Persuasion 1 Season 2009

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Season 1
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(208) IMDb 7.6/10
Available on Prime

1. Persuasion - Episode 1 PARENTAL_GUIDANCE

Rupert Penry-Jones and Sally Hawkins star in an adaptation of Jane Austen's classic novel.

Starring:
Sally Hawkins, Rupert Penry-Jones
Runtime:
1 hour 32 minutes

Persuasion - Episode 1

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Adrian Shergold
Starring Sally Hawkins, Rupert Penry-Jones
Supporting actors Alice Krige
Season year 2009
Network BBC Worldwide
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

255 of 266 people found the following review helpful By Schneehase VINE VOICE on 20 April 2007
Format: DVD
I agree with other reviewers on this version; it's not as faithful to the book (and therefore as 'good') as the Ciaran Hinds/Amanda Root version that was out a couple of years ago.
My gripes are:
1. The conversation Anne has with Captain Harville at the end of the book is the moment at which Captain Wentworth realises there is still hope. To have put that earlier in the play, addressed to Captain Benwick AND with no chance of Captain Wentworth overhearing was a pointless bit of interference with the storyline on the part of the writers and one that made no sense and made it harder for the characters to be reconciled at the end.
2. Some of the minor characters were, frankly, terrible. Mary was one of the worst - watch the Ciaran Hinds/Amanda Root version for the best way to play Mary. The actress in that was superb; this actress was very odd. Mr Elliot was wooden and that's about the best I can say for that actor - really terrible. He said his lines as though he had learned them by rote and had no idea what they meant.
3. What on earth did the script writers think they were doing having Anne rushing around Bath in pursuit of Captain Wentworth at the end and then brazenly telling him she accepted his proposal?!? Wrong, all wrong from the point of view of the storyline, characters and period of time the novel was set. No wonder he took so long to kiss her - he was probably repenting his decision to marry such a shameless hussy!
4. Then to crown it all; CAPTAIN WENTWORTH BOUGHT KELLYNCH HALL AT THE END!!!!!! What fairytale world was the writer living in??? He couldn't have done that as it was destined for the evil Mr Elliot and all tied up with legal entails...
Things that were right;
1. Rupert Penry-Jones. Phwoar!!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Lizzi S on 15 April 2008
Format: DVD
Yes, it's not the most accurate, and Anne running about Bath at the end, is very annoying, but this adaptation seems to capture the tension between Captain Wentworth and Anne Elliot excellently. You can't help but be moved by it. Anthony Head is magnificent and Rupert Penry Jones, well, it is worth watching for him alone! He definitely gives Colin Firth's Mr Darcy a run for his money.

I gave it 4 stars as it left me sobbing at the end, so obviously captured the essence of the book, however I am continually baffled why programme makers feel they have to mess around with Jane Austen's stories so much. Some changes I can understand but others just leave me scratching my head.
We love Jane Austen's stories as they are ... if it aint broke, don't fix it!!!!!!!!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By John F. Haskell on 18 April 2009
Format: DVD
While I think that the actress who plays Anne is not as pretty as she might be, the Captain is, I think, appropriately cautious and naive. I think this version is beautifully done but rather skimps on the
text a bit. Of course, the book itself leaves a lot of the "intrigue" of the young Mr Elliot and the vanity
of the older to ones imaginations (as they are seen and described by Anne after all) I did think that
the role played by Anne's friend was rather downplayed. I did not like her "running through Bath" after
the Captain, either. Seemed rather un lady-like, as much as you would want her to make sure
she gets him. His smile is worth the whole DVE.
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89 of 96 people found the following review helpful By Shady Tree VINE VOICE on 7 April 2007
Format: DVD
Firstly let me say that it has just occurred to me to wonder whether I'm biased against this version of Persuasion in favour of the 1995 Amanda Root/Ciaran Hinds version simply because I saw that one first and have loved it ever since; similarly I much prefer the BBC's version of Pride and Prejudice to the more recent film, so maybe that which we see first, we love best? That aside, I tried to watch this production of Persuasion with an open mind, particularly looking forward to Rupert Penry-Jones' portrayal of the very attractive Captain Wentworth.

In that respect, I was not disappointed; you could not hope for a more handsome leading man; what a beauty. I could even forgive Anne Elliot's uncharacteristic chase scene as she ran full pelt around Bath looking for Captain Wentworth; if my lost love looked like Rupert Penry-Jones I think I'd be persuaded to leg it around Bath in hot pursuit. But even so, it is uncharacteristic of Anne's restrained and resigned character which was portrayed so much more accurately by Amanda Root in the 1995 BBC version. A previous reviewer said that they felt Amanda Root and Ciaran Hinds too old but let's not forget that in Jane Austen's time 27 was almost heading towards middle age, and Anne would have been considered very much "on the shelf" by that age.

I thought that the casting of Sally Hawkins was very good but in a way there was not enough contrast between the pale, plain Anne at the beginning of the book and the radiant blooming Anne at the end; she was just reasonably pretty throughout.

The ITV have also fallen for the old chestnut of dumbing down the script when there is really no need and from that perspective the BBC have always been streets ahead in their scriptwriting skills.
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By April79marie on 6 April 2007
Format: DVD
It's been a while since I watched this TV adaptation of Jane Austen's last (and maybe more personal) novel, "Persuasion".
And I watched it last night, I fell in love with it all over again!

First of all, the story is absolutely breathtaking. Jane Austen wrote it when she was dying, so the novel became a kind of race against time. But the style is really fantastic. The story is about 2 people , Anne Elliot and Captain Frederick Wentworth, who unexpectedly meet again after being separated for eight years. Eight years ago, Anne and Wentworth fell deeply in love with each other ("there were no two hearts so open") but as Wentworth had no money and nothing to recommand himself, Anne's father and Lady Russel, Anne's deceased mother's friend, persuaded Anne to refuse his proposal, on account of Anne being too young and of Wentworth being pennyless.
The story starts in this adaptation when Captain Wentworth successfully returns to the country from the war, having made a fortune in the Navy, with the intention of living peacefully and of finding a wife. They meet again unexpectedly when Anne's father, a heavy spender has to let the family house, Kellynch Hall, to the Crofts who happen to be closely related to Wentworth.
Anne has never forgotten Wenworth and although she has received other proposals from elligible men, she is still unmarried at the age of 27 and still regrets having refused to marry Wentworth. He, on the other hand, shows he has never forgiven Anne and looks determined not to renew any kinds of relations with her...
For me, this adaptation beautifully recreates this wonderful love story!
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