs Around the World Part 2 was done on the fly. “We do rough mixes as we go, and a rough video mix as well. We made an album that you can put in your car and take the world for a ride and a DVD that will take you on a journey around the globe. This is a body of work that stands alone, integrating high quality audio and video. We integrate sounds and combinations of music that aren’t ordinarily put together. This is real world music, played from the heart. The musicians listen to the songs, then decide how they can make it sound better. They listen more and play less. That’s how we get so many musicians on a song and still hear every instrument, every voice. It’s really music with no ego.”

The music on Songs Around the World Part 2 is truly global, a dizzying mix of styles, cultures and rhythms. Baaba Maal’s arrangement of Bob Marley’s “Three Little Birds” has an African groove that’s complimented by rhythms from eight Brazilian percussionists, Keb’ Mo’s Delta blues guitar, trap drummer Courtney “Bam” Diedrick’s reggae backbeat and D. Chandrajit’s tabla. Tinariwen, a band of musicians from the deserts of Northern Mali incorporate American blues, African rhythms and Tuareg folk music, provide the driving pulse for Stevie Wonder’s “Higher Ground.” Tinariwen also form the back beat on their own “Groove in G” an improvisation that features Ag Alhabib’s electric guitar, Hiromitsu Agatsuma’s shamisen and a dozen Indian, African, Jamaican and Brazilian drummers and percussionists as well as subtle improvisations from sitar, veena and sarod players.

“Le Tierra del Olivido (Land of the Forgotten)” is a plea for peace from Columbia’s Carlos Vives that combines elements of vallenato, bambuco and salsa, with a hint of cumbia. The track includes 80 Columbian musicians and the 30 piece Orquesta Sinfonica Juvenil Batuta. Grandpa Elliot and Roger Ridley, the voices that made “Stand By Me” so compelling, sing a duet on Otis Redding’s “(Sitting on the) Dock of the Bay,” supported by Japanese blues superstar Char on lead guitar and the steel guitar of Italy’s Roberto Luti.

Hiromitsu Agatsuma’s shamisen and Congolese guitarist Jason Tamba introduce “Redemption Song,” featuring Steven Marley singing with his father. “We thought it would be nice to have Bob sing with one of his sons,” Johnson explains. “We took a performance from The Wailers’ last European tour and created a click track using Bob’s vocal. We asked the musicians to play this as if it were the last song they’d ever play in this life. You can feel that emotion come through on very single note. It ends the album with a feeling of forgiveness and hope.”

Playing For Change - Songs Around The World Part 2 is another moving document that shows the human family playing together showing all their colors, joys and hopes. It’s a cultural kaleidoscope that displays the best we have to offer each other.

Johnson’s vision doesn’t stop when the music’s over. “‘Stand by Me’ started with one man and a guitar and ended with the whole world singing together,” Johnson says. “That inspired the Playing For Change Foundation. We’re taking the money we make and funding music schools all over the world. They’ll be connected with video and audio links that will allow children all over the world to sing together. The Foundation’s first project, the Ntonga Music School in South Africa, opened in 2009. We also have three schools in Nepal and schools in Ghana, Mali and Rwanda where we’re working with genocide orphans who are already making music.”

To create the links between schools, Playing For Change is working with engineers from NASA. They want to offer third world countries the ability to connect with the outside world through the Internet. “We recently went to MIT in Boston with the NASA guys,” Johnson says. “We had Boston high school music students connect in real time to our school in South Africa. The kids were performing and interacting with each other and, at the end of the session, they were in love with each other. All prejudice was wiped away. That’s the motivation behind the PFC foundation.”

Mark Johnson remembers the day he decided to start the project that became Playing For Change. “I had an epiphany in a subway station,” Johnson recalls. “I heard music and saw two monks playing on the platform. They were painted white and wearing robes. One was playing a nylon guitar, the other was singing in a language I didn’t understand. There were hundreds of people watching them. They were smiling and some had tears in their eyes. It hit me that these people would normally run past other, but they were coming together to listen to this music.

“As I was riding to work, I realized the best music I was hearing, I heard on the way to the studio, not in the studio. The wheels started turning. The idea of great music and art is to capture moments in time, but (those moments) exist everywhere. If we can harness the energy of those moments, they can inspire us to become full members of the human race. That was the day I decided to bring the studio to the people; to travel the world and film musicians making music in their natural environment, where there’s no separation between the music and the people. That’s the moment Playing For Change was born.”

Johnson quit his job, assembled a small group, including cinematographers Kevin Krupitzer and Jonathan Walls and sound engineer Enzo Buono, put together a mobile recording studio and, between 2001 and 2004, traveled the world in search of musical inspiration. In 2008 Playing For Change entered into a joint venture with Concord Music Group through the support of label co-owner, entertainment legend Norman Lear and Concord Music Group chief creative officer John Burk, for the purpose of supporting ongoing projects, producing CDs, DVDs and merchandise. The hard work and perseverance of Concord Music Group’s team has played an essential role in the Playing For Change story, powering the effort to bring PFC’s vision and inspiration to fruition. The goal is to bring PFC’s music, videos and message to the widest possible audience.

The first Playing For Change project that caught the public’s awareness was a video of the Ben E. King hit “Stand By Me.” Johnson and his crew mixed the performances of 18 street musicians, a South African Choir and a Native American drum group into a clip that went viral on the Internet after Johnson appeared on PBS’ Bill Moyers’ Journal. The song has had over 24 million internet hits since its debut. “Everything was recorded outdoors, where anything can happen. Someone can walk by and their life can get changed, just like that. Nature is the best sounding environment. The birds are always on time and in tune. Music is the one thing that speaks to every living thing.”

“Stand by Me” laid the foundation for the best selling CD/DVD set Playing for Change: Songs Around The World, which debuted at #10 on Billboard’s Pop Chart in April of 2009.

“Music has always been the universal language,” Johnson concludes. We followed the music from city streets to Indian reservations, from African villages to the Himalayan Mountains. I never imagined we’d discover so much love, hope and inspiration. In a world where so much focus is on our differences, I’m proud to have discovered that people everywhere believe in working and playing together.”

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Mark Johnson is a man with a mission. He wants to bring the world together with music and build an organization that will use technology to enable people all over the world to play together, even if they are thousands of miles apart. Part of this vision was introduced to the world on Playing For Change – Songs Around The World; a CD/DVD set that featured the talents of hundreds of musicians from all over the globe. Johnson and his crew filmed and recorded dozens of musicians and spliced them together into videos that seamlessly blended their diverse styles into powerful performances. Formerly unknown street artists like Roger Ridley and Grandpa Elliot stood alongside stars like Bono and Manu Chau. The album made its debut at #10 on Billboard’s Pop Chart and became a worldwide sensation.

Playing For Change - Songs Around The World Part 2 is a continuation and evolution of our desire to present music to inspire the world,” Johnson says. “The journey of this album takes us from a village in Mali to the favelas (slums) of Brazil, from New Orleans to India, Jamaica to Japan. We stopped in 15 countries and recorded more than 150 musicians. One song, “Le Tierra del Olivido (Land of the Forgotten),” has over 80 people playing on it. There are new songs that were written for this album and the quality of our technology has improved.”

Like the other Playing For Change projects, Songs Around the World Part 2 was done on the fly. “We do rough mixes as we go, and a rough video mix as well. We made an album that you can put in your car and take the world for a ride and a DVD that will take you on a journey around the globe. This is a body of work that stands alone, integrating high quality audio and video. We integrate sounds and combinations of music that aren’t ordinarily put together. This is real world music, played from the heart. The musicians listen to the songs, then decide how they can make it sound better. They listen more and play less. That’s how we get so many musicians on a song and still hear every instrument, every voice. It’s really music with no ego.”

The music on Songs Around the World Part 2 is truly global, a dizzying mix of styles, cultures and rhythms. Baaba Maal’s arrangement of Bob Marley’s “Three Little Birds” has an African groove that’s complimented by rhythms from eight Brazilian percussionists, Keb’ Mo’s Delta blues guitar, trap drummer Courtney “Bam” Diedrick’s reggae backbeat and D. Chandrajit’s tabla. Tinariwen, a band of musicians from the deserts of Northern Mali incorporate American blues, African rhythms and Tuareg folk music, provide the driving pulse for Stevie Wonder’s “Higher Ground.” Tinariwen also form the back beat on their own “Groove in G” an improvisation that features Ag Alhabib’s electric guitar, Hiromitsu Agatsuma’s shamisen and a dozen Indian, African, Jamaican and Brazilian drummers and percussionists as well as subtle improvisations from sitar, veena and sarod players.

“Le Tierra del Olivido (Land of the Forgotten)” is a plea for peace from Columbia’s Carlos Vives that combines elements of vallenato, bambuco and salsa, with a hint of cumbia. The track includes 80 Columbian musicians and the 30 piece Orquesta Sinfonica Juvenil Batuta. Grandpa Elliot and Roger Ridley, the voices that made “Stand By Me” so compelling, sing a duet on Otis Redding’s “(Sitting on the) Dock of the Bay,” supported by Japanese blues superstar Char on lead guitar and the steel guitar of Italy’s Roberto Luti.

Hiromitsu Agatsuma’s shamisen and Congolese guitarist Jason Tamba introduce “Redemption Song,” featuring Steven Marley singing with his father. “We thought it would be nice to have Bob sing with one of his sons,” Johnson explains. “We took a performance from The Wailers’ last European tour and created a click track using Bob’s vocal. We asked the musicians to play this as if it were the last song they’d ever play in this life. You can feel that emotion come through on very single note. It ends the album with a feeling of forgiveness and hope.”

Playing For Change - Songs Around The World Part 2 is another moving document that shows the human family playing together showing all their colors, joys and hopes. It’s a cultural kaleidoscope that displays the best we have to offer each other.

Johnson’s vision doesn’t stop when the music’s over. “‘Stand by Me’ started with one man and a guitar and ended with the whole world singing together,” Johnson says. “That inspired the Playing For Change Foundation. We’re taking the money we make and funding music schools all over the world. They’ll be connected with video and audio links that will allow children all over the world to sing together. The Foundation’s first project, the Ntonga Music School in South Africa, opened in 2009. We also have three schools in Nepal and schools in Ghana, Mali and Rwanda where we’re working with genocide orphans who are already making music.”

To create the links between schools, Playing For Change is working with engineers from NASA. They want to offer third world countries the ability to connect with the outside world through the Internet. “We recently went to MIT in Boston with the NASA guys,” Johnson says. “We had Boston high school music students connect in real time to our school in South Africa. The kids were performing and interacting with each other and, at the end of the session, they were in love with each other. All prejudice was wiped away. That’s the motivation behind the PFC foundation.”

Mark Johnson remembers the day he decided to start the project that became Playing For Change. “I had an epiphany in a subway station,” Johnson recalls. “I heard music and saw two monks playing on the platform. They were painted white and wearing robes. One was playing a nylon guitar, the other was singing in a language I didn’t understand. There were hundreds of people watching them. They were smiling and some had tears in their eyes. It hit me that these people would normally run past other, but they were coming together to listen to this music.

“As I was riding to work, I realized the best music I was hearing, I heard on the way to the studio, not in the studio. The wheels started turning. The idea of great music and art is to capture moments in time, but (those moments) exist everywhere. If we can harness the energy of those moments, they can inspire us to become full members of the human race. That was the day I decided to bring the studio to the people; to travel the world and film musicians making music in their natural environment, where there’s no separation between the music and the people. That’s the moment Playing For Change was born.”

Johnson quit his job, assembled a small group, including cinematographers Kevin Krupitzer and Jonathan Walls and sound engineer Enzo Buono, put together a mobile recording studio and, between 2001 and 2004, traveled the world in search of musical inspiration. In 2008 Playing For Change entered into a joint venture with Concord Music Group through the support of label co-owner, entertainment legend Norman Lear and Concord Music Group chief creative officer John Burk, for the purpose of supporting ongoing projects, producing CDs, DVDs and merchandise. The hard work and perseverance of Concord Music Group’s team has played an essential role in the Playing For Change story, powering the effort to bring PFC’s vision and inspiration to fruition. The goal is to bring PFC’s music, videos and message to the widest possible audience.

The first Playing For Change project that caught the public’s awareness was a video of the Ben E. King hit “Stand By Me.” Johnson and his crew mixed the performances of 18 street musicians, a South African Choir and a Native American drum group into a clip that went viral on the Internet after Johnson appeared on PBS’ Bill Moyers’ Journal. The song has had over 24 million internet hits since its debut. “Everything was recorded outdoors, where anything can happen. Someone can walk by and their life can get changed, just like that. Nature is the best sounding environment. The birds are always on time and in tune. Music is the one thing that speaks to every living thing.”

“Stand by Me” laid the foundation for the best selling CD/DVD set Playing for Change: Songs Around The World, which debuted at #10 on Billboard’s Pop Chart in April of 2009.

“Music has always been the universal language,” Johnson concludes. We followed the music from city streets to Indian reservations, from African villages to the Himalayan Mountains. I never imagined we’d discover so much love, hope and inspiration. In a world where so much focus is on our differences, I’m proud to have discovered that people everywhere believe in working and playing together.”

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Improve This Page

If you’re the artist, management or record label, you can update your biography, photos, videos and more at Artist Central.

Get started at Artist Central

Feedback

Check out our Artist Stores FAQ
Send us feedback about this page