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Path of the Incubus (Dark Eldar) Paperback – 14 Feb 2013


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Paperback, 14 Feb 2013


Product details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: The Black Library (14 Feb 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849702993
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849702997
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 2.5 x 17.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 362,901 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

A veteran writer for the Warhammer 40,000 universe with more than twenty years' experience creating worlds dominated by war machines, spaceships and dangerous aliens. Andy worked at Games Workshop as lead designer of the Warhammer 40,000 miniatures game for three editions before moving to the PC gaming market to work on the hit real time strategy game Starcraft 2 by Blizzard Entertainment. Andy has written several short stories and two novels for Black Library, Survival Instinct and Path of the Renegade.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Mitchel M. Pays on 17 Sep 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm a 40k addict i admit it.

Now thats over let me just say i do love books in general, all different genres by many different authors, but i do read a lot of 40k fiction. They seem to just let the better writers write on the Heresy novels, after reading the first two novels in this series i can see Andy Chambers being there soon as the series so far is superb, epic even.

As to why it is so good..... the answer is simple, the character development. Without giving any clues or spoilers, the characters are not human but Dark Eldar and the reason the novels thus far have been so good is that the characters are not written with human personalities but grotesque extremes of human nature. Fans of 40k will love the difference of reading about a race so alien to the Imperium or the Astartes, yet you warm to these character and want to know how they inter weave especially Motley and Morr.

i don't want to go into the plot, i do recommend reading the first novel before this though as not only is it good but it sets up this one, just pick them up start reading and enjoy the ride.
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Format: Paperback
Path of the Incubus picks up immediately where the previous book, Path of the Renegade left off, with Motley and Morr pursued by shadowy assailants keen to make Morr pay for his perceived part in the Dysjunction which began at the end of the first book. The central relationship between Motley and Morr and their exchanges make up many of the highlights of the story, with both characters true to how they behaved in the first book, as well as being true to how their units are represented within the tabletop game. There are, however, a few jarring turns of phrase that seem to have slipped past the editor, which sound a little out of kilter with the language used throughout the rest of the book. This book also seems to suffer from the almost slavish need to accommodate every Dark Eldar unit it possibly can, to the extent where it seems almost like they're shoehorned in. This could have been a problem in the first book, but was nowhere near as noticeable - it seemed justified that mandrakes showed up, for example - but in this book it's as if Chambers feels compelled to include the whole range of Dark Eldar society. Presumably this is because they're one of the less popular factions within the 40K universe, so he might as well get as many of them in as possible so nobody feels like anything's missing. It's implied throughout both this book and the previous one that the backstabbing and intrigue of Kabalite politics alone could fill tomes; ironic, then that it apparently can't, as inter-kabal politics are hinted at but never amount to much more than vague references.
In terms of plotting, the book zips along fairly quickly for the most part - it shouldn't offer up more than a few days of reasonable entertainment - but parts of it feel a little improvised, if that's the right word.
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By quiet gon on 21 July 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
brilliant and insane and evil. everything ya didnt wnat to know about the dark kin and yet ya cant look away.
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By Andrew Taylor on 11 May 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Another product bought as a present but she loved the read and is hoping that more come out in the future.
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