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Paradise Lost & Paradise Regai (Signet Classic Poetry) Mass Market Paperback – 18 Apr 2002


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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Dutton / Signet; Reprint edition (18 April 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451527925
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451527929
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 2.2 x 17 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,923,072 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

John Milton was born on 9 December 1608 in Cheapside,
London. He published little until the appearance of Poems of Mr
John Milton, both English and Latin in 1646, when he was 37. By
this time he was deeply committed to a political vocation, and
became an articulate and increasingly indispensable spokesman for
the Independent cause. He wrote the crucial justifications for the
trial and execution of Charles I, and, as Secretary for Foreign
Tongues to the Council of State, was the voice of the English revolution
to the world at large. After the failure of the Commonwealth
he was briefly imprisoned; blind and in straitened circumstances
he returned to poetry, and in 1667 published a ten-book version
of Paradise Lost, his biblical epic written, as he put it, after 'long
choosing, and beginning late'. In 1671, Paradise Regained and
Samson Agonistes appeared, followed two years later by an expanded
edition of his shorter poems. The canon was completed in 1674, the
year of his death, with the appearance of the twelve-book Paradise
Lost, which became a classic almost immediately. His influence on
English poetry and criticism has been incalculable.

Product Description

Review

"Offers an intensely filmic description of the events that countless artists have sought to visualise" The Times "Milton represents the English imagination at its most organised, disciplined and sublime" -- Tom Paulin Guardian "Never was a work of literature so imbued with the visual. He creates a universe that never existed, and paints it so you see it and are overwhelmed by its immensity, its magnificent splendour at the top end, the great dark plains and huge rocky mountains, the fires and storms at the other - and the horror of the void between" -- Julian Rathbone Independent "I read Paradise Lost when I was 11, and it made me suddenly realise that the Devil was sexy, which was quite muddling at that age and had disastrous consequences in that I then lusted after unsuitable men for the rest of my life" -- Jilly Cooper Daily Mail "When the blind John Milton came to retell the story of Genesis in book seven of Paradise Lost he dwelt with understandable poignancy on the sheer visual loveliness of the newly created world. Anyone who thinks Milton is a pedantic old bore should peruse the lines that celebrate the wonder and beauty of birds' flight, migration and song" Financial Times

About the Author

John Milton was born on 9 December 1608. He studied at St Paul's School and then at Christ's College, Cambridge. He wrote poetry in Latin and Italian as well as English and travelled in Italy between 1638 and 1639. He married Mary Powell in 1642 but their relationship quickly broke down and they lived apart until 1645. They had four children, three daughters and a son who died in infancy. During the Interregnum after the execution of Charles I, Milton worked for the civil service and wrote pamphlets in support of the new republic. He also began work on his masterpiece, Paradise Lost, as early as 1642. His first wife died in 1652 and he married again in 1656, although his second wife died not long afterwards in 1658. When the monarchy was restored in 1660 Milton was arrested but was released with a fine. In 1663 he married his third wife, Elizabeth Minshull and he is also thought to have finished Paradise Lost in this same year. He published the companion poem, Paradise Regained, in 1671.John Milton died on 8 November 1674.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
This first Book proposes first in brief the whole Subject, Man's disobedience, and the loss thereupon of Paradise, wherein he was plac't: Then touches the prime cause of his fall, the Serpent, or rather Satan in the Serpent; who revolting from God, and drawing to his side many Legions of Angels, was by the command of God driven out of Heaven with all his Crew into the great Deep. Read the first page
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

82 of 87 people found the following review helpful By Mr. P. E. Laughton on 9 April 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
It pains me to think that 'Paradise lost' sat gathering dust, unappreciated, on my shelf for over 2 years. Having tried about 3 times to wade into it, I'd find myself beaten back by its immensly dense, flowery language. But to anyone who is even remotely put off by the 'thee's and the 'thou's or who thinks that Milton is inaccessable to all but the most learned scholars I would implore you, you simply MUST read this book. Once you've made your way through the first few pages you'll be amazed at just how accessible this piece of literary genius is.
For those who don't know, this is an adaptation of the 'Genesis' creation myth, centering around the temptation of Adam and Eve by a rather disgruntled Satan. The poem begins with the expulsion of Satan and his rebel hoardes from the kingdom of heaven, and as he and his crew writhe in 'tartarean sulphure and strange fire', Milton guides us into a dark mythical world where armies of winged serephin clash with fallen rebel angels in battles of truly epic proportions, and where the fate of mankind hangs in the balance. Absolutely everything about this poem is epic and monumental, the subject matter, the language. And although there are times when Milton tends to waffle (I can hear the sound of a thousand English professors aghast with rage...!) but with Milton, when its good, its REALLY good.
This certainly isn't a book that you can skim read over coffee, you do have to work at it,(a dictionary to hand is advisable) but the rewards are massive. I found 'Paradise Lost' a truly enriching experience that I cannot praise highly enough. Thankfully I have Paradise Regained to look foward to.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kurt Messick HALL OF FAME on 27 Dec. 2005
Format: Paperback
Of Man's first disobedience and the fruit
Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste
Brought death into the world and all our woe,
With loss of Eden, till on greater Man
Restore us and regain the blissful seat
Sing, Heavenly Muse...
Not a lot people know that 'Paradise Lost' has as a much lesser known companion piece 'Paradise Regained'; of course, it was true during Milton's time as it is today that the more harrowing and juicy the story, the better it will likely be remembered and received.
This is not to cast any aspersion on this great poem, however. It has been called, with some justification, the greatest English epic poem. The line above, the first lines of the first book of the poem, is typical of the style throughout the epic, in vocabulary and syntax, in allusiveness. The word order tends toward the Latinate, with the object coming first and the verb coming after.
Milton follows many classical examples by personifying characters such as Death, Chaos, Mammon, and Sin. These characters interact with the more traditional Christian characters of Adam, Eve, Satan, various angels, and God. He takes as his basis the basic biblical text of the creation and fall of humanity (thus, 'Paradise Lost'), which has taken such hold in the English-speaking world that many images have attained in the popular mind an almost biblical truth to them (in much the same way that popular images of Hell owe much to Dante's Inferno). The text of Genesis was very much in vogue in the mid-1600s (much as it is today) and Paradise Lost attained an almost instant acclaim.
John Milton was an English cleric, a protestant who nonetheless had a great affinity for catholic Italy, and this duality of interests shows in much of his creative writing as well as his religious tracts.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mr James P on 16 Jan. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An excellent buy. Not only does this compilation contain '...regained', but it also has excellent illustrations. A worthwhile investment for anybody with even a passing interest in this area.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By James Cameron Thompson on 30 Aug. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Classics don't need reviewing. Mystical and wondrous. A window into Miltons view on the world in another time FAB..
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rev G D Osborne on 29 Mar. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
So good to be able to build up a library of classic titles on my iPad - Kindle books are a godsend.
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By Stephen Mogg on 5 July 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Something I should have read years ago
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Milton is the second-greatest English poet (after Shakespeare of course)and Paradise Lost is his masterpiece. The sequel, Paradise Regained, is sadly inferior but still has plenty of good things about it. (This is a comically short review, as I am aware. See volumes and volumes of criticism by experts.)
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One of the great masterpieces of literature but in Kindle format the text is absurdly spaced out that makes it nearly unreadable.
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