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No Place Like Home Paperback – 4 Sep 2006

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Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Fourth Estate; (Reissue) edition (4 Sept. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007232411
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007232413
  • Product Dimensions: 19.9 x 2.4 x 21.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 466,253 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Amazon Review

Rowley Leigh's stylish No Place Like Home is a vigorously argued treatise in praise of home cooking. Strange, perhaps, for a metropolitan restaurant chef--but Leigh's food is noted for its simplicity, seasonality and truth of flavour. Here he concentrates on food that is better when done at home than in a restaurant. A roast leg of lamb rather than a piece of grilled chump; summer pudding rather than a Grand Marnier soufflé. Cassoulet; breast of veal with pork, spinach and garlic stuffing; baked quinces with cinnamon and Vin Santo. This is wonderful food--rich, savoury, elegant and designed to bring out the best in the ingredients. Leigh covers all the basics--roasts, stews, perfect mash and so on--but also gives himself room for a welcome idiosyncrasy. The book is cleverly structured: it falls into four seasonal parts, each of which contains a number of complete three-course meals for different types of occasion--Easter Sunday Lunch, Alfresco Dinner, Halloween Night, Boxing Day Lunch are some of these exemplars. (Leigh acknowledges that few people care nowadays to cook three courses for every meal, but as he says, the recipes are there if you want them.) Additionally, three starch Interludes contain meditations on potatoes, rice and pasta. Leigh is devoted to British food, as you can tell from his flag-waving spring meal to impress foreigners: sea kale with blood orange hollandaise; sea trout fillet with a horseradish crust, served with Jersey Royal potatoes; and rhubarb fool. The book is greatly enhanced by good photography (good in that it actually shows what the food should look like) and by Lucinda Rogers' witty line-drawings, so reminiscent of Elizabeth David's early illustrators. --Robin Davidson --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

There is no place like home to enjoy the simple stuff. Can a restaurant match the sight or aroma of a leg of lamb brought to the table, that sense of salivatory anticipation, or the sense of participation as a member of the group carves and apportions the meat before one’s eyes?’

Roast leg of lamb crusted with garlic and parsley, accompanied by tender stalks of purple sprouting broccoli at the peak of their season, followed by a rich chocolate mousse. It is a meal to savour, a lunch to linger over deep into the afternoon with friends, family and fine wine. It is not a meal that can be truly enjoyed in the bustle of a restaurant.

Renowned chef and food writer Rowley Leigh places these dishes at the heart of his first book. His superb writing passionately celebrates home cooking for its simplicity, seasonality and the joys of eating at home and cooking for friends. Recipes range from the more familiar delights of the Sunday roast and summer pudding, to native rarities such as sea kale, quinces and wild sea trout fillet, to the simple pleasures of parma ham and figs or just an apple and cheese for pudding.

Leigh focuses on the ingredients Britain grows best, recasting the familiar to inspire with its diversity and subtlety. Pears come in a salad with scarole and roquefort. Venison is stewed with chocolate and onions and accompanied by silken polenta. Greengages and almonds make a delicious tart. And if you thought shrimp paste, macaroni or cod and parsley were old hat, this book will make you think again.

All the basics are covered, with failsafe recipes for the perfect mash, quick roast potatoes, simple pasta and everything you can do with rice. There are witty and opinionated digressions into Euro food, Australian cricket and the strangeness of rhubarb, amongst others. Menus are based on calendar events such as Boxing Day lunch, Hallowe’en Night and a spring lunch for a ‘fishetarian’ aunt.

Beautifully illustrated with original line drawings by Lucinda Rogers and colour photography, this is an irresistible invitation to keep those home fires burning.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Robert Hanson on 3 Nov. 2009
Format: Paperback
I was drawn to buy this book by memories of Rowley Leigh's newspaper column from a few years ago, in which he inspired me to try cooking good, honest, tasty and not over-flashy food. The recipes in this book which I have tried so far have had exactly those qualities and also have enabled me to produce more subtle flavours than I often do! However, this is not a book for week-day suppers. Ingredients are not obscure but a fair amount of time and care is needed in their preparation. Don't expect a Nigel Slater style solution for when you get home from work late, tired and hungry. But for more expansive weekend occasions your time and care will be well rewarded, and Rowley Leigh's writing is genial and companionable on the way.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Paul Cloutman on 22 Oct. 2000
Format: Hardcover
I bought this book for my chef son. I opened it and read it from cover to cover. Not only are Rowley Leigh's comments witty and wise, but the recipes are so well organised (into seasons and menus) and so appetising and commonsensical to follow that I started using the book myself the very next day. I am now buying another for my son. One tiny quibble - the illustrator is good, but not so good as her status on the jacket suggests. The photoraphs are more useful - and better.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By miss malta on 15 Jan. 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
What a truely lovely book to read, and I hate reading! I love his humour and the recipes are delightful too. Would highly reccommend this book.
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Robert on 16 Jun. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Recipes are good but the book is very bland and we gave ours to the charity shop
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