Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars13
4.1 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
6
3 star
3
2 star
0
1 star
0
Format: Audio CD|Change
Price:£31.39+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 7 August 2013
This is the story of one of the most famous characters in the history of psychology. Henry Molaison lost his memory in 1953 when he had radical surgery to help cure his serious epilepsy. His epilepsy was alleviated to a degree but more dramatically he lost his long term memory and could only remember things for a few minutes.

Pick up any psychology book on memory and you'll come across HM who contributed an enormous amount to the study of memory but his true identity wasn't revealed until his death in 2008. Henry participated in thousands of studies without ever remembering for himself what he did or the people he worked with. The author Suzanne Corkin is a neuroscientist who worked with him for nearly fifty years and yet each time they met it was as if it was the first time for Henry. This absorbing book brings HM to life as a person as well as exploring the nature and science of memory itself.

It's a fascinating insight into how memory works; what Henry can't remember but also what he could remember and learn, even with such a severe impairment. It's a slightly `geeky' book for anyone interested in the neuroscience or study of memory as there is a lot of information about the tests and procedures that Henry took part in but it's well written and moves easily between the technical and personal details.

Radio 4 serialised it recently and I suspect they took out much of the technical detail and focused on the human side, but that would leave only half a book. It's interesting to get an insight into how the science of psychology has changed and developed; tests that were impossible back in the early 60s suddenly become possible as Henry gets older and new information is constantly revealed. Henry was even able to shed light on what happens in our aging brains.

If you've ever come across HM, got any interest in how pyschological studies are done or how memory works then this is definitely worth a read and thank you so much to Tina who bought it for me.
0Comment|4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 July 2013
Surprisingly, a bit of a page turner. A man has an operation on his brain. The result is that his memory disappears. Not amnesia but memory. He cannot remember what happened 30 seconds ago. Though some things he can remember - how to walk, how to read (unlike some stroke victims who cannot even be re-taught how to read and write). I once had the upsetting job of pretending to a colleague with a brain tumour that he was still working - he would ask a question, I would reply whereupon he would ask me the same question. How did he "remember" the need to ask the question but not that he had the answer? How do some birds (with a brain the size of your thumb) apparently remember the location of last year's nest after flying thosands of miles? An unusual if thought-provoking book - what if this were me?
11 comment|7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 31 August 2013
Fascinating book which, using HM's story reveals so much about how we convert short term memory into long term memory.
Psychology students, and Medics will find the detail intriguing.

However the undercurrent that i found most interesting was the narrative regarding Henry Molaison's life. His absolute trust in the medical fraternity, much misplaced. The questionable ethic of experimental neurosurgeons in the mid 20th century is frightening.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 19 September 2013
Superb and touching, the problems faced by this man suffering from an operation that did not go as planned were immense, yet he remained cheerful for most of his life.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 November 2013
Fascinating historical account of the pivotal case in the neuroscience of memory. Although prose is a bit awkward, the human story is profoundly moving.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 November 2014
For anyone interested in cognitive neuroscience/psychology etc, this book is for you. A wonderful and emotional insight into the most famous man of memory research from the expert who worked with him. A definite must read.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 27 August 2013
I found the book fascinating. This is a reference in the study of memory.
The writing is simple and accessible to anybody else.
Definitely one of the best in the field.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 October 2013
..not to be read in one sitting but I am finding it very interesting and very relevant to my studies and professional life.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 21 August 2013
This book is easy to read and follow while at the same time introducing technical concepts that a layman can understand
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 17 June 2013
Corkin's book is a must-read for every cognitive neuroscience researcher. It is indeed great history of episodic memory and helps understand autobiographic memories.
0Comment|4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse