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Pieces of Light: The new science of memory Hardcover – 5 Jul 2012


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Profile Books; Advance Reading Copy? edition (5 July 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 184668448X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846684487
  • Product Dimensions: 14.4 x 3.2 x 22.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 117,194 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Charles Fernyhough is a writer and psychologist. His intellectual biography of his three-year-old daughter, The Baby in the Mirror (Granta, 2008) has been translated into seven languages. He is the author of two novels, The Auctioneer (Fourth Estate, 1999) and A Box of Birds (Unbound, 2012). He teaches psychology at Durham University, and has written for numerous publications including the Guardian, Financial Times and Sunday Telegraph. Website: www.charlesfernyhough.com Twitter: @cfernyhough, #PiecesOfLight

Product Description

Review

In this enthralling tour of human memory, Charles Fernyhough - himself a hybrid of science and poetry - reveals the mysterious forces behind these stories that shape our lives. (Jonah Lehrer, author of Imagine: How Creativity Works)

Both playful and profound, a wonderfully memorable read (Douwe Draaisma, author of Why Life Speeds Up As You Get Older)

A beautifully written, absorbing read - a fascinating journey through the latest science of memory (Elizabeth Loftus, Distinguished Professor, University of California, Irvine)

Fernyhough weaves literature and science to expose our rich, beautiful relationship with our past and future selves. (Dr. David Eagleman, Neuroscientist and author of Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain)

Combining the engaging style of a novelist with the rigour of a scientist, Charles Fernyhough has written an insightful and thought provoking meditation on the nature of memory and its implications for our everyday lives. Pieces of Light will both linger in your memory and change the way you think about it. (Daniel L. Schacter, Professor of Psychology, Harvard University, and author of The Seven Sins of Memory: How the Mind Forgets and Remembers.)

An immense pleasure (New Scientist)

A captivating journey into the mind...[told] with great style. (Telegraph)

With elegance and clinical sympathy, Fernyhough tells the stories of patients with various forms of brain damage that cause amnesia. Memory may remain an enigma, but this book is a good, accessible read (BBC Focus)

Book Description

Why we remember what we remember.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By CG on 14 Nov. 2012
Format: Hardcover
This is a great book! It introduces each memory first through a personal or case experience, which is followed by the most recent scientific data in the field. You can grasp the laborious research which has gone into this book, everything is incredibly well explained. With me coming from a memory and neuroscience field myself, it is incredibly easy to read. But also for people with an interest, yet not a detailed knowledge, this book is a must read.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Dr. P. Shurmer-smith on 22 Feb. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was searching for something up-to-date that would explain the science and art of memory; I wanted a book that was comprehensible to an outsider to neuroscience but not one that oversimplified. Fernyhough's book is perfect, so useful that I bought a second copy for my iPad.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By The Book Witch on 1 Nov. 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This has been my bedside reading for the past couple of weeks. I've always been interested in the way Memory and Imagination work together to create. How the imagination takes all the snippets of things we've stored in our brains over the years and weaves them into something completely new. What I didn't realise, until I read Charles Fernyhough's book, Pieces of Light: The new science of memory was just how dependent the memory was on imagination in order to enable us to remember.

It seems that our memories of past events aren't stored in one place, like a video film, just waiting to be re-run, but in bits and pieces of information in different parts of the brain; smell in one place, sound in another, visual and emotional cues in others. When we try to remember something that happened to us in the past, our imagination comes into play to reconstruct the memory as a narrative, which explains why people remember things so differently, and memories alter through time - a minor detail when the event took place might acquire real significance later.

In amnesia victims, where the part of the brain that controls imagination is damaged, memory is severely disrupted and `forward thinking' - the ability to speculate about the future - is impossible.

The way we encode our lives in the memory is also interesting - apparently we are all natural story-tellers. `Narrative,' Fernyhough states, `is a key organisational force in autobiographical memory.' We remember events as stories, pieces of narrative. The author comments in the book, `I set out to write about some science, and I ended up by telling a lot of stories'.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Martin Vickers on 23 Feb. 2014
Format: Paperback
This is not your average science book. Mixing very personal biography with the the very latest neuroscience Charles Fernyhough takes us on a journey of our understanding of memory. Reading it felt like a cross between "A Wavewatchers Companion" and "My Beautiful Genome" also both great books and highly recommended.

As Rolf Dobelli neatly explains in "The Art of Thinking Clearly" we have an inherent bias towards remembering stories rather than facts and Charles Fernyhough uses this to create a book about memory that is indeed memorable for all the right reasons.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By stibule on 1 Sept. 2013
Format: Paperback
This book provided a scientific overview of memory, told by reference to personal experiences and observations. Its hugely readable style of writing brought to life a hugely complex subject area and made it accessible to psychology novices like me without being condescending. Recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Aurifex on 11 May 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I read The Baby in the Mirror a few years ago and found it fascinating. Before buying Pieces of Light (which I think is a pun on Pieces of Eight, for buried treasure) I'd read Mlodinow's book Subliminal, about current thinking on the way the unconscious mind takes care of most of what we do, and I was afraid this book would be covering the same ground. However, although it refers (sparingly) to recent research and new discoveries about which parts of the brain process what, it wasn't at all like Mlodinow's book, which is jokey and matter-of-fact (and incidentally, also excellent). Fernyhough's book is very personal, deep and moving, and reads much more like a novel than a popular science book.
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