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Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood & The Story of a Return: v. 1 & v. 2 Paperback – 6 Jul 2006


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Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood & The Story of a Return: v. 1 & v. 2 + The Complete MAUS
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Product details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Jonathan Cape (6 July 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0224080393
  • ISBN-13: 978-0224080392
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 15.2 x 2.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (61 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 108,014 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Marjane Satrapi was born in 1969 in Rasht, Iran. She now lives in Paris where she is a regular contributor to magazines and newspapers throughout the world, including the New Yorker and the New York Times. She is the author of several children's books, as well as the critically acclaimed and internationally bestselling memoir Persepolis, which has been translated into twelve languages, and was awarded the first Fernando Bueso Blanco Peace Prize in Spain. Her other books include Embroideries and Chicken With Plums.

Product Description

Review

"The magic of Marjane Satrapi's work is that it can condense a whole country's tragedy into one poignant, funny scene after another." (Natasha Walter Independent on Sunday)

"Persepolis is a stylish, clever and moving weapon of mass destruction." (David Jenkins Sunday Telegraph)

"Marjane Satrapi's books are a revelation. They're funny, they're sad, they're hugely readable. Most importantly, they remind you that the media sometimes tell you the facts but rarely tell you the truth. In one afternoon Persepolis will teach you more about Iran, about being an outsider, about being human, than you could learn from a thousand hours of television documentaries and newspaper articles. And you will remember it for a very long time." (Mark Haddon)

"I cannot praise enough Marjane Satrapi's moving account of growing up as a spirited young girl in revolutionary and war-time Iran. Persepolis is disarming and often humorous but ultimately it is shattering." (Joe Sacco)

Review

`A mordantly funny chronicle of the author's childhood in pre- and post-revolutionary Iran.'
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Kevin Hargaden on 19 Nov 2006
Format: Paperback
I am not typically a big fan of graphic novels but the work of Joe Sacco took my breath away when I was in college so it was with glee and expectation that I took this book up.

Its superb. Comics are considered juvenile. I am utterly convinced, as a result of this book, that the graphic novel is a great vehicle for discussing the most serious and sombre of topics. The contrast between the simple drawings and the complex events they represent create a balance so that you can read the saddest things without being weighed down.

That having been said, the moving tale of an independent young woman's maturation in and out of post-revolution Iran moved me to tears at some points. I have an insight into the country that countless documentaries or news articles about President Ahmadinejad or Ayatollah Khomeini couldn't give me.

I strongly recommend it to everyone. It will be an eye-opening education.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Elen Caldecott on 20 Aug 2008
Format: Paperback
This is a simply told story that touches on some very big ideas; the Islamic revolution; loyalty and family; and which boys you should fancy.
The main character is charming, naive, sympathetic and occasionally annoying - in other words, a very convincing young woman.
A fantastic read, especially if you think you don't like comic books!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By rhinoa on 10 Jan 2008
Format: Paperback
A graphic novel that serves as the autobiography of author Marjane Saptrapi. I read the complete edition which contains "The story of a childhood" and "The story of a return". Marjane Satrapi was born in 1969 in Iran during the Shah's reign. During her lifetime she has witnessed first hand the takeovwe by the Revolution, the war between Iran and Iraq and the compulsary wearing of the veil by all woman in Iran. Her parents were very liberal and she grew up with an immense curiosity and drive to speak her mind which often got her into trouble in such a strict society. At the age of 14 her parents send her alone to Austria where she goes to school but doesn't fit in. She associates with punks and nihilists where she experiments with drugs and has her first relationship which sadly doesn't end well. After spending some time living on the streets and nearly dying she decides to return home, but starts to suffer from depression when she is back. In Iran she feels like a Westener and in the Western world she feels like an Iranian so struggles to find her place.

This was an excellent novel beautifully illustrated and told with warmth and humour despite the often tragic subjects. I am not really one for politics and don't know more than the basics, but this has given me a thorough grounding in Iranian culture and the wars going on in and near by Iran. The Western view of Iran is of oppression, particularly of woman, and it was lovely to see that behind closed doors there are parties, make-up, relationships (both straight and gay) and everything pretty much the same as over here. The only difference is if caught the penalty can range from interrogation to whipping to death.

If you don't read graphic novels, I urge you not to be put off reading this as you will miss a great story and a great piece work of politics too.
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45 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Hank Ruin on 29 April 2008
Format: Paperback
This is a fantastic comic that will appeal to both comic fans & non-comic fans alike.

Despite the Amazon title, this edition "Persepolis. The Story of a Childhood and The Story of a Return" actually contains the complete Persepolis series.

"The Story of a Childhood" was original published in France as Persepolis 1 & 2, "The Story of a Return" was original published in France as Persepolis 3 & 4
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Rajat SRIVASTAVA on 9 Sep 2010
Format: Kindle Edition
This comic is unreadable on the kindle...the font is too small. Changing the text size does not change the font size of the comic
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sarah A. Brown VINE VOICE on 28 Jan 2010
Format: Paperback
This is a strikingly memorable and effective depiction of the revolution in Iran and of its impact on one young girl. Satrapi captures the uncertainty - and misplaced hope - of the early days of the revolution before charting the bewildering and most unwelcome restrictions of the new regime, particularly on women. Marjane's encounters with the stern female `Guardians of the Revolution' and her little acts of rebellion recalled (rather chillingly) the experiences of Offred in Margaret Atwood's `The Handmaid's Tale'. But, incongruously, I also found myself reminded of Posy Simmonds' cosily comic cartoons - perhaps because Marjane's father looked a little bit like George Weber. The humour of Persepolis is enjoyable but, although in one sense it lightens a potentially bleak book, it also makes the horror and tragedy Marjane experiences still more shocking.

The heroine's disorientation as she moves from Iran to Europe and then back to Iran again was depicted very well. Although she feels like a rebel in theocratic Iran, Marjane seems prim and earnest to the bohemian young people she meets in Austria. I was expecting the reverse to happen once she moved back to Tehran. But her Iranian girlfriends, obsessed with the forbidden delights of lipstick and western pop, *also* think she is prim and earnest. There are many moments in the novel which stick in my mind. There is one rather charming episode when Marjane is interviewed before being admitted to university to check out her ideological purity. She answers with unwise candour, confessing that (although she certainly believes in God) her religious views and practices are unconventional. It seems certain that she'll be turned away but it is then revealed that the Imam (even though he is pretty orthodox himself) was impressed by her honesty.
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