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Pegasus Bridge: 6 June 1944 Paperback – 7 Feb 1994


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Paperback, 7 Feb 1994
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Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket Books; New edition edition (7 Feb. 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671712616
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671712617
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,333,918 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Dr. Stephen Ambrose was a renowned historian and acclaimed author of more than 30 books. Among his New York Times best-sellers are: Nothing Like It in the World, Citizen Soldiers, Band of Brothers, D-Day - June 6, 1944, and Undaunted Courage.He was not only a great author, but also a captivating speaker, with the unique ability to provide insight into the future by employing his profound knowledge of the past. His stories demonstrate how leaders use trust, friendship and shared experiences to work together and thrive during conflict and change. His philosophy about keeping an audience engaged is put best in his own words: "As I sit at my computer, or stand at the podium, I think of myself as sitting around the campfire after a day on the trail, telling stories that I hope will have the members of the audience, or the readers, leaning forward just a bit, wanting to know what happens next." Dr. Ambrose was a retired Boyd Professor of History at the University of New Orleans. He was the Director Emeritus of the Eisenhower Center in New Orleans, and the founder of the National D-Day Museum. He was also a contributing editor for the Quarterly Journal of Military History, a member of the board of directors for American Rivers, and a member of the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Council Board. His talents have not gone unnoticed by the film industry. Dr. Ambrose was the historical consultant for Steven Spielberg's movie Saving Private Ryan. Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks purchased the film rights to his books Citizen Soldiers and Band of Brothers to make the 13-hour HBO mini-series Band of Brothers. He has also participated in numerous national television programs, including ones for the History Channel and National Geographic.

Product Description

Review

Noland Norgaard The Denver Post The best war story this reviewer has ever read. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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It was a steel-girder bridge, painted gray, with a large water tower and superstructure. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By M D Thompson on 2 July 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ambrose's technique is to focus on the words and experiences of the participants, not the offical history. For those who found Band of Brothers too 'American' then this is the perfect antidote as he uses similar techniques to examine one of the most daring exploits of the second world war carried out by British glider pilots and soldiers.
It is popular history at its best, making the reader feel a part of the action whilst still providing more than enough social, political and military context to make it more than just an adventure story. All of the main participants are unconvential in many ways, sharing a passion both to do their duty and, most of all, not to let their comrades down. It is this aspect of military history that Ambrose does so well, understanding what makes soldiers in modern warfare face up to unimaginable danger. I am of that generation that owes it all to our parents generation who sacrificed so much. This book offers real insights into the bravery of one particular group of men that demosntrated the best atteibutes of that generation - they did it because it had to be done and they were determined to do it well and, interestinghly, have a great time doing it, despite the pain and the loss. These were men who were unconvential and didn't really care what anybody else thought about them, except their comrades. They wanted to be good at what they did, they were good at what they did and their achievement was truly astonishing.
A stirring tale.
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33 of 37 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 6 Aug. 1999
Format: Paperback
Ambrose furthers his study of D Day operations with this detailed and well researched volume. He has an obvious regard for those who took part in this high intensity operation and makes a strong representation of the the unit story and the individuals that took part. This is really a story of leadership, daring and success in the face of difficult conditions. Major John Howard and his team performed superbly and this is their story. The book does justice to both the people and their actions. A truly enjoyable and informative read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By KBL on 24 Mar. 2010
Format: Paperback
Of all the books i have read about the Pegasus Bridge coup de main, this book is very low down on my list of good accounts. It just doesn't read right to me. It's hard to describe but it reads like an over the top adventure, not a important, dangerous and valiant episode of British Military action, the first completed action of the Normandy landings by the allies.
Of all the Military history writers around, the late Mr Ambrose in my honest opinion does not rate very high. A better account of this action in my opinion is the book by Denis Edwards called 'The Devils own luck' this recounts his personal experience of the Pegasus bridge landing up to the Balkans. There is also the personal account by Major John Howard 'Pegasus Diaries', no one mentions either of these books in their lists of Military books to read, but mention this book by Mr Ambrose, that is sad. If you want to read what really happened read an account by a person who was actually there.
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Format: Paperback
First let me start off by saying I loved Band of Brothers Us Tie in: E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne : from Normandy to Hitler's Eagle's Nest, also by Ambrose. I liked how Pegasus Bridge starts out and was getting the feeling this would be another great book. However, I found Ambrose's telling of the battle for Pegasus Bridge quite anticlimactic. The fight to take the bridge is over before it begins. Ambrose talks about fighting occurring frequently in defense of the bridge, but rarely provides details. More often than not the anecdotes provide more comic relief than a compelling story. The exception is Sergeant Thornton taking out the tank to halt an early German counterattack. Soon after this Company D goes into reserve while the 7th Battalion takes over the defense. Even when some of Company D troops go into the front no details are provided. I was expecting a lot more detail from a book that is purported to be about a single two day battle. The impression that I get from reading Ambrose's account is that taking the bridge was easy and, other than the one perfect shot by Sergeant Thornton, Company D is relieved by the 7th Battalion before all the real fighting gets started.

After Company D leaves the bridge to rejoin its regiment, the story goes downhill. This part of the story seems detached and aimless. I think Ambrose would have been better served concentrating more on the fight at the bridges and enlarging his scope to provide more coverage of the 7th Battalion defense against the counterattacks. The Battle for Pegasus Bridge shouldn't be just a story of Company D. Ambrose really relies on too few sources to make the story complete.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Richard Miles on 1 Mar. 2006
Format: Paperback
This book, explaining the involvement of the Ox and Bucks Light Infantry and the training and execution of their mission to capture Pegasus Bridge is excellent.
There are many first-hand accounts from those who took part, including Major Howard, the officer who planned much of the mission once it had been assigned to him. The landing, capture and retention of the bridge is described in great detail and plays out hour by hour, giving the reader the sense of almost being there!
Another excellent book by Stephen E Ambrose
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