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Phil's Spectre: A Wall of Soundalikes CD


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Phil's Spectre: A Wall of Soundalikes + Phil's Spectre II: Another Wall Of Soundalikes + Phil's Spectre III: A Third Wall Of Soundalikes
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Product details

  • Audio CD (6 Oct 2003)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Ace Records
  • ASIN: B0000C3HHW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 182,744 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. When You Walk in the Room - Jackie DeShannon
2. Run, Run, Run - The Supremes
3. Just You - Sonny and Cher
4. Why Do Fools Fall in Love - The Beach Boys
5. Too Hurt to Cry, Too Much in Love to Say Goodbye - The Darnells
6. On The Spanish Side - The Corsairs
7. Hang On - Wall of Sound
8. Tremblin' - Gene Pitney
9. A Little Love (Will Go A Long Way) - Alder Ray
10. All Strung Out - April Stevens
11. Then The Boy's Happy (The Girl's Happy Too) - The Four Pennies
12. (You're My) Soul and Inspiration - The Righteous Brothers
13. You're So Fine - Dorothy Berry
14. Missin' My Baby - Clydie King
15. It Breaks My Heart - Ray Raymond
16. Yes Sir, That's My Baby - Hale
17. Love Her - The Walker Brothers
18. And That Reminds Me - The Dolls
19. Boys Town (Where My Broken Hearted Buddies Go) - Nino Tempo
20. My Baby Looks, But He Don't Touch - Carol Connors
See all 24 tracks on this disc

Product Description

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Lozarithm VINE VOICE on 29 Nov 2005
Format: Audio CD
Phil Spector was a millionaire at the age of 23, after producing 15 hits in a row, including classics by the Ronettes and the Crystals. He had his own record label, Philles, and was the creator of his trademark Wall Of Sound, usually manufactured at the Gold Star Studios in Hollywood, with a crack team of musicians including the Wrecking Crew and a host of session singers. As an auteur producer, probably the first of the breed, he was the acknowledged master, and his success engendered a whole genre of other groups and performers from New York to Los Angeles, like the Chiffons and the Shangri-Las, whose producers tried to emulate the sound and the success of the young svengali. 
This collection brilliantly demonstrates some of the most notable efforts, with "many tracks reissued legally for the first time", as it says on the back. Spector wasn't easy to work with and the number of former acolytes who left the fold and set up in competition to try to beat him at his own game is almost a genre in itself: Sonny and Cher, the Righteous Brothers, Nino Tempo and April Stevens, Carol Connors and the writers Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich are all included here.
Rival companies such as Motown weren't above experimenting with the Spector sound in the early days, and there are two examples, one by the Supremes and one featuring the great Gladys Horton, moonlighting from the Marvelettes. For some, emulating Spector was a form of homage and tribute, as with Brian Wilson, whose own style developed from studying Phil Spector. His girl group productions were often pastiche, while the Beach Boys' Spectorish version of Why Do Fools Fall In Love? was probably inspired by Ronnie (later Ronnie Spector) of the Ronettes' love of the Frankie Lymon original.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
very good collection of recordings from a multiple of producers and artist that attempted to write, sing and record just as the man himself did. Some fall short others similar, none exactly as good but all great fun to listen to.
This was a hard series to put together as I get from the horse's mouth of the label that made it all possible. Licensing and permissions and who owns what now must have been a nightmare.
But here it all is in a 3 vol series of record/cds and worth every penny you spend on some very obscure stuff.
good transfers of the masters to this compilation as well. It really added to my knowledge bank of sixty's tunes.
Loved every minute.
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1 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Richard on 15 April 2008
Format: Audio CD
Phil Spector was at least a man with Luck on his side and had a great knack of copying others.Whci began the day he heard the Aquatones.
I don't mind I love it.I like copycats.I like cover versions.
Obviously Spector would never admit to it about his Aquatones copy but its a nice touch that the reformed group recently did a cover of To know him is to love him.
As for the Wall of Sound he never admitted where that came from.Try the Carmina Burana
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Ace album of Phil Spector Wall of Soundalikes 30 Dec 2003
By hyperbolium - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This isn't the first CD to catalog pop songs that were influenced by Phil Spector's revolutionary "Wall of Sound" production technique, but it's certainly among the best. Unlike grey-market items such as the three-volume Japanese "Touch the Wall of Sound" (reissued as a triple-disc in the past few years), this is a sanctioned release, and the ear-popping quality of the masters (including true stereo for tracks 1-2, 9-10, and 12) tells the tale.
It's really no surprise to anyone familiar with Spector's landmark singles of the early-60s that his sound had far reaching influence. It was borrowed by many of his partners, assistants and former artists, such as arranger Jack Nitzsche, go-fer Sonny Bono, former Teddy Bear bandmate Marshall Lieb, and Righteous Brother Bill Medley. Nitzsche's production of "When You Walk in the Room" builds up layers of guitars, percussion and strings in support of Jackie DeShannon's impassioned vocal. It's truly amazing that this brilliant record had little commercial success and has been all but totally eclipsed in the public consciousness by the Searchers hit cover. At least DeShannon collected songwriter's royalties! Bono's 1965 recording with Cher of "Just You" is filled with Spectorian touches of glockenspiel, strings and the underlying Wall of Sound. Lieb's "A Little Love (Will Go a Long Way)" (co-penned by `60s stalwart Gary Zekley) sounds as much like a Darlene Love tune as anything Love actually recorded; but it's not - it's Alder Ray on lead, with Love guiding the backing vocals. Medley helmed the Righteous Brothers kickoff single for Verve (having split with Spector), Mann & Weil's "(You're My) Soul and Inspiration," and showed that the duo's sound was as much their own as Spector's.
Spector's sound had its impact at more of a distance, as well. Early efforts by the Supremes often sounded more like Brill Building girl-group productions than Motown's trademark soul sound. Other early Motown acts like The Darnells were also treated to the percussion and vocal layers of The Wall of Sound. More famously, Beach Boys mastermind Brian Wilson was a thorough Spector devotee. The group's take on Frankie Lymon's "Why Do Fools Fall in Love" marries the Beach Boys' multipart harmonies to the shifting backing of Spector's wall.
Mick Patrick's song-by-song liner notes are wonderfully informative, providing valuable background on both the better-known and obscure sides that helps place these tracks in context with Spector's own work. Vintage photos, picture sleeve and 7" label reproductions flesh out a superb booklet for a wonderfully curated disc.
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
The Sincerest Form Of Flattery 29 Nov 2005
By Lozarithm - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Phil Spector was a millionaire at the age of 23, after producing 15 hits in a row, including classics by the Ronettes and the Crystals. He had his own record label, Philles, and was the creator of his trademark Wall Of Sound, usually manufactured at the Gold Star Studios in Hollywood, with a crack team of musicians including the Wrecking Crew and a host of session singers. As an auteur producer, probably the first of the breed, he was the acknowledged master, and his success engendered a whole genre of other groups and performers from New York to Los Angeles, like the Chiffons and the Shangri-Las, whose producers tried to emulate the sound and the success of the young svengali. 

This collection brilliantly demonstrates some of the most notable efforts, with "many tracks reissued legally for the first time", as it says on the back. Spector wasn't easy to work with and the number of former acolytes who left the fold and set up in competition to try to beat him at his own game is almost a genre in itself: Sonny and Cher, the Righteous Brothers, Nino Tempo and April Stevens, Carol Connors and the writers Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich are all included here.

Rival companies such as Motown weren't above experimenting with the Spector sound in the early days, and there are two examples, one by the Supremes and one featuring the great Gladys Horton, moonlighting from the Marvelettes. For some, emulating Spector was a form of homage and tribute, as with Brian Wilson, whose own style developed from studying Phil Spector. His girl group productions were often pastiche, while the Beach Boys' Spectorish version of Why Do Fools Fall In Love? was probably inspired by Ronnie (later Ronnie Spector) of the Ronettes' love of the Frankie Lymon original. The Walker Brothers also owed a debt to Spector for the sound on their British hits, of which the first, Love Her, chosen here, was arranged by one of Spector's right hand men, Jack Nitzsche.

The Chiffons appear in their extra Spector-like guise as the Four Pennies on the chart-storming, if non-PC, Barry/Greenwich song When The Boy's Happy (The Girl's Happy Too), and there is a wonderful Wall Of Sound transformation of the Falcon's You're So Fine by Dorothy Berry, the wife of Richard Berry, who went on to become one of Ray Charles' Raelettes. One of the groups included even call themselves The Wall Of Sound, whilst another proclaims itself A Spectra Production. Every track has earned its place on this fascinating glimpse at some of the impact Spector had on the music scene between 1963 and 1967
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Essential for fans of Spector and Sixties pop/rock 30 Nov 2003
By ACJ - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
It's an odd title, and an odd concept - the kind that's usually the basis for bootleg or "collectors-only" albums. But this is all legal, and all magnificent. Although Phil Spector himself isn't involved in any of these tracks, many of his compadres (Jack Nitzsche, Nino Tempo, Sonny Bono, Carol Connors) are. In my opinion, anyone who seriously enjoys Spector's work, or Sixties pop/rock in general, should have this CD right next to their copy of Spector's "Back to Mono" box set. Which reminds me of the album's one flaw - some of the tracks included here in stereo would have been better off in mono, especially Nino & April's "All Strung Out." But that's a minor quibble with an otherwise near-perfect collection.
9 of 13 people found the following review helpful
There is a better Beach Boys cover of Spector's work 4 May 2005
By Robert Workman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
A better selection from the Beach Boys would have been "I Can Hear Music", certainly the definitive Spector cover. It easily bests the original while keeping its spirit intact. It doesn't merely ape Spectre; it becomes its own work. There's no denying the Spector influence on the Beach Boys, particularly Brian, but "I Can Hear Music" is an example of how Brian and the group assimilated, then surpassed, Spectre's technique. "Why Do Fools Fall in Love" is a slight piece of filler from the group's early days that doesn't display the group's prowess in the studio at its best and is a pretty weak tribute to Spector as well (likewise the group's cover of "Then I Kissed Her", thankfully overlooked for this collection.)
Excellent 12 Mar 2011
By Sasha - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Terrific and exciting compilation of music inspired by mad genius Phil Spector ,famous for creating legendary "Wall of Sound".
Everything is here - from big hits,curiosities and one-offs to pure copies of Spector's work,ist of performers reads like "Who's who" of 1960s pop - Beach boys,Supremes,Jackie DeShannon,Walker brothers,Sonny & Cher... all of them recorded singles tat echoed Spector's megalomaniac vision,that particular brand of symphonic pop,grandeur that bursted out of transistor speakers.

As expected,it is not hits but lesser known gems that shines best - "On the spanish side" by The Corsairs,"It breaks my heart" by Ray Raymonds and "My baby looks but he don't touch" by Carol Conners - and almost any of these glorious oddities that sounds as good as big hits (if not even better). There is even a single "Please Phil Spector" that humorously shows how everybody expected Spector to have Mida's touch.

Personally, I worship Spector's 1960s work and always get totally swept away with his music .
Because his discography is after all,limited, compilations like this are welcome for Spector hungry fans and if they release one each year I would be the first one to buy them.
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