Paul Weller

Top Albums by Paul Weller (See all 129 albums)


See all 129 albums by Paul Weller

All downloads by Paul Weller
Sort by:
Bestselling
1-10 of 890
Song Title Album  

Videos


Image of Paul Weller
Provided by the artist or their representative

Latest Tweet

paulwellerHQ

The excellent @telegramband support Weller Audley End on Jul 26: http://t.co/8cY4haFJpP Not heard them? Listen here: http://t.co/0Wkt1Tax68


At a Glance

Birthname: John William Weller
Nationality: British
Born: May 25 1958


Biography

Modern Classics; the title said it all, really. A little tongue in cheek, perhaps, but he had a point. In just eight years as a solo artist, Paul Weller had created a body of work that not only matched the very best of his previous groups’ output, but also put him toe to toe – and frequently head and shoulders above – the crop of new bands claiming him as a hero. He’d made some of the finest records of the 1990s and was playing to the biggest crowds of his career, many of whom weren’t even born by the time The Jam split up. For most artists, it would be a good opportunity to take a little ... Read more

Modern Classics; the title said it all, really. A little tongue in cheek, perhaps, but he had a point. In just eight years as a solo artist, Paul Weller had created a body of work that not only matched the very best of his previous groups’ output, but also put him toe to toe – and frequently head and shoulders above – the crop of new bands claiming him as a hero. He’d made some of the finest records of the 1990s and was playing to the biggest crowds of his career, many of whom weren’t even born by the time The Jam split up. For most artists, it would be a good opportunity to take a little victory lap.

“I don’t know if I think like that, really,” ponders Weller, tugging on a ciggie at his Woking studio-cum-unofficial HQ. “I don’t know if any of it’s particularly a full stop, it’s just another record in the line for me.”

And that, in a way, is why you’re currently looking at More Modern Classics. No matter how many timeless records are under his belt, Paul Weller is always looking ahead to the next thing, trying something different, inspired by the thrill of the new. A modernist in the true sense of the word, for him, laurels are something you might have on the breast of your polo shirt, they’re not for resting on.

“I’d hate to get to a stage where I think, Oh I wish I could get back to what I was dong in 1996 or whatever,” he thinks. “I always prefer the new stuff. You make a record and you make it in good faith and then after that it’s gone and you’re on to the next thing. Sitting around re-mastering All Mod Cons? Fuck that, mate.”

As such, the last 15 years have seen Weller doggedly follow his own artistic path along its many twists and turns, continually adopting, adapting and evolving to stay one step ahead of the pack. From the warm, rustic sounds of Sweet Pea, My Sweet Pea and He’s The Keeper (written after Small Faces/Faces keyboardist Kenny Jones phoned Weller to break the news of the passing of his beloved Ronnie Lane), to the crackling, horn sample-led shuffle of It’s Written In The Stars and the artistic re-charge of his first covers album Studio 150 (represented here by a sumptuous re-invention of Rose Royce’s Wishing On A Star) to the lean adrenalin rush of From The Floorboards Up and Come On, Let’s Go. These songs are the sound of a songwriter and a band at the peak of their powers, masters of their craft with an almost telepathic understanding of what can make a great tune even greater.

2006 saw him add to seemingly never-ending stash of awards and plaudits with an Outstanding Contribution To Music Brit Award, tearing through a blistering selection of classics old and new on the night as a crowd that included Kanye West, Prince, Coldplay and Damon Albarn’s Gorillaz looked on and applauded.
For Weller though, once again it was time to tear it up and start afresh, break up the band and find a whole new approach to making music.

“I thought with that sound and that line up we’d taken it as far as it could go,” he remembers. “It was a creative decision. Sometimes you just have to move on to find something else in life.” Sound familiar?

The resulting album marked one of the most remarkable creative re-births of recent years. 2008’s 22 Dreams was a dazzling kaleidoscope of unexpected shifts, and head-spinning sonic inventiveness all marked by a wide-eyed sense of newfound artistic freedom. From the intoxicating feedback swirls of Noel Gallagher co-write Echoes Round The Sun to Push It Along’s mindboggling rubik cube, it bowled over both fans and those who had long since written off Weller as merely a dependable traditionalist.

“I learnt a lot on that record. It was the first time that I’d not had any set ideas but went in and made up shit and see what happened,” he recalls of 22 Dreams’ anything-goes approach. “It’s another string to your bow, to constantly try to come up with different ways of forming a song. It gets more difficult the longer you’re doing it, but it’s just being open to possibilities. It taught me that you’ve got to keep adapting, you’ve got to keep changing otherwise you end up being a parody of yourself.”

The creative fire sparked by this new way of creating music spread onto his next two albums. 2010’s spiky and restlessly experimental Wake Up The Nation was written in response to what Weller viewed as the play it safe attitude of the then music scene.

“I was trying to make music that I wasn’t hearing,” he recalls. “I thought people needed to get back out there again, back onto the streets, back out in the clubs, back out making music. It only feels weird for me to be saying that being 50 whatever I was at the time. It’s the sort of thing an 18-year-old should be saying really, but we live in a very different time.”

The album was justly nominated for that year’s Mercury Music Prize, Weller’s electrifying call to arms going up alongside the very best new acts including Foals, Laura Marling and The XX. Alongside 22 Dreams and 2012’s dazzling Sonik Kicks, in which he crams about as many ideas and sounds into futuristic three and a bit minute pop songs as humanly possible, it’s rightly regarded as among the best records he’s ever produced. Not bad for someone approaching 40 years in the music business. Indeed, try to think of another artist who first raised their head as part of the punk class of ’77 that’s still out there, making the some of the greatest music of their career and putting acts half their age to shame?

Nor does this extended purple patch show any sign of abating, either. The narky, glam growl of last year’s Flame Out and Weimar cabaret lurch of Brand New Toy (released in the UK as part of Record Store Day and included here) offer a fascinating insight into an artist for whom all bets are currently off.

“Whether it’s a pointer to where I’m going next I haven’t got a clue,” he states matter-of-factly about his latest recording. “I don’t feel any constraints at all musically anymore. I’m totally, totally open-minded. I don’t know where it’s going to go and I’m quite happy with that.”

See you in another 15 years then.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Modern Classics; the title said it all, really. A little tongue in cheek, perhaps, but he had a point. In just eight years as a solo artist, Paul Weller had created a body of work that not only matched the very best of his previous groups’ output, but also put him toe to toe – and frequently head and shoulders above – the crop of new bands claiming him as a hero. He’d made some of the finest records of the 1990s and was playing to the biggest crowds of his career, many of whom weren’t even born by the time The Jam split up. For most artists, it would be a good opportunity to take a little victory lap.

“I don’t know if I think like that, really,” ponders Weller, tugging on a ciggie at his Woking studio-cum-unofficial HQ. “I don’t know if any of it’s particularly a full stop, it’s just another record in the line for me.”

And that, in a way, is why you’re currently looking at More Modern Classics. No matter how many timeless records are under his belt, Paul Weller is always looking ahead to the next thing, trying something different, inspired by the thrill of the new. A modernist in the true sense of the word, for him, laurels are something you might have on the breast of your polo shirt, they’re not for resting on.

“I’d hate to get to a stage where I think, Oh I wish I could get back to what I was dong in 1996 or whatever,” he thinks. “I always prefer the new stuff. You make a record and you make it in good faith and then after that it’s gone and you’re on to the next thing. Sitting around re-mastering All Mod Cons? Fuck that, mate.”

As such, the last 15 years have seen Weller doggedly follow his own artistic path along its many twists and turns, continually adopting, adapting and evolving to stay one step ahead of the pack. From the warm, rustic sounds of Sweet Pea, My Sweet Pea and He’s The Keeper (written after Small Faces/Faces keyboardist Kenny Jones phoned Weller to break the news of the passing of his beloved Ronnie Lane), to the crackling, horn sample-led shuffle of It’s Written In The Stars and the artistic re-charge of his first covers album Studio 150 (represented here by a sumptuous re-invention of Rose Royce’s Wishing On A Star) to the lean adrenalin rush of From The Floorboards Up and Come On, Let’s Go. These songs are the sound of a songwriter and a band at the peak of their powers, masters of their craft with an almost telepathic understanding of what can make a great tune even greater.

2006 saw him add to seemingly never-ending stash of awards and plaudits with an Outstanding Contribution To Music Brit Award, tearing through a blistering selection of classics old and new on the night as a crowd that included Kanye West, Prince, Coldplay and Damon Albarn’s Gorillaz looked on and applauded.
For Weller though, once again it was time to tear it up and start afresh, break up the band and find a whole new approach to making music.

“I thought with that sound and that line up we’d taken it as far as it could go,” he remembers. “It was a creative decision. Sometimes you just have to move on to find something else in life.” Sound familiar?

The resulting album marked one of the most remarkable creative re-births of recent years. 2008’s 22 Dreams was a dazzling kaleidoscope of unexpected shifts, and head-spinning sonic inventiveness all marked by a wide-eyed sense of newfound artistic freedom. From the intoxicating feedback swirls of Noel Gallagher co-write Echoes Round The Sun to Push It Along’s mindboggling rubik cube, it bowled over both fans and those who had long since written off Weller as merely a dependable traditionalist.

“I learnt a lot on that record. It was the first time that I’d not had any set ideas but went in and made up shit and see what happened,” he recalls of 22 Dreams’ anything-goes approach. “It’s another string to your bow, to constantly try to come up with different ways of forming a song. It gets more difficult the longer you’re doing it, but it’s just being open to possibilities. It taught me that you’ve got to keep adapting, you’ve got to keep changing otherwise you end up being a parody of yourself.”

The creative fire sparked by this new way of creating music spread onto his next two albums. 2010’s spiky and restlessly experimental Wake Up The Nation was written in response to what Weller viewed as the play it safe attitude of the then music scene.

“I was trying to make music that I wasn’t hearing,” he recalls. “I thought people needed to get back out there again, back onto the streets, back out in the clubs, back out making music. It only feels weird for me to be saying that being 50 whatever I was at the time. It’s the sort of thing an 18-year-old should be saying really, but we live in a very different time.”

The album was justly nominated for that year’s Mercury Music Prize, Weller’s electrifying call to arms going up alongside the very best new acts including Foals, Laura Marling and The XX. Alongside 22 Dreams and 2012’s dazzling Sonik Kicks, in which he crams about as many ideas and sounds into futuristic three and a bit minute pop songs as humanly possible, it’s rightly regarded as among the best records he’s ever produced. Not bad for someone approaching 40 years in the music business. Indeed, try to think of another artist who first raised their head as part of the punk class of ’77 that’s still out there, making the some of the greatest music of their career and putting acts half their age to shame?

Nor does this extended purple patch show any sign of abating, either. The narky, glam growl of last year’s Flame Out and Weimar cabaret lurch of Brand New Toy (released in the UK as part of Record Store Day and included here) offer a fascinating insight into an artist for whom all bets are currently off.

“Whether it’s a pointer to where I’m going next I haven’t got a clue,” he states matter-of-factly about his latest recording. “I don’t feel any constraints at all musically anymore. I’m totally, totally open-minded. I don’t know where it’s going to go and I’m quite happy with that.”

See you in another 15 years then.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Modern Classics; the title said it all, really. A little tongue in cheek, perhaps, but he had a point. In just eight years as a solo artist, Paul Weller had created a body of work that not only matched the very best of his previous groups’ output, but also put him toe to toe – and frequently head and shoulders above – the crop of new bands claiming him as a hero. He’d made some of the finest records of the 1990s and was playing to the biggest crowds of his career, many of whom weren’t even born by the time The Jam split up. For most artists, it would be a good opportunity to take a little victory lap.

“I don’t know if I think like that, really,” ponders Weller, tugging on a ciggie at his Woking studio-cum-unofficial HQ. “I don’t know if any of it’s particularly a full stop, it’s just another record in the line for me.”

And that, in a way, is why you’re currently looking at More Modern Classics. No matter how many timeless records are under his belt, Paul Weller is always looking ahead to the next thing, trying something different, inspired by the thrill of the new. A modernist in the true sense of the word, for him, laurels are something you might have on the breast of your polo shirt, they’re not for resting on.

“I’d hate to get to a stage where I think, Oh I wish I could get back to what I was dong in 1996 or whatever,” he thinks. “I always prefer the new stuff. You make a record and you make it in good faith and then after that it’s gone and you’re on to the next thing. Sitting around re-mastering All Mod Cons? Fuck that, mate.”

As such, the last 15 years have seen Weller doggedly follow his own artistic path along its many twists and turns, continually adopting, adapting and evolving to stay one step ahead of the pack. From the warm, rustic sounds of Sweet Pea, My Sweet Pea and He’s The Keeper (written after Small Faces/Faces keyboardist Kenny Jones phoned Weller to break the news of the passing of his beloved Ronnie Lane), to the crackling, horn sample-led shuffle of It’s Written In The Stars and the artistic re-charge of his first covers album Studio 150 (represented here by a sumptuous re-invention of Rose Royce’s Wishing On A Star) to the lean adrenalin rush of From The Floorboards Up and Come On, Let’s Go. These songs are the sound of a songwriter and a band at the peak of their powers, masters of their craft with an almost telepathic understanding of what can make a great tune even greater.

2006 saw him add to seemingly never-ending stash of awards and plaudits with an Outstanding Contribution To Music Brit Award, tearing through a blistering selection of classics old and new on the night as a crowd that included Kanye West, Prince, Coldplay and Damon Albarn’s Gorillaz looked on and applauded.
For Weller though, once again it was time to tear it up and start afresh, break up the band and find a whole new approach to making music.

“I thought with that sound and that line up we’d taken it as far as it could go,” he remembers. “It was a creative decision. Sometimes you just have to move on to find something else in life.” Sound familiar?

The resulting album marked one of the most remarkable creative re-births of recent years. 2008’s 22 Dreams was a dazzling kaleidoscope of unexpected shifts, and head-spinning sonic inventiveness all marked by a wide-eyed sense of newfound artistic freedom. From the intoxicating feedback swirls of Noel Gallagher co-write Echoes Round The Sun to Push It Along’s mindboggling rubik cube, it bowled over both fans and those who had long since written off Weller as merely a dependable traditionalist.

“I learnt a lot on that record. It was the first time that I’d not had any set ideas but went in and made up shit and see what happened,” he recalls of 22 Dreams’ anything-goes approach. “It’s another string to your bow, to constantly try to come up with different ways of forming a song. It gets more difficult the longer you’re doing it, but it’s just being open to possibilities. It taught me that you’ve got to keep adapting, you’ve got to keep changing otherwise you end up being a parody of yourself.”

The creative fire sparked by this new way of creating music spread onto his next two albums. 2010’s spiky and restlessly experimental Wake Up The Nation was written in response to what Weller viewed as the play it safe attitude of the then music scene.

“I was trying to make music that I wasn’t hearing,” he recalls. “I thought people needed to get back out there again, back onto the streets, back out in the clubs, back out making music. It only feels weird for me to be saying that being 50 whatever I was at the time. It’s the sort of thing an 18-year-old should be saying really, but we live in a very different time.”

The album was justly nominated for that year’s Mercury Music Prize, Weller’s electrifying call to arms going up alongside the very best new acts including Foals, Laura Marling and The XX. Alongside 22 Dreams and 2012’s dazzling Sonik Kicks, in which he crams about as many ideas and sounds into futuristic three and a bit minute pop songs as humanly possible, it’s rightly regarded as among the best records he’s ever produced. Not bad for someone approaching 40 years in the music business. Indeed, try to think of another artist who first raised their head as part of the punk class of ’77 that’s still out there, making the some of the greatest music of their career and putting acts half their age to shame?

Nor does this extended purple patch show any sign of abating, either. The narky, glam growl of last year’s Flame Out and Weimar cabaret lurch of Brand New Toy (released in the UK as part of Record Store Day and included here) offer a fascinating insight into an artist for whom all bets are currently off.

“Whether it’s a pointer to where I’m going next I haven’t got a clue,” he states matter-of-factly about his latest recording. “I don’t feel any constraints at all musically anymore. I’m totally, totally open-minded. I don’t know where it’s going to go and I’m quite happy with that.”

See you in another 15 years then.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Improve This Page

If you’re the artist, management or record label, you can update your biography, photos, videos and more at Artist Central.

Get started at Artist Central

Feedback

Check out our Artist Stores FAQ
Send us feedback about this page