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Playing The Angel [Explicit]
 
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Playing The Angel [Explicit]

3 July 2013 | Format: MP3

£6.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £5.01 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:10
30
2
3:41
30
3
3:49
30
4
4:55
30
5
4:10
30
6
4:02
30
7
6:09
30
8
4:21
30
9
1:42
30
10
3:27
30
11
4:45
30
12
6:55
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 3 July 2013
  • Release Date: 3 July 2013
  • Label: BMG Rights Management / Mute Records Ltd.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 52:06
  • Genres:
  • Format: Explicit Lyrics
  • ASIN: B00DP55D1S
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 969 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 3 Nov. 2005
Format: Audio CD
Although the reviews here are mostly mixed it would be true to say that even the best albums divide opinion. What Depeche Mode have achieved with Playing The Angel is another metamorphosis of their sound. The band constantly develops and this upsets some of their original fanbase but is crucial to their evolution and longevity. Playing The Angel manages to sound very Depeche Mode like but, simutaneously, completely fresh and unlike anything other music of the day. The basis, of course, is electronic sound which on this album is louder and dirtier than on recent records- somewhere beyond 1997's Ultra. It is to the band's credit that they retain their sound while working with different innovative producers on each project- in this case Ben Hillier who brings the music closest to the sound they achieved when Alan Wilder was still part of the band. The single, Precious, at first appears a rather tame melodic track but listen to it on headphones and it becomes evident that it has a hard basis of heavy electronica and is satisfyingly complex- it is a track that grows in stature with repeated listening. The first five tracks are driving, urgent and dirty and contain immediately appealing hooks and surprisingly savvy techno elements which even Underground Resistance purists would appreciate. The synthesisers could be from any period from 1982 to the present day and there is no band better at using them. I would say, though, that the album's core strength is the vocal arrangements. These have developed so much over the years and occasionally bring a deep soulfulness to the music- check out the Dave Gahan penned Suffer Well for an example.Read more ›
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mr. M. A. Reed TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 30 Jun. 2007
Format: Audio CD
Quite how this perverse bunch of multi-millionaires got to headline stadiums across the US should baffle everyone. With their eleventh album, "Playing The Angel", Depeche Mode continue to mine the dark alley of spiritually confused pain and suffering with beats.

If it wasn't for the fact that Depeche Mode made some thirty or so chirpy perverse pop songs a decade or so ago, they could easily have fallen by the wayside, and be like The Human League, playing the Exeter Lemon Grove and free shows organised by Councils. If they'd never had hits, they would be at best, a backroom partime hobby for some bored office workers who like playing popstar four weeks a year, or at worst an obscure memory.

Faster, harder, and darker than anything they've ever done, "Playing The Angel" is a determinedly perverse beast. Sounding like the work of accountants brought up in the early Eighties with a penchant for suburban orgies and religious guilt, it's the soundtrack to a hundred traffic jam breakdowns, a thousand moments of commuter terror, and at least one mid-life crisis.

Familiar themes abound : "A Pain I'm Used To" sounds like the title of a parody of Depeche Mode, and follows the odd hybrid of bleeps, driving beats, and weird electronic blues that they've made their trademark. It growls and grinds and sounds like tyres screeching on rubber. And in the midst of it all, the band writhe as if they're almost enjoying it. As if, in this self-inflicted prison of guilt and sex, they have made it comfortable. And it sounds ace. In the way that a life made of old skool synths, minor chords, and a melancholy sense of hope can only be.

With not much in the way of progression (aside from a slight hastening of BPM's), it sees DM refining their template.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Alvin Tan on 17 Oct. 2005
Format: Audio CD
Having been a fan of DM for ages (since my introduction to them during my high school days back in the 1980s), it was good news to me when I heard about their intention to record a new album as afterall, it has been 4 years since their last effort. But on the other hand, I wasn't quite sure what to expect. Their last few albums have had mixed reviews... 'Exciter', though a well-recorded album, was considered by many as being too experimental and lacking in Mode-styled, powerful dark-electro-dance tunes that have made them so popular... 'Ultra' contained some excellent tracks but was criticised for lacking uniformity and direction... 'Songs of Faith and Devotion' brought them to the height of their career but was a more rock-powered and less synth-laden experience. Although 'Songs of Faith and Devotion' and 'Ultra' are actually 2 of my favourite DM albums (despite some who hate them and prefer their older albums), I can't say the same for 'Exciter' as I did not particularly enjoy it when it was release, and up till today, I still feel that 'Exciter' is their weakest album to date. So, I was pretty worried about a similar sounding new album. But just a few seconds after putting the new CD into my CD player... listening to the griding industrial intro of 'A Pain That I'm Used To' and I thought... yes, definitely some potential here... and scrolling through quickly track-by-track, I wasn't disappointed. From a creative synthed-up adaptation of the traditional 'John the Relevator', to the classic Mode sounding 'Suffer Well', 'Precious' and 'Lilian', and the slower and darker tracks like 'I Want It All' and 'Damaged People', this new album does not disappoint. YES, they are definitely BACK! And most interestingly, we now have not only Martin's songs but Dave's as well.Read more ›
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