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Phantoms of Remembrance: Memory and Oblivion at the End of the First Millennium Hardcover – 6 Nov 1994


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press (6 Nov 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691034222
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691034225
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 16.5 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,010,119 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

"Moving from general to particular, the author uses three case-studies to depict local patterns of memory.... Geary states his thesis with clarity ... [and] throw[s] light into the most elusive recesses of not just 'the past,' but of processes still going on, in and around us, in 1995."--Alexander Murray, The Times Literary Supplement

"[A] fascinating, deeply learned, and meticulous study.... This thoughtful book ... raises important questions pertinent to all periods."--Virginia Quarterly Review

From the Inside Flap

"A strikingly original study of the ways in which men and women of the eleventh century recorded, interpreted, and used their memories of the past. . . . [Geary] has made a significant contribution to our understanding of [this] period but to the wider discipline of medieval studies."--Thomas Head, Washington University, St. Louis


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First Sentence
THE NEW PAST forged in the eleventh century by Rodulfus Glaber, Arnold of Regensburg, and their contemporaries, with its emphasis on radical discontinuity, is an enduring creation: its central outlines, accepted and elaborated upon by subsequent medieval generations, have been largely accepted by modern historians. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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0 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 18 Mar 1999
Format: Paperback
Perhaps the book is too specialized for me as amateur history-enthusiast (although i found this book via a recommended reading for 1st year history students). I found this book tedious and often did not have much of an idea what point the author was trying to make here. I liked his discussion of the role of women and monasteries as institutionalized memory of medieval society.
I am curious to see what others found of this book. I, for one, will not read this book again.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
A sophisticated discussion of the creation of "history" 14 Oct 1999
By Lois Huneycutt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I found this book to be very stimulating and very creatively framed -- perhaps a bit too creatively, in a few cases. An important addition to the growing literature on medieval narrative/memory. Recommended for specialists, although the prose is quite engaging, one often feels as if one is coming in on a private conversation among practicing medievalists.
3 of 12 people found the following review helpful
some interesting points, generally difficult to read 18 Mar 1999
By Willem Noe - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Perhaps the book is too specialized for me as amateur history-enthusiast (although i found this book via a recommended reading for 1st year history students). I found this book tedious and often did not have much of an idea what point the author was trying to make here. I liked his discussion of the role of women and monasteries as institutionalized memory of medieval society.
I am curious to see what others found of this book. I, for one, will not read this book again.
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