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Philip's Universal Atlas of the World (Philips Atlas) Hardcover – 7 Jun 2010


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Hardcover, 7 Jun 2010
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Philip's (7 Jun 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849071241
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849071246
  • Product Dimensions: 39.6 x 29.8 x 4.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,038,672 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

With the publication of the Universal Atlas in October 2005, Philips finally joined the big boys, The Times Comprehensive Atlas of the World The Times Comprehensive Atlas of the World, The Rand McNally The New International Atlas,Rand McNally International Atlas, and the Russian Atlas Mira (the latter not available in this country but available from Omnimaps in the US). I gave the First Edition of the Philips Universal Atlas, a poor review, mainly due to the fact that the spine was glued as in a paperback, meaning that the atlas could not be opened out properly. Philips have rectified this problem with the Second Edition published in October 2008. It is also quite a lot thicker than the First Edition due to the use of thicker paper, a larger introductory section, and ten extra pages of mapping. This is due to the British Isles now being mapped at 1: 770,000 over 14 pages rather than 1:1,540,000 over 4 pages in the First Edition.

This atlas is basically the Philips World Atlas but with the addition of an extended section on SE Australia and New Zealand, and a massively extended section on North and Central America. At 114 pages, the section on North and Central America is far larger than in any other World Atlas (compare with the Times Comprehensive 44 pages for this section) and could be regarded as a North American Atlas in its own right. Europe is also well mapped, but the rest of the world is only average, especially compared with the other big three atlases mentioned above.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Ned Middleton HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 21 Aug 2011
The map of the world continues to evolve as new countries emerge. This is especially so with modern Europe in the years since the demise of the Soviet Union and former Yugoslavia. As all travellers and students of geography will know, up-to-date information about any country's boundaries and borders is vital. How else might one visit, say, Dubrovnik, without knowing that that city is now in Croatia and not within the boundaries of a former country which no longer exists.

Whilst all households should possess at least one Atlas of the World, the problems associated with those much larger tomes are generally a price which is often prohibitive and, secondly, there does tend to be no space for such an outsize product on the family bookshelf. Of course, the bigger the atlas, the easier it is to see and appreciate whatever information may be contained on the various maps but in this particular product we find an optimum size which suits all requirements.

Commencing with a 47 page gazetteer of nations in alphabetic order - complete with national flag, there are 96 pages of relief maps by continent, region and country, political maps, 32 pages devoted to world geography and 35,000 place names in an index which also includes local spellings. In short, this product is just about as complete as one might hope to find. As such, it also provides all the background and general information one might require when contemplating a visit or, perhaps in support of one's studies. It will also appeal to those who simply want to know the answer to some vexatious question.

NM
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Turner on 24 Aug 2010
Verified Purchase
The first thing I would like to say about this atlas is that at about 6kg and 584 pages it is 'ONE HEAVY BOOK' but once you open it you will find that this world atlas is one of the very best on the market .

I was from the start very impressed by all the wealth of information that it offers before you even get to the world maps it will take you a little while to read this I was particularly impressed by the 100 urburn and city centre maps from all the worlds major capitals and countries major cities you will not find these in other atlases in its class.

The one thing you find about the way Philip's produce their atlases is that thay are always very bright and colourful and clear to look at and the countries borders are clearly defined. I like the way they shade the various hill and mountain ranges it give their maps an almost 3D effect it make their maps all the more intresting to look at most other atlases in this class don't show this kind of detail and as a result seem rather bland and less informertive.

I read that a previous reviewer criticised that the map distribution was a bit uneven I do agree with him a little but the way they have produced this atlas is that they have divided up the mapping pages between the continents so some countries get more coverage than others ie like the U.S.A.yes Russia could have been a little better represented but I find this is only a small criticism and does not detract too much from the overal presentation of this fine and impressively put together publication also at 290 mapping pages alone very few other atlases offer this much coverage.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
First Class World Atlas 14 Feb 2011
By Stephen Turner - Published on Amazon.com
The first thing I would like to say about this atlas is that at about 6kg and 584 pages it is 'ONE HEAVY BOOK' but once you open it you will find that this world atlas is one of the very best on the market .

I was from the start very impressed by all the wealth of information that it offers before you even get to the world maps it will take you a little while to read this I was particularly impressed by the 100 urburn and city centre maps from all the worlds major capitals and countries major cities you will not find these in other atlases in its class.

The one thing you find about the way Philip's produce their atlases is that thay are always very bright and colourful and clear to look at and the countries borders are clearly defined. I like the way they shade the various hill and mountain ranges it give their maps an almost 3D effect it make their maps all the more intresting to look at most other atlases in this class don't show this kind of detail and as a result seem rather bland and less informertive.

I read that a previous reviewer criticised that the map distribution was a bit uneven I do agree with him a little but the way they have produced this atlas is that they have divided up the mapping pages between the continents so some countries get more coverage than others ie like the U.S.A.yes Russia could have been a little better represented but I find this is only a small criticism and does not detract too much from the overal presentation of this fine and impressively put together publication also at 290 mapping pages alone very few other atlases offer this much coverage.

Other atlases in its class like the 'Times Concise Atlas of the World' may offer more place names for example the above has 146,000 but the only way you can browse the maps is that I find you will need a magnifying glass to read the place names clearly and overal the atlas seems a little cluttered.

The Philip's 'Universal Atlas of the World' may have only 120,000 place names but most people will be able to read them clearly with glasses or the naked eye and all the countries major towns and cities are well represented in it.

I would like to add that this atlas is first class and I would highly recommend it to anyone it would be an asset to any home I hope it will give me many years of enjoyment to come.

Stephen Turner

Ash Green Surrey

United Kingdom
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