Buy Used
Used - Very Good See details
Price: 1.96

or
 
   
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Penguin Dictionary of Physics (Penguin Reference Books) [Paperback]

Valerie Illingworth
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Amazon.co.uk Trade-In Store
Did you know you can use your mobile to trade in your unwanted books for an Amazon.co.uk Gift Card to spend on the things you want? Visit the Books Trade-In Store for more details or check out the Trade-In Amazon Mobile App Guidelines on how to trade in using a smartphone. Learn more.

Book Description

5 Aug 2004 Penguin Reference Books
The Penguin Dictionary of Physics provides clear and concise definitions for every area of physics - from optics and acoustics to mechanics and electronics, via quantum theory and relativity. The ideal reference guide to this fast-evolving subject, it will prove invaluable to students and teachers, scientists and doctors, as well as technicians and technologists.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin; 3Rev Ed edition (5 Aug 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140514597
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140514599
  • Product Dimensions: 17.7 x 15.4 x 2.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 843,976 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

This is a really useful reference book for anyone who wants to follow developments in our understanding of the universe. -- Stephen Hawking

From the Publisher

Some sample entries:

MOMENTUM

1 Syn. linear momentum. Of a particle. Symbol: p. The product of the mass and the velocity of the particle. It is a VECTOR quantity directed through the particle in the direction of motion. The linear momentum of a body or of a system of particles is the vector sum of the linear momenta of the individual particles. If a body of mass M is translated (see TRANSLATION) with velocity V, its momentum is MV, which is the momentum of a particle of mass M at the centre of gravity of the body.
2 See ANGULAR MOMENTUM

RICHTER SCALE

A scale for measuring the strength of earthquakes (see SEISMOLOGY), devised in 1935. The logarithmic scale ranges from 0 to 10 and is based on the logarithm of the amplitude of the ground movement divided by the period of the dominant wave, subject to certain corrections, including distance and the seismic characteristics of the area. On the Richter scale a value of 2 indicates a minor tremor, while values between 7 and 9 cause a major earthquake with extensive damage to buildings in urban areas. The strongest earthquake recorded had a value on the Richter scale of 8.9.

BECKMANN THERMOMETER

A mercury-in-glass thermometer used for the accurate determination of small temperature changes. The lower bulb is much larger than that of an ordinary thermometer and the scale behind the capillary tube, which is about 30cm long, is divided into hundredths of a degree and covers only about 5-6 ºC. The temperature change to be measured can take place about any mean temperature in the range, say, 0 ºC to 100 ºC, by varying the amount of mercury present in the lower bulb. This is made possible by running in more mercury from the small reservoir bulb at the top of the capillary, or conversely by running some mercury from the lower bulb into the reservoir where it plays no further part in the production of the thermometer reading. The variable amount of mercury present in the bulb means that the scale graduations will only exactly represent true degrees Celsius at the setting for which the scale has been calibrated.


Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.5 out of 5 stars
4.5 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Useful reference 20 Jun 2001
It is tempting to compare this dictionary with the Dictionary of Physics (Oxford Paperback Reference, ISBN 0-19-280013-1). They are both coming from an established British publishing house, both are paperbacks, both the same size, both updated in the same year (2000), and, curiously, they have both been prepared by Market House Books, Ltd.
Jumping to the conclusion that we are talking about variations of the same book would have been erroneous, though. A quick glance at the inside reveals the differences. Although the difference in the nominal number of terms defined is not that great (4500 for Penguin vs. 3500 - sometimes claimed even 4000 - for Oxford), the subjective feeling is that Penguin knows a lot more terms. Oxford, on the other hand, also contains short biographies of selected scientists, articles on each of the 109 chemical elements, some dozen two-page feature articles on selected topics like Big Bang, Free Electron Theory etc, and about just as many chronologies of selected areas of physics. Also, the definition of terms are on average longer in the Oxford dictionary - the definition of "orbital" is, for instance, two whole pages long, "death of a star" takes up one and a half page, etc. The illustrations in Penguin vastly outnumber those in Oxford, but I found those latter more informative. Both delve into technology as well, especially semiconductor technology, and, for my opinion, spend (or waste) too much space on computer science technology. Do we really need CPU, RAM, CD-ROM, DAT etc. defined in a Physics dictionary?
Which one is more useful? As a non-native speaker, it is likely that I use it differently than a native speaker would, so your mileage may vary. I've been educated in physics in my native language, and I think in it when I think physics.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What it says on the cover 19 Dec 2009
I'm a physics undergraduate and bought this book so that i would have something to reference for most pieces of work.
This book has been useful in this regard and many more. It provides very short and precise summaries of many physical theorys and has useful diagrams where appropriate. I strongly recommend this book to physics students, (it's more reliable than Wikipedia!) or anyone with in interest in physics who wants a good reference book or some general knowledge of intermediate and advanced level physics.
I cannot compare this book to any similar books, as i haven't read them and haven't needed to.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
33 of 33 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Useful reference 20 Jun 2001
By Primoz Peterlin - Published on Amazon.com
It is tempting to compare this dictionary with the Dictionary of Physics (Oxford Paperback Reference, ISBN 0-19-280013-1). They are both coming from an established British publishing house, both are paperbacks, both the same size, both updated in the same year (2000), and, curiously, they have both been prepared by Market House Books, Ltd.
Jumping to the conclusion that we are talking about variations of the same book would have been erroneous, though. A quick glance at the inside reveals the differences. Although the difference in the nominal number of terms defined is not that great (4500 for Penguin vs. 3500 - sometimes claimed even 4000 - for Oxford), the subjective feeling is that Penguin knows a lot more terms. Oxford, on the other hand, also contains short biographies of selected scientists, articles on each of the 109 chemical elements, some dozen two-page feature articles on selected topics like Big Bang, Free Electron Theory etc, and about just as many chronologies of selected areas of physics. Also, the definition of terms are on average longer in the Oxford dictionary - the definition of "orbital" is, for instance, two whole pages long, "death of a star" takes up one and a half page, etc. The illustrations in Penguin vastly outnumber those in Oxford, but I found those latter more informative. Both delve into technology as well, especially semiconductor technology, and, for my opinion, spend (or waste) too much space on computer science technology. Do we really need CPU, RAM, CD-ROM, DAT etc. defined in a Physics dictionary?
Which one is more useful? As a non-native speaker, it is likely that I use it differently than a native speaker would, so your mileage may vary. I've been educated in physics in my native language, and I think in it when I think physics. When I have to write in English, I occasionally encounter a term which I am not quite sure whether I know the correct English expression, although it is lurking somewhere in the back of my head. So it's a time to check it in the dictionary. It is likely that I will already find it in Penguin, and not find it in Oxford. In the latter case, I have to look for a broader term to find it. Searching through Oxford is therefore somewhat more time-consuming. However, the process is reversed when I don't already know in advance the term I want to check, but I do know the broader term, then Oxford comes in more handy. So, in a way, I find the two dictionaries complementary.
Was this review helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews
ARRAY(0xabf2b3cc)

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback