A Passage to India and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£1.70
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Dusty Air
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has been read however all pages are very much intact as is the cover. Some minor wear, and may have some writing and highlights.
Add to Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Passage to India Mass Market Paperback – 26 Oct 1989


See all 88 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback, 26 Oct 1989
£7.03 £0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£5.67
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd; New edition edition (26 Oct 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140180761
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140180763
  • Product Dimensions: 2.1 x 12.8 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 603,441 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
Except for the Marabar Caves - and they are twenty miles off - the city of Chandrapore presents nothing extraordinary. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 17 Mar 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In this perhaps best novel by Forster, the reader is magnificently transported to the India of the British Raj by means of an acute sense of observation, humour, and understanding of both the Indian and British dilemmas. If you've been to India, you'll recognize it, if you haven't, here's a chance to meet it at its imperical zenith. It's a heart-warming novel, and the characters will stay with you for years. You may also enjoy it simply for the language, which Forster truly has in his power. I've read it four times, I've taught it and recommended to many different people, and I've never known anyone to be disappointed!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 Jun 2000
Format: Paperback
When I first picked up Forster's classic novel, I wasn't sure what to expect. As a modern, 21st century reader, a book about colonial India didn't seem particularly appealing. However, A Passage to India exceeded all my expectations. The characters were both believeable and convincing but what is most striking are Forster's descriptions of setting. He brings India to life so that we not only see what it was like to live there, we almost hear and smell it too! I know that Forster's book has its flaws and is not always completely accurate but it is still one of the most important novels concerning the conflict between rulers and natives around. Read it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Ford Ka VINE VOICE on 23 July 2009
Format: Hardcover
Almost a century after the book's publication the most crucial problems it discussed are as current as they were during Forster's life. The impossibility of communicating across the divide of culture, religion, and race, seems to be even more alive then when he saw it. The value of the novel lies not so much in representing it but in the fact that Forster offers a way out - personal contact.
The story takes us to India of the 1920s - we follow the path of a young Englishwoman who goes to marry a British official but wants to know "the real India". This she never achieves but she gets to know something by far more important - herself. Her inept attempts at connecting with India and Indians make other characters of the novel learn more about themselves, force them out of safe shells in which they lived. The lesson is painful but at least for some of the characters opens the door to a better life.
There is little chance people will suddenly like Muslims, Pakistanis, gays, lesbians, Moroccans, Turkish, Kurds etc etc - there is a chance (a very slim chance, Forster would be quick to add) that a specific American and a specific Muslim, a Turk and a Kurd, an Israeli and a Palestinian can be friends. The world may not want it, the people that surround them may not want it but the results depend on us alone. If we do not try we only have ourselves to blame.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By banks10 on 6 Mar 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Knowing a bit of Forsters history, this novel was truly interesting for me to read. Although I brought it for university (it being a book I wouldnt ordinarily have chosen), I can honestly say I really enjoyed it. Its one that stays with you for ages after you've finished it. Anyone who read 'Maurice' and enjoyed it, should try this one!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Felix Valencia on 3 Nov 2012
Format: Paperback
In a world far removed from the one in which Forster was writing, is there any place for a novel like A Passage to India other than as an idle curiosity of a bygone era? Written based on first hand experience of the British Raj, this open critique of colonialism caricatures the Anglo-Indian in his element, questioning the morality and justification of the British presence in the subcontinent.

A Passage to India is built upon its characters, who are the led through a fairly mundane plot, a jejune stage for the actors to perform upon. Yet through their actions, we discover this world of Empire, where Anglo-Indians hold themselves aloof from the population, where relationships are grounded on the basis of ruler and ruled. Forster challenges the British Raj as it was then. But he also poses questions relevant to our everyday lives: can the cultures of East and West ever truly understand one another? is it possible even for two individuals to truly understand one another? can anything good ever come from a relationship in which one party dominates the other? and what can we really understand about 'identity' through the prism of nationhood?

There is no doubt much in this book which can be analysed and overanalysed to the nauseating degree that only a literature class can provoke, and I can imagine that many who studied this novel in a classroom environment learned only to hate it. Where the simplicity of the plot provides only a thread for the characters to follow, the imagery of India's weather and terrain, her townships and cultural diversity, combine to provide symbolic tapestry lending itself to interpretation.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
This much lauded and loved book was of interest in terms of its subject matter, absorbing in respect of its observations but far less so in respect of its plot. Its key plot moment rested on an event which was hardly credible from either proponent and that event’s conclusion arrived 70% of the way through the book with the remaining 30% concerned with its repercussions years hence. I am glad I read it yet was also glad to have finished it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

Look for similar items by category


Feedback