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Wars, Pestilence and the Surgeon's Blade. The Evolution of British Military Medicine and Surgery During the Nineteenth Century. (Helion Studies in Military History) Hardcover – Illustrated, 7 Feb 2014

4 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Helion & Company (7 Feb. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1909384097
  • ISBN-13: 978-1909384095
  • Product Dimensions: 3.2 x 14.6 x 24.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,075,006 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

A stimulating and informative work on an important subject. Soldiers of the Queen --Soldiers of the Queen

I enjoyed the engaging style; learnt much, and recommend this important book to the general reader interested in British military history. --British Journal for Military History

I looked forward to reading this one. I was not disappointed … Anyone with an interest in medical history, or military history, will be interested in this fascinating book. --Surgeon's News. The magazine of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh

One of the real strengths of this book lies in the attention that it draws to the plight of the soldier in undertaking his trade … The production value of this book is superb. … It is noteworthy … for how readable and accessible the authors have made this subject to the reading audience. Scotland and Heys are outstanding medical historians and are to be commended for their work in this book. -- Canadian Military History Journal

I would recommend this book to the military historian as a means of acquiring an insight into military medicine and the Army Medical Services in the 19th Century. -- Journal of the Society for Army Historical Research

About the Author

Tom Scotland was brought up in Elie in the East Neuk of Fife and went to Waid Academy in Anstruther. He graduated in Medicine from the University of Edinburgh in 1971 and pursued a career in surgery, becoming a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh in 1975. He specialised in orthopaedic surgery, and trained in Aberdeen and Toronto before taking up the post of Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon with Grampian Health Board and Honorary Senior Lecturer, University of Aberdeen. His particular interests were knee surgery, children's orthopaedics and tumour surgery. He was lead clinician for the Scottish Sarcoma Managed Clinical Network for three years leading up to his retirement in 2007. Since retiring Tom has been made an Honorary Senior Lecturer of the University of Aberdeen and has reinvented himself as an orthopaedic military historian. He has co-edited a book, published in 2012, entitled "War Surgery 1914-18" with his co-author in this current venture, Steve Heys, and has given many lectures on the history of military surgery. The University of Aberdeen has strong military connections and can claim as its own Sir James McGrigor who was the Duke of Wellington`s Chief Medical Officer in the Peninsular War and who subsequently became Director General of Army Medical Services. Tom pays tribute in this work to one of Aberdeen`s most famous sons. Steve heys was born in Accrington and was educated in England, Australia and Scotland. He graduated in Medicine from the University of Aberdeen in 1981 and undertook his surgical training in the North East of Scotland. He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, Glasgow and England and underwent research training in the Rowett Research Institute in Aberdeen, obtaining a PhD in 1992. He specialised in general and breast cancer surgery for many years before latterly concentrating on breast cancer together with his research interests in the role of nutrition in the causation of cancer. Steve has published more than 200 scientific papers, has written many book chapters on different aspects of surgery and has played many national and international roles in surgery and the provision of surgical services. Steve joins forces with Tom as co-author of this work which explores the development of surgery during the nineteenth and early twentieth century. As Professor of Cancer Surgery at the University of Aberdeen, as well as a former member of the RAMC (V) in the 51st Highland Brigade for 6 years, Steve too is conscious of the major contribution made by Sir James McGrigor both to Army Medical Services and to the University of Aberdeen where McGrigor co-founded the Aberdeen Medical Society and which he supported throughout his long and illustrious career.


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Format: Hardcover
This volume, written by experts in orthopaedic and general surgery, attempts to describe the advances in military medicine, especially surgery, throughout the nineteenth century. This is a considerable task and the authors are to be congratulated on the manner in which they have achieved their goal. The focus is predominantly on the British experience, but the important American Civil War, Franco-Prussian War and Russo- Japanese War (of 1904-5 and therefore a twentieth century conflict) are by no means neglected. The huge contribution of Sir James McGrigor - the father of British Military Medicine- and the development of anaesthesia are particularly well described. There is much detail with relevant statistical data.

This book should be of great interest to both laymen and medics and is highly recommended.
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Format: Hardcover
This is an outstanding book on a fascinating subject. Eloquently written, well researched and comprehensive, it is accessible to the non-medical reader of military history, while providing a fascinating retrospective account of the relatively recent developments in surgical practice that have shaped the profession into its modern form. Highly recommended.
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Format: Hardcover
From the authors of War Surgery 1914-18, another tour-de-force. Expertly researched and beautifully written, it illuminates the development of British military medicine and surgery. It is comprehensive and easy to read. This is a valuable addition to the genre and will be welcomed both by medical and non-medical readers. I would thoroughly recommend this book.
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Format: Hardcover
Apart from one lengthy quotation, almost every line of the brief coverage of Mary Seacole (pp 236-38) is factually wrong, and in some cases, where there is no factual error, the context is badly missed. The documentation, as well, is shoddy--the only direct source of Seacole’s work cited is her own Wonderful Adventures of Mrs Seacole in Many Lands, more careful use of which could have avoided many of the errors. References here are to that book.
On Seacole’s background, her father was probably not a “Scottish military officer,” for she called him a “soldier,” while her mother was hardly a “black Jamaican,” but a mixed-race Creole, a distinction important to her (1-2). The portrait used shows her wearing 3 medals, none of which she won, although she did wear medals, sometimes even 4. You claim one medal for her, the Crimea Medal. But it was a service medals strictly for the military. No woman ever won one. There is no evidence that Seacole’s husband was a relative of Lord Nelson, as claimed--Seacole called him a godson of, but there is no evidence of that either.
Seacole never “established a boarding house in Jamaica to treat victims of a cholera epidemic,” but inherited the boarding house her mother owned, and continued to operate it. Guests with illnesses could stay there, but it was neither a hospital nor nursing home. She had no “experience as a nurse working alongside doctors,” or presumably we would have heard of it. When she assisted cholera victims in Panama, she noted that there was no doctor to treat them--a dentist only at first, then the next doctor to come was inexperienced (25).
Seacole did assist “victims of cholera and yellow fever,” but claimed not one success with the latter (59-64), and limited success with the former.
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