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Piccadilly


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Piccadilly + A Cottage on Dartmoor [DVD] + Pandora's Box [DVD]
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Product details

  • Actors: Anne May Wong, Gilda Gray
  • Directors: E.A. Dupont
  • Format: PAL
  • Subtitles: Italian
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: U
  • Studio: CD
  • Run Time: 108.00 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0041CZZ5I
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 510,370 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Need to split your f-connector input e.g. to multiple receivers and/or cable modem? This splitter will allow you to do it. Digital Compatible For use with Satellite or Cable TV which use f-connectors All outputs can be used for power passing (e.g. for movable dishes). 1 x f-connector screw-in input 8 x f-connector screw-in outputs Power Pass through either outputs 5-2050MHz

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 17 Nov. 2007
Format: DVD
Filmed at the very start of the talkie era Piccadilly was released in both silent and talkie version this is the silent version.

Anna May Wong dominates the film as Sho Sho a Chinese dancer but there are other fine performances from Jameson Thomas as "Valentine Wimot" the owner of the Piccadilly night club. The excellent scenes in the Piccadilly take us back to the exuberance of the flapper era, although the famed exotic dancing of Wong falls a little short of modern concepts.

For a silent film "Piccadilly" has complex relationships, especially between Sho Sho and Jim (King Hou Chang) who seems to live with her and could be either her lover or her brother.

We are fortunate that the fine production, acting and sets are presented in a near perfect tinted transfer.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By cap'n sandy on 25 Mar. 2013
Format: DVD
the film itself is excellent. However, I've never heard a less appropriate musical accompaniment to a silent film. It was so bad that I resorted to, you've guessed it, silence. It is decidedly MOR, extremely light-weight pseudo jazz like it came from a b-movie 1960's film -- or maybe even elevator music, it was so bland. At many points it doesn't even attempt to be part of the same film -- truly awful, and that, unfortunately, detracted from the enjoyment of the film.
Surely the BFI is aware of the monstrocity of this musical accident -- they should be prepared to remaster (re-record!) the music as well as they have done the film. 5 stars for the film, minus for the so-called music!
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Wordsworth on 1 Sept. 2011
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A wonderful restoration by bfi of a 1929 film, but it's been ruined by adding a modern sound score. The new soundtrack bears no relation at all to 1920's jazz or dance music, and even worse, continues along with very little regard to the intricacies of the plot.

I found the soundtrack both intrusive and monotonous and ended up turning the sound off because it was driving me up the wall.

If the talkie version of this film still exists I would certainly buy it, at least I wouldn't have to listen to that dreadful background music.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Raphael Mann on 2 April 2013
Format: VHS Tape
I can only echo what has been said by previous reviewers, in the hope that the weight of opinion will get through to someone at BFI...

Piccadilly has its flaws as a film, but it's nevertheless a unique and enjoyable piece of work. It's difficult to take your eyes off Anna May Wong, and the other central performances, from Gilda Gray, Jameson Thomas, King Hou Chang & Cyril Ritchard are all excellent. The cinematography is exceptional, particularly for a British film of this period, the sets and settings are interesting and beautifully realised. Even the plot, which other reviewers have critiqued, is to me perfectly serviceable, with some unexpected twists at its climax. However the whole effect is ruined by a truly awful modern score by jazz pianist Neil Brand, which seems to bear no relation to the visuals whatsoever. In itself the music is a bland, unadventurous modern take on 40s-50s film noir jazz, but without a hint of the tension and excitement of even the most perfunctory noir soundtrack. Composition, performance and recording are dull as anything. Not only this though, but the dramatic power of the visuals is reduced not enhanced by the music, which meanders along in much the same vein regardless of what happens on screen. There's no eroticism and no danger, only perfunctory 'dinner jazz' which sounds as though it's being played by bored music college students. Worst of all, in the several dance scenes, which are pivotal to both the plot and the visual impact of the film, Brand can't even get his musicians to play in sync with the dancers; the effect of which is to make the performers look at best strange and at worst comical, when they should be engaging, and in Ann May Wong's case enchanting.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By C. O. DeRiemer HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on 17 July 2009
Format: DVD
There are three reasons to watch Piccadilly, a 1929 British silent backstage melodrama. The performance of Anna May Wong is primary. She's a knockout as Shosho, a Chinese dishwasher in a posh London nightclub who gets a chance to show how she can dance, and then becomes a star. Wong is so charismatic, so fine a performer and so confident an actress, that you might wonder whatever happened to her. But there's more to Piccadilly than Wong. Perhaps not too much, but enough to enjoy the passing parade of dated movie choreography and the moody atmosphere of transplanted German expressionism. The downside is the story...one of those behind-the-scenes melodramas of entertainers and impresarios, stilted and dated, filled with tremulous glances, suspicious glares, clutched hankies and faces turned away.

Valentine Wilmot (Jameson Thomas) owns the Piccadilly Club, the poshest of the posh, where the sophisticates of London crème de la crème, dressed to the nines, come to dance and dine, and to watch Mabel & Vic, "London's Greatest Dance Attraction." Wilmot is a tough, smooth, perfectionist. He made the Piccadilly what it is. He discovered Mabel Greenfield (Gilda Gray) and made stars out of her and her dance partner, Vic Smiles (Cyril Ritchard). While he appreciates Mabel's talents, his nightclub comes first. Mabel really loves the guy and Vic really loves Mabel. ("My dear, I'm simply mad about you!") One night a diner is given a dirty plate. He makes a scene; Wilmot is furious and storms into the kitchen and scullery. There he sees Shosho, dancing on a table for the other workers when she should have been washing dishes. He fires her. Then he has second thoughts. Shosho has something that the impresario in Wilmot tells him might make a star attraction...exotic, sensuous, unusual.
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