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Patrick [Paperback]

Stephen Lawhead
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
RRP: 12.99
Price: 9.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
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Book Description

4 July 2011

Set in an era of brutal conflict and turmoil, this epic adventure is the first novel to tell the full story of the slave who became a saint, of the man who rose to the challenge of his time and changed the course of history.

In the summer of 405AD, Irish raiders attack the western coast of Wales, carving a fiery swathe through the peaceful countryside. Among the survivors who are rounded up and taken back to Ireland is Succat: an impulsive sixteen-year-old son of a powerful Roman family.

Succat is sold as a slave and put to work tending sheep. Repeated escape attempts lead to ever more brutal and savage beatings, until he comes to the attention of Cormac, a young novice druid. The two strike up an unlikely friendship and, as Succat learns the ways of the Irish people, he is given a new name by the druid: Patrick.

With a new name begins Patrick’s new life: he is married, and returns to his home to claim his inheritance, only to find his father’s estate in ruins. So begins a calamitous journey that will lead him to Tours, see him join the Roman Legion as a soldier, suffer the the horrors of a plague-filled Rome; and thence back to Ireland, where he will embark on a mission for which his name will be remembered throughout history.

In the spirit of Bernard Cornwell's Arthurian cycle, Patrick is a gritty and unsentimental portrait of one of the Western world's great icons, featuring an accurate and compelling rendering of the historical period – an era full of brutal conflict, adventure, turmoil, and visionary inspiration.


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Patrick + Hood: Number 1 in series (King Raven Trilogy) + Scarlet: Number 2 in series (King Raven Trilogy)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; New Ed edition (4 July 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007148852
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007148851
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 11.1 x 4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 169,058 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

‘An enjoyable, sweeping and often touching tale of bravery ’
SFX

‘This is a rip-roaring adventure story; the pace rarely flags. There’s scheming, murder and betrayal aplenty’
Interzone

‘A vivid historical setting and a lengthy and satisfying plot’
Publishing News

From the Back Cover

In the summer of 405AD, Irish raiders attack the western coast of Wales, carving a fiery swathe through the peaceful countryside. Among the survivors who are rounded up and taken back to Ireland is Succat: an impulsive sixteen-year-old son of a powerful Roman family.

Succat is sold as a slave and put to work tending sheep. Repeated escape attempts lead to ever more brutal and savage beatings, until he comes to the attention of Cormac, a young novice Druid. The two strike up an unlikely friendship and, as Succat learns the ways of the Irish people, he is given a new name by the Druid: Patrick.

With a new name begins Patrick’s new life: he is married, and the two decide to return to his home to claim his inheritance, only to find his father’s estate in ruins. So begins a calamitous journey that will lead him to Tours; see him join the Roman Legion as a soldier; suffer the the horrors of a plague-filled Rome; and thence back to Ireland, where he will embark on a mission for which his name will be remembered throughout history.

In the spirit of Bernard Cornwell's Arthurian cycle, Patrick is a gritty and unsentimental portrait of one of the Western world's great icons, featuring an accurate and compelling rendering of the historical period – an era full of brutal conflict, adventure, turmoil, and visionary inspiration.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
4.3 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Quality Lawhead Novel 9 Mar 2004
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This is another enjoyable novel from one of the most consistent authors in the fantasy/ historical fiction genre. Lawhead is the Original and still the Best when it comes to Celtic historical fiction, and Patrick doesn't disappoint. This book, unlike some of his others, is easy to get into, and while the middle is not as good as the beginning or end, the overall quality of the book deserves 5 stars.
Lawhead again shows himself to be ahead of his time, as there is a Hollywood film about Patrick coming out which will no doubt bring interest to Lawhead's work. If you want to read the best and most imaginative account of St. Patricks life, you need to start here.
Do yourself a favour, buy Patrick, find a comfortable place, turn off your phone, and immerse yourself in Lawhead's world, just remember that you have to sleep at some point!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good read, but curiously flat in parts 18 Nov 2004
Format:Paperback
Stephen Lawhead's take on Patrick is a bit of a curate's egg - good and bad in parts. It shares a number of themes with Lawhead's other works - like a good evocation of the celtic world; a rather mystical and almost pantheist view of religion, contrasted with the rigidity and authoriarianism of Roman Christianity; and a warts-and-all take on significant characters in history.
However, there are serious flaws which mar the book for me. There is a big gap between the final section of the book and the epilogue, in which Patrick finds the conviction he has been lacking throughout the text and lights his bonfire before that of the High King - providing the catalyst for the conversion of Ireland. But the story of how he gets to that point from his return to Ireland is absent. We are left with a fulfillment of the prophecy of the druids which feels a bit too pat - Prince Hamlet suddenly metamorphoses into Dan Dare.
There are other diappointments. Normally Lawhead has a real talent for evoking a sense of place, but this is almost wholly missing in the Irish sections, as previous reviewers have remarked, but also in the British sections. Patrick's homecoming journey north should be a triumphantly drawn, but it is lifeless and barely memorable.
There are also some elementary errors, like the information thast Sliamh Mis is in the North West of Ireland, when it is in the North East; this causes problems with the passages that deal with Succat's escape.
However, there are parts of the book which are very good, and it still manages to draw the reader in. The Roman and Gaulish sections are particuarly lively and well-depicted.
Overall the book manages to be greater than the sum of its parts, but only just.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Flawed gem 17 Jun 2004
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
I feel a bit mean only giving this book three stars. The beginning and latter parts of the book are definately worth 4 or even 5 stars. However the book is let down by the Irish section, and an epilogue which I found a bit spiritually far fetched.
Lawhead has developed a powerful talent for evoking the past warts and all. This came across particularly in the Roman section of the book - which I guess was also the most well researched. He has also developed his skills as a story teller. Compared to the slow, almost languid start of Byzantium (a better book overall), Patrick starts like a rocket. Succat (Patrick) finding himself in Ireland by page 24.
The book's flaw is in the section concerning the druids. While most of the books's characters are well drawn, the evil druid Buinne is a caricature. While I think Lawhead is right to be sceptical of the established church of Patrick's day I found the concept of Christianity being spread through Ireland by a druid sect a bit far fetched. Is there any historical basis for this?
Overall, though I enjoyed this book. Worth reading.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
Although I have given this this five stars it is not as good as Byzantium by Lawhead (just read both!) but i would still definately recommend it to anyone. At a certain point in the book you feel it gets slightly tedious with Patricks attempts at freedom from shepherding, looking back you can see how tedious it was for the character! A great story none-the-less! Well worth reading and enjoying!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not Great History but an Enjoyable Tale 1 Jun 2009
Format:Mass Market Paperback
his is another good work from Stephen Lawhead, in which he uses his usual blend of history and myth to spin an engaging tale of one of Ireland's patron saints. Lawhead's feeling for the period, and his love of all things Celtic shines through as strongly as his usual redemptive Christian message. However he departs a long way from what we know of the historical Patrick. Don't mistake that for a lack of research though. He is well read in the extant literature on St Patrick - he just chooses to spin his tale in a direction that the literature does not always lead.

As long as you don't use this as a historical source book, there is much to enjoy in this story. My only criticism is that, having read quite a lot of Lawhead this year, I am beginning to find the formula for his books somewhat rehearsed. Not totally though - this is still a fine read.
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