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Plastic Jesus Paperback – 15 Nov 2013

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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Salt Publishing (15 Nov. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1907773630
  • ISBN-13: 978-1907773631
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 1.8 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 319,801 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Belfast born, Wayne Simmons, has loitered with intent around the genre circuit for some years. He penned reviews and interviews for several online zines before publication of his debut novel in 2008.

Wayne's work has since been published in the UK, Austria, Germany, Spain, Turkey and North America. His bestselling zombie novel, FLU, was serialised by Sirius XM's Book Radio.

As well as writing fiction, Wayne is a regular contributor to Skin Deep Tattoo Magazine and PR/ Marketing chief for Infected Books. In 2013 and 2014, Wayne co-produced the popular Scardiff Horror Expo.

Wayne now lives in Wales with his ghoulfiend and their Jack Russel terrier, Dita. Look out for him at various genre, music and tattoo events or visit him online: www.waynesimmons.org

Product Description

Review

Simmons steps out of his blood-splattered comfort zone and makes an indelible mark on the sci-fi genre. (Robin Pierce Starburst Magazine)

'A grim satire on contemporary western hedonism and the religious impulse... The author's previous novels have been in the horror genre, and this shows in his ability to pile on the terror and ratchet up the tension: Plastic Jesus is a stunning read, but not for the faint hearted.' (The Guardian)

'Creates a world of great intrigue and characters that can at times be very absorbing.' --(The Book Bag)

One of the best new horror writers of the decade. Wayne Simmons takes everything you fear and exploits it with no apologies. (James Melzer, author of The Zombie Chronicles)

Wayne Simmons does not disappoint. (Patrick D'Orazio's Tomes of Darkness)

Breathless and unrelenting, you cannot fail to turn the page and see what happens next. (JD Gillam Starburst Magazine)

Fever builds on the nightmare world he created in Flu and manages to make it even more horrific and diseased. A sequel which surpasses the original. --(David Moody)

About the Author

Belfast born, Wayne Simmons penned reviews and interviews for several online genre zines before publication of his debut novel in 2008. Wayne's fiction has since been published in the UK, Austria, Germany, Spain, Turkey and North America. Wayne currently lives in Wales with his ghoulfiend and a Jack Russel terrier called Dita. Look out for Wayne at various genre and tattoo cons or visit him online: http://www.waynesimmons.org

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Rich Hawkins on 21 Jan. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
`Plastic Jesus' is the fifth book from writer Wayne Simmons, and it's a slight departure from his previous novels. So, if you're looking for zombie-horror here, you won't find it. Instead, he's written a sci-fi noir thriller much in the style of `Blade Runner' and `Sin City' mixed with a hint of Mega City One and the film `Children of Men'. This is a bold move from the writer and, to be fair, he pulls it off with style, verve and heaps of cyberpunk goodness.
Set in a dystopian future, Lark City is situated off the coast of America, where hedonism and crime is rife, and the streets are full of the desperate and dangerous. An urban jungle stalked by predators in all forms.
Code guy Johnny Lyon, still recovering from his wife's death, is tasked with creating a Jesus social networking AI, to rebrand religion years after a terrible holy war. Something goes wrong. Soon, the streets are in chaos and the city is on the verge of imploding.
It's a story full of grit and filth; you can almost smell the stink of dirty streets and random violence rising off the page. My fingers felt grimy after reading the book, but in a good way. The novel is populated with a menagerie of desperate, lost people. There are some great characters. Johnny is excellently-realised, as are the police chief, Rudlow, and the Bar Man, the local crime lord's henchman and probably my favourite character. The only character I felt could have been developed a bit more was Paul McBride, the crime boss who rules the criminal underworld in Lark City. He wasn't a two-dimensional villain by any means but he didn't quite ring true for me.
`Plastic Jesus' is an excellent novel and proof that Wayne Simmons can turn his hand to other genres as well as horror. It's fast-paced, with prose as lean as a whippet, and peppered with razor-sharp social commentary and observations on religion, technology, and the dark side of human nature.
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Format: Paperback
Belfast born, and now Cardiff incomer, Wayne Simmons is an author best known for his string of excellent zombie novels: Drop Dead Gorgeous, Flu, Fever, and Doll Parts, which have been published in the UK, Austria, Germany, Spain, Turkey and North America.

With Plastic Jesus he has turned his hand to a near future, dystopian science fiction treat of a thriller which brings us the twisted love child of Blade Runner, Lawnmower Man and Judge Dredd. This novel could easily have been a gritty and dirty crime novel, with a seedy underbelly of a broken city cleverly shown within each and every page. From crime lords to junkies, to corrupt police and corrupting big business, this novel had every making of a noir special ...but Wayne wasn't satisfied with `just' a great crime book, oh no. This book shows us what just may happen when religion and capitalism collide in unholy matrimony and the world `ends' as a result. Well, when I say ends I mean society pretty much collapses: drugs, prostitution, and virtual reality technology hold sway in a future where religion is forgotten, disparaged, or is a dirty word.

As with his other books Wayne jumps right into things and keeps a pretty frenetic pace all the way through. Disparate characters are introduced at break neck speed and only near the end do they all started to come together, strands of a very large web that Wayne deftly weaves in his story. There isn't really a `good' guy amongst the bunch. Johnny Lyons is a widower who is drowning in his own grief. Garcon, his boss, is willing to go to any lengths to give his company the success that it needs. Harold Shephard, the last preacher in a city without religion, has lost his faith. Rudlow, the chief of police, is desperate to bring the ruling crime lord to justice.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Pablo Cheesecake (The Eloquent Page) TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 30 Dec. 2013
Format: Paperback
All the characters in Plastic Jesus are lost or broken in one way or another. They're all looking for something that's missing from their lives. For Johnny Lyon, the rawness of a recent bereavement still weighs heavy. He's conflicted, looking for some sort of closure, but in the same breath unable to give up the past. He throws himself into his work and the result is an artificial intelligence designed to help save souls.

While Lyon unwittingly unleashes his own take of "Buddy Christ" onto the world, we also get to meet Paul McBride. He's the local crime boss, and a suitably nasty piece of work he is too. McBride's preferred method of coercion is a kind word and a very, very sharp knife. He has a sinister henchman known only as The Bar Man, and their criminal enterprises manage to inadvertently become caught up with Johnny's narrative.

Soon after I started reading Plastic Jesus, I realised that it reminded me of something. I wracked my brain, I'll admit it took me a while, and eventually it all came flooding back. Many moons ago, in the late nineteen eighties, Pat Mills and Kevin O'Neill created a comic book back called Marshal Law. The eponymous hero patrolled the streets of a grimy metropolis called San Futuro. Everything in this neon-coated candy-land was delightfully sleazy. Crime was rampant and justice was delivered with a heavy hand. Lark City is cut from similarly pre-apocalyptic cloth. Past its best, barely managing to exist, the city and its populace are just about surviving. This was my favourite component of the novel. Lark City is so well observed. There are loads of tiny little details that make the locations seem to come alive.
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