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Plastic
 
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Plastic

7 July 2006 | Format: MP3

5.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:59
30
2
3:40
30
3
3:33
30
4
4:41
30
5
5:58
30
6
4:38
30
7
6:25
30
8
4:51
30
9
4:31
30
10
4:41
30
11
4:56
30
12
4:06

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 7 July 2006
  • Release Date: 7 July 2006
  • Label: Parlophone Poland
  • Copyright: 2006 Parlophone Music Poland Sp. z.o.o. This Labelcopy information is the subject of Copyright Protection. All rights reserved. (C) 2006 Parlophone Music Poland Sp. z.o.o.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 56:59
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001JYUYSO
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Lozarithm TOP 500 REVIEWERTOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 13 April 2005
Format: Audio CD
November 9th 1966 was quite an auspicious day for John Lennon, and for the rest of the world in some small way, because when walked into London's Indica Gallery he met Yoko Ono. The lives of both were forever altered by the other, perhaps more so for Lennon as Yoko introduced him to the avant-garde art world from a perspective that was wholly new to him, and a world beyond Beatledom.
Four years later the albums John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band and Yoko Ono/Plastic Ono Band were simultaneously unleashed on Apple, the name of the label inspired by Yoko Ono, each featuring matching photos of John and Yoko under a tree on the front cover and a photograph of them as a child on the reverse. Both albums explore the themes of basics, innocence and childhood. On the John Lennon album, Yoko is credited with "wind".
John Lennon's first solo album after splitting from the Beatles obviously had an inbuilt importance, and probably outsold the Yoko Ono album many thousands of times over, but Yoko's was probably the more innovative and ahead of its time, and still sounds heady, fresh and exciting today.
The album starts with the sound of a tape machine being turned on and the sizzling rhythm section of Klaus Voormann and Ringo Starr begins, abetted by the sounds of John Lennon's screaming guitar in a style far more liberated than on any Beatle record. When Yoko comes in, screaming the title of the song, "Why" (the only discernable fragment of lyric on the whole album), we realize that Lennon's guitar has been cleverly mimicking and anticipating Yoko's vocal, which has an awesome ferocity and intensity, and in that moment she redefines the role of woman in music for generations to come. The following track, appropriately, is Why Not.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 17 Sep 2000
Format: Audio CD
In 1969, a crowded Toronto auditorium full of rock & rollers attending a rock & roll revival (featuring some of the biggest names in rock history) patiently awaited the much-publicized debut of John Lennon's 'Plastic Ono Band'. When the band finally took the stage, they played a set of the usual rock & roll favorites to which the crowd responded well. Then John turned the mic over to his new partner, Yoko... Music as the world knew it would never be the same!
For her first solo album, Yoko divided her set between her newly created primal rock jams taking up side one and her more freeform avant-garde featured on side two. There is no question that the world was not exactly ready for the type of music this revolutionary album offered, but it did not deserve the negative response it received. Looking back on it now, this album was probably one of the most groundbreaking of its era. Here we have a woman, a Japanese woman at that, not only leading a rock band rather than just merely singing with it, but also using her voice more like a musical instrument rather than simply singing. The intense energy of the album was something that had not been experienced by most people at that time.
From the opening guitar screech of "Why" to the final end of "Paper Shoes" the album never loses it's creative edge. The two most powerful tracks on the album are of course the full-tilt rocker "Why" and the bluesy "Why Not" which at nearly 10 minutes never allows the listener to get bored. "Greenfield Morning..." is an interesting piece even if only for it's abnormally long title. In recent years, the song received a 'hats off' from fellow Japanese pop singers Shonen Knife.
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