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  • Perfume: The Story Of A Murderer (region B blu ray)
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Perfume: The Story Of A Murderer (region B blu ray)

153 customer reviews

Price: £9.98 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
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Perfume: The Story Of A Murderer (region B blu ray) + The Illusionist [Blu-ray] + Inception [Blu-ray] [2010] [Region Free]
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Product details

  • Format: Import
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Dutch
  • Region: Region B/2 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Studio: E1 Entertainment
  • Run Time: 142 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (153 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004UDXJU6
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 46,442 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Region A B C dutch import. 1080P

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By S. Mason on 11 May 2007
Format: DVD
When I heard that perfume was finally being made in to a movie, I almost fell off my chair! I knew that Suskind had been unwilling to give up the rights for the making of a film so it was with baited breath that I waited to finally see the movie. I was so pleased that it had kept close to the book and that it had been filmed so well against the beautiful scenery of southern France. The quality of the acting is superb especially that of the lead played by Ben Whishaw who plays Jean-Baptiste Grunuis capturing the haunted obsession of a young man who suffers through his tremendous sense of smell and lack of personal odour while he searches for the perfect perfume. Perfume is not a story, which should be read or watched on a passing fancy, it is dark and strange and weaves a fairly simple story in to often-great complexity. If you don't get it, read the book or watch the movie again. It's well worth taking the time with both and ultimately the film is a rare find in that it accurately captures the heart and sole of Suskind's original work.
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66 of 70 people found the following review helpful By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 21 Feb. 2007
Format: DVD
How exactly do you make a movie about smells? After all, a movie is all about sight and sound. Touch, taste and smell rarely come into it.

But acclaimed German director Tom Tykwer manages to make us smell things, in his most disturbing movie to date, "Perfume: The Story of a Murderer." This time around, the talented Tykwer abandons his usual lovers-against-the-world stories for a lushly-filmed, darkly comic story of olfactory obsession. Yes, that is what I said.

Jean-Baptiste Grenouillle (Ben Whishaw) is a man with a brilliant sense of smell, and zero body odor. He was born in a putrid fishmarket, raised in an orphanage, and later escapes from a tannery where he was working. He's enraptured by the many thrilling smells in the city -- he even kills a young girl, so that he can smell her lovely scent.

In his search for the perfect scent, Jean-Baptiste gets a job with a once-famed perfume-maker (Dustin Hoffman). But after learning that not everything has a scent, he begins killing women to try to distill their scents into the ultimate perfume -- with beautiful redhead Laura (Rachel Hurd-Wood) as the "thirteenth scent." But his ultimate scent has an even more sinister side, as his scents begin to affect the population in unusual ways.

"Perfume" is Tykwer's most unique movie to date, and the one that definitely identifies him as a cinematic master. There are lots of music that are evocative, sensual, colourfully beautiful, or unspeakably creepy, but not many manage to be all of them. "Perfume: The Story of a Murderer" is all of those, and more.

Obviously a movie doesn't smell like anything, except maybe stale popcorn. So Tykwer uses sight for smell -- rotted fish, maggots, moldy walls from the late 1700s to show Jean-Baptiste's miserable origins.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By S. Haddow VINE VOICE on 12 Jun. 2007
Format: DVD
Although it always sounds snobbish to say 'I read the book and it's much better', unfortunately that's true here (it wasn't an international best seller for nothing..) In fact, it's somehow hard to pinpoint the reason why the book is better, but I suppose the slightly supernatural element in the book feels like a metaphor (I'm thinking of the fates of Grenouille's employers) where on the screen it feels slightly out of place and makes it hard to view the story as either a metaphorical journey or the plot driven story of a serial killer. The book juggles this juxtaposition better. This also feels true of many of the key moments in the story, and although the inner life of Grenouille's obsession with smell is well captured, some sense of his monstrous nature is missing and I felt urged to sympathise with him too often. The book never engages you to sympathise - just observe. All the same, it's interesting to see this on the screen, and the film has a lot of positive elements, most notably the sense of time and place, and the cast in general. The film sticks closely to the plot but both in terms of the secondary characters in the novel adding depth to the vignettes, and in an understanding of Grenouille himself, the film ultimately feels contracted and a little flat. In fact you would probably just think - decent enough film but I wonder what all the fuss was about?
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Tim Coleman VINE VOICE on 10 Jan. 2009
Format: DVD
As someone who is not a fan of period dramas, nor always of book adaptations (as they rarely seem to surpass their source material), I approached Perfume with a degree of trepidation. However, as the credits rolled, I felt that I was still digesting the content of the film before me, with all it's sublime, sumptuous, and frequently disturbing substance.

The plot might scan like a variation on the clichéd serial killer motif: social outcast Grenouille (Winshaw) stalks women to murder them and then, using the methods normally reserved for capturing the scents from flowers, he distills their beautiful odours down to oils which he intends to mix together into the eponymous "Perfume". So far, so quasi-cannibalistic. However, the film excels on a number of levels.

Firstly, the imagery is choice. Director Tom Tykwer literally stuffs the screen full of arresting shots from the sublimely beautiful (blossoms on the wind, moist fruit, wisps of hair) to the gut-turning awful (the opening scene of our antagonists birth in the filthy fish market stands out in mind as one of the most movingly disgusting movie moments in memory). The effect is to create a kind of surrogate sense of smell, where one feels that the feast for the sense on screen is almost being experienced.

Secondly, Bren Winshaw is first rate as central character Grenouille, turning in a performance that at first extracts pity, then horror, anger, fascination, and then finally pity again. It is a multi-layered performance, and one that could well reveal more on repeat viewings.

Finally, the story itself, one of magic realism, primal longing for beauty, and hollow self-loathing resonates deeply as a kind of tragic parable.
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