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Pass Me By/Big Spender Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered


Price: 14.98
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Frequently Bought Together

Pass Me By/Big Spender + Things Are Swingin'/Jump for Joy + The Man I Love / If You Go
Price For All Three: 28.95

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Product details

  • Audio CD (1 Oct 2001)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Parlophone
  • ASIN: B00005NKB7
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 243,195 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Sneakin' Up On You
2. Pass Me By
3. I Wanna Be Around
4. Bewitched
5. My Love, Forgive Me
6. You Always Hurt the One You Love
7. A Hard Days Night
8. Love
9. Dear Heart
10. Quiet Nights
11. That's What It Takes
12. Come Back to Me
13. You've Got Possibilities
14. It's a Wonderful World
15. I'll Only Miss Him When I Think Of Him
16. Big Spender
17. I Must Know
18. Alright, Okay, You Win
19. Watch What Happens
20. You Don't Know
See all 22 tracks on this disc

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Roger Rebec VINE VOICE on 15 Dec 2001
Format: Audio CD
The material, arrangements and performances on both these albums are good but collectively the whole adds up to less than the sum of its parts. When you reach the end, there is a feeling of routine. good though each track is individually, there is nothing to make you sit up, listen and say "Wow! I want to hear that again". If you like Peggy Lee, it's worth getting but it definitely lacks the inspiration of, say, "Latin ala Lee".
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Peter Durward Harris #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 9 Sep 2002
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
These two albums from the sixties, both produced by David Cavanaugh, show Peggy at the very peak of her career. Here, you will find Peggy singing songs from the Great American Songbook, together with more contemporary material, such as the Beatles' A hard day's night. Peggy clearly put a lot of thought into this track, to put her own distinctive identity on the song without changing it's character.
Another track that I particularly like is Big spender. To my ears, Peggy's version is far superior to the nore famous version by Shirley Bassey. Peggy shows her determination to get her man without sounding threatening in the way that Shirley does.
There is a great mix of songs here - it's generally more uptempo than some of Peggy's albums. If you are used to hearing Peggy singing lots of soft, romantic songs, you might be pleasantly surprised by this twofer. I love Peggy singing those songs, but there are plenty of other albums full of them.
This twofer demonstrates that Peggy was more versatile than some would have you believe. And it's every bit as good as the romantic stuff - just different.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. C. B. Stone on 29 Jan 2009
Format: Audio CD
I bought this CD for friends who were married in 1965 when Pass Me By was so very popular and became "their" song. They had no idea that brand new copies were still available and are absolutely delighted with it!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
Peggy In The Beatle-Mania Era 19 Mar 2004
By Robert Usher - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Peggy Lee was a true talent who had enjoyed long and very successful associations with two major labels (Decca and Capitol). But by the time these two albums were issued in the mid-sixties, Peggy, like so many of her mainstream contempararies, found herself caught in the backwash of Beatle-Mania. It was a time of transition for the major labels, whose focus and direction had been irrevocably altered by the British Invasion and emergence of baby boomers as the primary marketing segment. As was the case with her contemporaries, Peggy's artistic heritage and style was not perceived to mesh well (at least in the eyes of record company executives) with this new marketing environment. That perception often resulted in attempts by producers to "update" their artists' images by insisting on the inclusion of material which, although contemporary, was not necessarily appropriate. Artistry was irrelevant. The main idea was to create an album that would "sell". Stan Kenton's woeful interpretation of the music from the Broadway show "Hair" (long and deservedly out-of-print) is a prime example. Anyone who has ever heard that album will know what I am talking about. The two albums included in this CD are emblematic of the changes taking place in the record biz, and their effect on mainstream artists such as Peggy Lee. The obligatory "contemporary pop" tunes are sprinkled here and there. Peggy does a valiant job with pop ditties such as "Hard Days Night". But it is in the traditional and quasi-tradtional material, especially the show tunes, where she truly shines. These are what make this CD more than worth the price of admission. For those too young or too cluless to remember, the sixties where not only about The Beatles and the emergence of Hard Rock. A lot of great, if faintly remembered, material was written in the sixties as well. "Watch What Happens", "Come Back To Me", "You've Got Possibilities", "I Must Know" (written by Neal "Batman" Hefti) to name four. Peggy's "Big Spender" has always been, to my mind, THE definitive rendition of Sy Coleman's great compositon for the Broadway Show "Sweet Charity". And it is (to my mind, at least) the centerpiece of this CD. Peggy is at her seductive vampish best, and the soaring big band arrangement by Dave Grusin provides a perfect backdrop. Forget the Beatles -- THIS was sixties music at its BEST. Had the entire CD contained material like this, it would rate TEN stars. One humorous footnote: The song "Bewitched" is attributed to Rogers and Hart in the updated liner notes. It is, in fact, the theme song from the sixties television series that starred Elizabeth Montgomery. I believe the editor has this song confused with "Bewitched, Bothered, and Bewildered", which was in fact written by Rogers and Hart. Guess the editor was too young (or too clueless??) to remember.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
More up-tempo than usual for Peggy 31 Aug 2002
By Peter Durward Harris - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
These two albums from the sixties, both produced by David Cavanaugh, show Peggy at the very peak of her career. Here, you will find Peggy singing songs from the Great American Songbook, together with more contemporary material, such as the Beatles' A hard day's night. Peggy clearly put a lot of thought into this track, to put her own distinctive identity on the song without changing it's character.

Another track that I particularly like is Big spender. To my ears, Peggy's version is far superior to the more famous version by Shirley Bassey. Peggy shows her determination to get her man without sounding threatening in the way that Shirley does.

There is a great mix of songs here - it's generally more up-tempo than some of Peggy's albums. If you are used to hearing Peggy singing lots of soft, romantic songs, you might be pleasantly surprised by this twofer. I love Peggy singing those songs, but there are plenty of other albums full of them.

This twofer demonstrates that Peggy was more versatile than some would have you believe. And it's every bit as good as the romantic stuff - just different.
THINGS REALLY ARE SWINGIN' 20 Jan 2014
By Cody Robert at Spokane - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I could jump for joy because things really are swingin' on PASS ME BY with Lou Levy's extraordinary "head arrangements." Improvisation is the very soul of American jazz, and this album works both as a classic Peggy Lee jazz set (cf. BLACK COFFEE or MISS PEGGY LEE SINGS THE BLUES) and as a mainstream commercial entry from her richest and most consistent career phase. It is consistently superb, Peggy Lee at her most energized and exuberant. Jump for joy, indeed.

It would be illuminating to hear rehearsal tapes and outtakes from these sessions. The Capitol engineers must have worked major overtime to ready these tracks for commercial release and to please the mercurially perfectionist Peggy Lee. They certainly had prior experience; check out the fascinating liner notes for the CD rerelease of BEAUTY AND THE BEAT! (1959). Then in the banner year 1961 the mobile team recorded three legendary gigs, Miss Peggy Lee at Basin Street East, Judy Garland at Carnegie Hall and, not least, Hank Thompson at the Golden Nugget. This was Capitol's maturity as a progressive label and a Golden Age of stereo-on-tape.

BIG SPENDER is less a unified concept album than a selection of very cool tracks. Miss Lee's live performances of the title cut, channeling Mae West, are legendary and perfect examples of her innuendo-laden "Less is more" stage presence. These albums are Peggy Lee's solidest achievements in the late 1960s doldrums leading up to her reinvention with IS THAT ALL THERE IS?
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