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Rite of Passage (The Gregg Press Science Fiction Series) Hardcover – Jun 1976


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£7.25 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we dispatch the item. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Gazelle Book Services Ltd; New edition edition (Jun 1976)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0839823363
  • ISBN-13: 978-0839823360
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 7,493,633 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Alianor on 5 Oct 2005
Format: Paperback
I first read this book more than 20 years ago. I remembered some of the basics of the plot but not too much more. It's the story of Mia Havero, aged 12 when the story begins and 14 when it ends. She's one of a number of priviledged survivors of a catastrophe, caused by unlimited population growth, which destroyed Planet Earth. She lives on a spaceship created in an asteroid, with access to education and technology, while less fortunate descendants of Earth's survivors live on colonies on planets scattered throughout the galaxy. In order to control population growth, the citizens of the Ships are sent down to planets for 30 days after they turn 14, to survive as best they can with some pretty extensive training and a limited amount of supplies and tools. This is the Rite of Passage.
The story is told in 1st person and at times I felt it went into a bit too much detail, but Mia's voice is very convincing and I was impressed that the author -- who I think was in his 20s at the time he wrote this -- could write from the point of view of an adolescent girl so well. The future society he's created is very interesting and the book is a fast, easy read. But it's not simple. It raises a lot of moral questions which, when I read the book for the first time in my teens, mostly passed me by. After rereading it recently, I was left feeling actually quite shocked by the ending. The book is very thought-provoking, and like the best science fiction, it raises more questions than it answers. Highly recommended -- I gave it 4 stars only because I think it could have been a bit more tightly written and/or edited.
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Format: Paperback
I first read this book more than 20 years ago. I remembered some of the basics of the plot but not too much more. It's the story of Mia Havero, aged 12 when the story begins and 14 when it ends. She's one of a number of priviledged survivors of a catastrophe, caused by unlimited population growth, which destroyed Planet Earth. She lives on a spaceship created in an asteroid, with access to education and technology, while less fortunate descendants of Earth's survivors live on colonies on planets scattered throughout the galaxy. In order to control population growth, the citizens of the Ships are sent down to planets for 30 days after they turn 14, to survive as best they can with some pretty extensive training and a limited amount of supplies and tools. This is the Rite of Passage.
The story is told in 1st person and at times I felt it went into a bit too much detail, but Mia's voice is very convincing and I was impressed that the author -- who I think was in his 20s at the time he wrote this -- could write from the point of view of an adolescent girl so well. The future society he's created is very interesting and the book is a fast, easy read. But it's not simple. It raises a lot of moral questions which, when I read the book for the first time in my teens, mostly passed me by. After rereading it recently, I was left feeling actually quite shocked by the ending. The book is very thought-provoking, and like the best science fiction, it raises more questions than it answers. Highly recommended -- I gave it 4 stars only because I think it could have been a bit more tightly written and/or edited.
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By "harry80" on 5 Sep 2003
Format: Paperback
I borrowed this book from an aqcuaintance a few years ago and have been looking for it ever since. I truly enjoyed it the first time, found it to be an inspired tale and a very well written insight into the mind of a twelve year old girl given that the author is neither female nor twelve years of age when he wrote the book (to my limited knowledge).
I really enjoyed the attention to detail; of a world which doesn't (yet) exist, of the thought processes of the main characters. I felt that although the main character, Mia Havero, is going through a maturing process designed to bring her to adulthood, she still maintains the thoughts and feelings of a 'normal' teenager. She is no 'genius child of the future', just an ordinary kid with ordinary feelings who is thrust into a situation she has little or no control over.
I thought that it reflected real-life to a degree, although metaphorically, as all young people go through an experience in life that defines the person they later become.
On a lighter note, it is also a really good read, with excitement and new ideas, colourful characters and a complete story that leaves you mildly interested in what might happen next but not chomping at the bit for a sequel.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. B. Rose on 1 July 2008
Format: Paperback
Other reviewers have told you about the story.
This book is one of the unforgettables, with a permanent place in my library. I re-read it every few years, often finding something new in it.
An outstanding piece of work.
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