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Paris Review Issue 200 (Spring 2012) Paperback – 26 Apr 2012


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Product details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Canongate Books Ltd; Spring 2012 edition (26 April 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0857867407
  • ISBN-13: 978-0857867407
  • Product Dimensions: 15.8 x 1.5 x 23.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,117,814 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

One of the few truly essential literary magazines of the twentieth century - and now of the twenty-first. Frequently weird, always wonderful - Margaret Atwood

About the Author

The Paris Review was founded in 1953 and has published early and important work by Philip Roth, V.S. Naipaul, Jeffrey Eugenides, A.S. Byatt, T.C. Boyle, William T. Vollmann and many other writers who have given us great literature of the past half century. Philip Gourevitch was named editor of The Paris Review in 2005, succeeding George Plimpton, who was editor from 1953 until his death in 2003. Lorin Stein is the current editor.

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By Lost John TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 22 Dec. 2012
In this, its 200th issue, The Paris Review published pieces by some of its highest-flying and longest-standing contributors. Frederick Seidel, who opens the magazine with no less than five poems, is both high-flying and long-standing. An editor's note tells us he first joined the staff of the Paris Review in 1961. Adrienne Rich, who sadly died around the time of publication of this issue in Spring 2012, contributes 'Itinerary', and her first Paris Review poem was published in its second issue.

A couple of other pieces had a long gestation period. John Jeremiah Sullivan's contribution represents seven years of research, we are told. It opens in eighteenth century Saxony, moves to the Carolinas, and returns to Saxony, via London, with two Native American slaves. Covered in tattoos, the men were exhibited as a novelty. It is pleasing to note that although that proved lucrative for a time, the public soon grew tired of the spectacle.

Jeff Dyer, a contemporary big name, introduces a portfolio of monochrome photographs by Prabuddah Dasgupta, and the two author interviews in this issue are with big names, Brett Easton Ellis and the late Terry Southern. The interview with Terry Southern was conducted in 1967. (The reasons for the delay in publication are explained.) Published in 2012, it is nevertheless only the third interview in the Paris Review's 'The Art of Screenwriting' series. The Brett Easton Ellis interview is number 216 in 'The Art of Fiction' series, and is admittedly primarily about Ellis's novels. However, Ellis is not currently writing for the printed page but for film and TV.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
The Venerable Paris Review 22 Dec. 2012
By Lost John - Published on Amazon.com
In this, its 200th issue, The Paris Review published pieces by some of its highest-flying and longest-standing contributors. Frederick Seidel, who opens the magazine with no less than five poems, is both high-flying and long-standing. An editor's note tells us he first joined the staff of the Paris Review in 1961. Adrienne Rich, who sadly died around the time of publication of this issue in Spring 2012, contributes 'Itinerary', and her first Paris Review poem was published in its second issue.

A couple of other pieces had a long gestation period. John Jeremiah Sullivan's contribution represents seven years of research. It opens in eighteenth century Saxony, moves to the Carolinas, and returns to Saxony, via London, with two Native American slaves. Covered in tattoos, the men were exhibited as a novelty. It is pleasing to note that although that proved lucrative for a time, the public soon grew tired of the spectacle.

Jeff Dyer, a contemporary big name, introduces a portfolio of monochrome photographs by Prabuddah Dasgupta, and the two author interviews in this issue are with big names, Brett Easton Ellis and the late Terry Southern. The interview with Terry Southern was conducted in 1967. (The reasons for the delay in publication are explained.) Published in 2012, it is nevertheless only the third interview in the Paris Review's 'The Art of Screenwriting' series. The Brett Easton Ellis interview is number 216 in 'The Art of Fiction' series, and is admittedly primarily about Ellis's novels. However, Ellis is not currently writing for the printed page but for film and TV. He makes it clear that is where his interest now lies, and says enough about writing for Hollywood today to make the interview the perfect companion piece for the view of 1960's screenwriting gained from Terry Southern.

A paint sample chart - Dishwater Blonde, Bible Black, Graham Greene, etc., etc. - compiled by Leanne Shapton and Ben Schott is a lot of fun, and their notes most revealing. Dishwater Blonde is found in Jeffrey Eugenides's 'A Virgin Suicide', Bible Black in Dylan Thomas's 'Under Milk Wood', and so on through 84 samples. Shapton and Schott call their piece 'Prose Purple'.

More poetry is provided by Susan Barbour, Stephen Dunn, Yusef Komunyakaa, Maureen N MacLane, Nicanor Parra and Rowan Ricardo Phillips. David Searcy offers his essay 'El Camino Doloroso', and fiction is from David Means, Matt Somel and Lorrie Moore. I was personally much taken with Lorrie Moore's story, 'Wings', and note that although younger than the now venerable Paris Review, she nevertheless first contributed 20 years ago.
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