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Pepe Le Moko [DVD]

20 customer reviews

Price: £9.50 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
20 new from £9.02 6 used from £6.78 2 collectible from £12.99

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Rent Pepe Le Moko on DVD from LOVEFiLM By Post
£9.50 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Product details

  • Actors: Jean Gabin, Mireille Ballin, Gabriel Gabrio
  • Directors: Julien Duvivier
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: Studiocanal
  • DVD Release Date: 2 Aug. 2004
  • Run Time: 92 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0002HSDSW
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 61,521 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

The story of a Jewel thief, Pepe le Moko, who lives as a gang leader in the Allgerian Casbah. He is protected from justice so long as he stays in the country. Unfortunately he falls for a young Parisienne and risks his freedom to be with her.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By C. O. DeRiemer HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on 23 July 2007
Format: DVD
"Le Moko? A prince of plunder," says Inspector Slimane. "Fifteen convictions, 33 daylight robberies, two bank holdups. And burglaries? We haven't enough fingers in this room on which to count them all. How could he not be admired? And such a good boy! He wears his heart on his sleeve. As quick with a smile for his friends as a knife for foes. So charming."

Pepe le Moko (Jean Gabin) fled France for Algiers after a robbery, and has been holed up in the Casbah for two years. He's a major crime figure and the police, as long as he stays in the Casbah's labyrinth of streets, stairways and alleys, protected and warned by the people who live there, can't touch him. But le Moko is tired of his fate. He longs for France and freedom. He's bored with his life and with his mistress (Line Noro). The Casbah has become a prison. He knows Inspector Slimane (Lucas Gridoux), for whom he has a degree of liking, is patiently waiting for the opportunity to trap him. Then one night, escaping from a botched police raid, he encounters Gaby (Mireille Balin), a slumming socialite whose bills are being paid by a wealthy older man. She, at first, is intrigued by his reputation and then is captured by his charm and confidence. Le Moko is captured, too, by her beauty, her freshness and by the overwhelming lure of freedom she represents. In the background, observing and then manipulating, is Inspector Slimane. When we first meet him, Slimane seems a little too obsequious to his superiors and a little too outclassed by le Moko. In fact, he proves smarter and more ruthless than anyone else. The ending is a heartbreaker.

Jean Gabin gives a performance of such understated power that you can't keep your eyes off him. What's le Moko like, asks one character. Charming and frightening is the reply.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Budge Burgess on 25 April 2005
Format: DVD
Jean Gabin, an icon of French cinema, plays Pépé le Moko, a Parisian gangster who has taken refuge in Algiers' Kasbah - a maze of narrow streets and hideaways in which the police have no hope of catching him. He is a notorious local celebrity, admired by the criminal fraternity, adored by women, but troubled. He knows he is already a prisoner - he may be at liberty in the Kasbah, but he is trapped, and longs to see Paris again, longs for the freedom of the open sea. Take one step outside the Kasbah, and the police will have him.
Into his life drifts the beautiful Gaby, a woman who has latched on to a sugar daddy who provides her with diamonds, an exotic lifestyle, and enough freedom to be able to take a walk on the wild side and explore the Kasbah. There she meets Pépé. And the police realise that she might just be the bait to lure him out into the town.
Julien Duvivier's 1937 film was hastily remade in the USA as "Algiers". Its theme of doomed romance would be echoed in "Casablanca". The tense black and white photography would help stimulate the emergence of noir cinema in the USA. It's exploration of the Kasbah will be influential on films like "The Battle of Algiers". And the cynical romanticism of its hero is even at the root of the Pépé le Pew cartoons!
"Pépé le Moko" takes the suave Gabin and creates an anti-hero of epic proportions.
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41 of 43 people found the following review helpful By "howellzuk" on 26 April 2005
Format: DVD
One of the defining moments in thirties French cinema(perhaps the greatest era in motion picture history), Pepe le Moko c'est la masterpiece. It is the work of a proficient director united with imperious French acting legend, Jean Gabin(La grande Illusion, La Bete Humaine) successfully creating a thriller that functions consumately on a poetic level. Usually filmmakers with thrillers in their oeuvre are typically devoid of any poetic intuition in their movies but Duvivier elevates this film to a transcendent plateau rarely frequented by other films in the genre.
The texture of the cinematography has a warmth and richness of visual expression, enhanced with the vernacular architecture of the Casbah, a labyrinth of obscurely named streets which glow with lucidity. Duvivier perfectly articulates the expression of doomed love, and Gabin's aesthetic charm, posture and countenance portray beautifully the gangster le Moko. Put simply this film is cast iron, avant garde masterwork of French cinema.
Word on the DVD. For a 1936 film, it is restored beautifully. Conversely, the waterfall home entertainment release of this film is an abomination, an odious mess that is sheer insolence and impudence in the face of the customer. BUY THIS RELEASE!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Budge Burgess on 25 April 2005
Format: DVD
Jean Gabin, an icon of French cinema, plays Pépé le Moko, a Parisian gangster who has taken refuge in Algiers' Kasbah - a maze of narrow streets and hideaways in which the police have no hope of catching him. He is a notorious local celebrity, admired by the criminal fraternity, adored by women, but troubled. He knows he is already a prisoner - he may be at liberty in the Kasbah, but he is trapped, and longs to see Paris again, longs for the freedom of the open sea. Take one step outside the Kasbah, and the police will have him.
Into his life drifts the beautiful Gaby, a woman who has latched on to a sugar daddy who provides her with diamonds, an exotic lifestyle, and enough freedom to be able to take a walk on the wild side and explore the Kasbah. There she meets Pépé. And the police realise that she might just be the bait to lure him out into the town.
Julien Duvivier's 1937 film was hastily remade in the USA as "Algiers". Its theme of doomed romance would be echoed in "Casablanca". The tense black and white photography would help stimulate the emergence of noir cinema in the USA. It's exploration of the Kasbah will be influential on films like "The Battle of Algiers". And the cynical romanticism of its hero is even at the root of the Pépé le Pew cartoons!
"Pépé le Moko" takes the suave Gabin and creates an anti-hero of epic proportions.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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