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Piano Concertos, The (Litton, Dallas So) [Hybrid SACD, SACD]

Stephen Hough, Stephen Hough Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Product details

  • Audio CD (4 Oct 2004)
  • Please Note: Requires SACD-compatible hardware
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Hybrid SACD, SACD
  • Label: Hyperion
  • ASIN: B00030NU9U
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 452,355 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. Vivace
2. Andante - Allegretto Tranquillo - Andante
3. Allegro Vivace
4. Allegro Vivace
5. Largo
6. Allegro Vivace
7. Introduction - Allegro Vivace
8. Variation I - Precedente
9. Theme - L'istesso Tempo
10. L'istesso Tempo
See all 32 tracks on this disc
Disc: 2
1. Moderato - Philadelphia Orchestra
2. Adagio Sostenuto - Philadelphia Orchestra
3. Allegro Scherzando - Philadelphia Orchestra
4. Allegro Ma Non Troppo - Philadelphia Orchestra
5. Intermezzo: Adagio - Philadelphia Orchestra
6. Finale: Alla Breve - Philadelphia Orchestra

Product Description

Review

These live concert recordings stand out in a field jam-packed with first-rate Rachmaninov concerto cycles --BBC MUSIC MAGAZINE

These are outstanding performances --CLASSIC FM MAGAZINE

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great performances, variable sound 18 Aug 2010
Format:Audio CD
One thing is for sure on this set. Musically, the performances are stunning. The pieces are shaped sensitively by Andrew Litton and accompanied most sympathetically by the Dallas Orchestra. Hough's playing is astonishingly fine throughout.

Bearing is mind that these are live rather than re-cut and assembled studio performances, some of his playing is simply phenomenal. This is not merely virtuosic, the fireworks are always there for sound musical reasons. The 3rd concerto is quite jaw-dropping, in fact. All these performances undoubtedly brought the house down. I award them a solid 5 stars.

And the sound? (SACD/stereo reviewed) The first thing to say here is that balances are generally laid back but strong architecturally, portraying quite solid and coherent staging. Unfortunately, overall levels of transparency are not always sufficient to reproduce instruments stage-rear without some clouding - see some of the better 50+ year-old Living Stereos to see how this can be done properly! Throughout this set, the piano sounds clear, vivid and dynamic, whilst things progressively fog up as stage depth increases.

Moreover, the balance and overall sound quality vary notably from performance to performance:

1 and 4 - these are characterised by a very recessed orchestra. Because low-level resolution is insufficient, this sounds a tad muffled. Strings are too thin for Rachmaninov, and a bit gritty because the recording is PCM. Four stars sonically.

Paganini Variations. Noticeably better, with a much more natural balance between orchestra and soloist. Some of the interchange between soloist and inner orchestral lines reveals very strong and coherent depth layering. Strings are still not quite right, though (PCM). 5 stars for sound.
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Amazon.com: 4.9 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
25 of 33 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wow, Love the Music, Hate the Audience Applause 19 Dec 2004
By drdanfee - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Let's get right off the bat to the down side of this otherwise superb set of recordings: audience noise. Now thank goodness this audience is very quiet during the progress of these performances, recorded live in the Meyerson Center in Dallas, USA; but as the dying echoes of each final chord in each of the first four piano concertos washes back from the walls, a huge crash of applause falls upon the ears like a very cold, and hard, icy avalanche. Only the Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini was recorded without an audience, and thus mercifully, the rhapsody is blessedly free of this dreadful end to some of the very best Rachmaninoff playing ever committed to discs.

Yes, the first time you play these discs (in very clear and wide-frequency super audio sound, by the way), the applause offers up that added live concert frisson of the Meyerson audience being electrified by performances which would deserve every minute of sustained and raucous applause that any audience anywhere might care to offer up in appreciation. After that first time around, however, you simply wish more and more and more, to exile that audience to any Siberia, any far and distant and life threatening tundra available, just so long as it's palm-smacking look-at-us-now cacophony is no longer shattering against the walls of your listening room like demolition for a new Walmart down the block. Super audio's sonic power and refinement, on offer in multiple surround channels, only makes these intrusive applause endings that much more noisome. If you turn up the system, as I did, to more fully immerse yourself in each of the passing fine nuances as well as the entirely apt forward sweep of these performances, you will only be more painfully and frustratingly punished at the end of each work.

So, we have a possible major, major, major problem in this set, thanks to this audience at the end, every end, every piano concerto, one through four.

Otherwise these performances stand as pillars of fresh, committed, and thoroughly rewarding music-making. The pianist Stephen Hough, of course, is no stranger to worthwhile musicianship. A while back he was awarded a MacArthur Foundation Prize, and this survey of the Rachmaninoff piano concertos only continues the genius that the prize is intended to support. The Dallas Symphony is led by Andrew Litton, their current music director. The orchestra members, the conductor, and the pianist are one with the sweep and enormous melody which the composer has written into these scores. Though he showcases piano writing, leaving few passages when the pianist in his concertos is entirely silent for long; Rachmaninoff writes many little duets ... so deft, so tricky to put together and still make musical sense, both close and large .... throughout each movement, where the keyboard is companioned by woodwinds, or strings or brass. Keeping the fabric balanced is not as easy as it may appear from the ease with which the Dallas orchestra departments play; and people need to highlight and fade as quickly as the music evolves and shifts, moving on. As a set this one goes to the prime shelf where current interests are held. The only other sets to rise this high musically so far are the composer's own ... beautifully remastered in the Naxos budget editions; and the deleted complete set by Vladimir Ashkenazy with Bernard Haitink leading the Philharmonia (London) and the Concertgebouw; and the Peter Rosl and Kurt Sanderling set with the outstanding Berlin Symphony.

Individually, other performances of single concertos also seem to belong on this most highly esteemed Rachmaninoff shelf. In the first concerto, Vardan Mamikonian gives a stunning performance, supported by the Frankfort Radio Orchestra led by David Stahl. The same disc includes an equally intense performance of the Liszt first piano concerto. In the second concerto, I have long cherished Russian pianist Yevgeny Kissin, with Valergy Gergiev leading the London Symphony on BMG. Their pacing is exemplary, and I think this disc of the second concerto is one of the best things Kissin has given us so far.

The third concerto has been recorded by so many very good players that it is more difficult to select the most musically outstanding single versions. In addition to the other complete sets mentioned, I would perhaps add a deleted BMG-RCA recording with Ashkenazy partnered by the Philadelphia Orchestra under Eugene Ormandy. Their unaminity of musical purpose lights fire in each and every bar, putting to shame the familiar saw that Ormandy could only make beautiful music that stayed on the surface of the many works he recorded over a long career. Ashkenazy has recorded lots of Rachmaninoff, too, in a long career; and this deleted disc of the third concerto is among the peaks in his great catalogue. Arkady Volodos is at least the equal of the old, famous Horowitz recording, and the super audio sound is very high quality.

No one who loves the fourth concerto will be willing to part with the famed Michelangeli recording, now available in a Great Performances EMI edition. In my opinion the sole equal of the Rhapsody would be the Pletnev one on Virgin EMI, with Libor Pesek leading the Philharmonia.

To finish the lot, I strongly recommend the ORIGINAL versions of the first and fourth concertos, with Ashkenazy leading the Helsinki Philharmonic, and Alexander Ghindin doing a smash-up, young man's reading of both concertos. After listening to the original versions, you may agree with me that the composer tightened up each work, at the cost of losing some very lovely music. Highly recommended, five stars for performance. Hate the audience reaction in all four concertos, just hate it, no stars. Only a act of sheer willful determination keeps their applause in the airtight container of historical interest, where surely their applause belongs.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A chip off the old block, but still his own man... 11 Nov 2008
By Peter Barach - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
These performances reminded me of the composer's own in their unsentimental and unceasing movement forward. But although they are cut from similar cloth, Hough is not merely imitating Rachmaninoff. The sentiment in this music is in the notes, and it does not need swooning and editorializing (e.g., Lang Lang) to involve the listener. Litton and the orchestra are active collaborators. On CD, the sound is a little bright and at the same time a little thick--imaging isn't its strength. Maybe the SACD is better-=I haven't heard it.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great performances, variable sound 18 Aug 2010
By J. S. Bower - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
One thing is for sure on this set. Musically, the performances are stunning. The pieces are shaped sensitively by Andrew Litton and accompanied most sympathetically by the Dallas Orchestra. Hough's playing is astonishingly fine throughout.

Bearing is mind that these are live rather than re-cut and assembled studio performances, some of his playing is simply phenomenal. This is not merely virtuosic, the fireworks are always there for sound musical reasons. The 3rd concerto is quite jaw-dropping, in fact. All these performances undoubtedly brought the house down. I award them a solid 5 stars.

And the sound? (SACD/stereo reviewed) The first thing to say here is that balances are generally laid back but strong architecturally, portraying quite solid and coherent staging. Unfortunately, overall levels of transparency are not always sufficient to reproduce instruments stage-rear without some clouding - see some of the better 50+ year-old Living Stereos to see how this can be done properly! Throughout this set, the piano sounds clear, vivid and dynamic, whilst things progressively fog up as stage depth increases.

Moreover, the balance and overall sound quality vary notably from performance to performance:

1 and 4 - these are characterised by a very recessed orchestra. Because low-level resolution is insufficient, this sounds a tad muffled. Strings are too thin for Rachmaninov, and a bit gritty because the recording is PCM. Four stars sonically.

Paganini Variations. Noticeably better, with a much more natural balance between orchestra and soloist. Some of the interchange between soloist and inner orchestral lines reveals very strong and coherent depth layering. Strings are still not quite right, though (PCM). 5 stars for sound.

2 - Good balance again between soloist and orchestra. However, this is also the least transparent recording. Although everything is there structurally, instruments beyond mid-stage become progressively more clouded; the overall effect is actually quite soft and rolled-off tonally. 4 stars for sound

3 - Similar to 2 in overall balance, but -unnacountably - much more transparent. The greater resolution means that the rear-stage 'fog' in 2 is replaced by clear air. Also the most natural sounding strings. 5 stars for sound.

I have no idea why this variability is so obvious. Miking or post-processing, perhaps?

Don't get me wrong, the sound varies from good to excellent. But it could have been great.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The SACD is out of Print. What a shame 8 Mar 2012
By H. M. Moser - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Sometimes you luck out in this otherwise cruel world. I have the SACD version which I understand is no longer available. This may be the single greatest CD in my library, and no amount of money could get me to ever part with it.

Hyperion should reissue the SACD at once. But this time include the center channel.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A "Must Buy" set of the Rachmaninov piano concertos 5 Dec 2007
By Hannibal - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Let me be brief. - If you love the piano, if you love piano concertos, and most of all, if you love Rachmaninov, this is an essential purchase.

It is true that we have been blessed with great sets by Zoltan Kocis and Earl Wild in the past, and anyone wishing to spend less than what this set goes for should be more than happy with one of those, BUT this has terrific SACD sound which delivers Rachmaninov's music in all its glory - and as only SACD can - and musically, Stephen Hough fully challenges the benchmarks for individual performances that have been set by Horowitz, Argerich, Janis and Kapell.

To sum up, there are many great performances of Rachmaninov's concertos and the Paganini Rhapsody out there, but for a complete collection SACD tips the balance to Hough - (despite the irritating applause, pointed out by a previous reviewer)... Get it!
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