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Paradise Now Paperback – 15 May 2010


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Product details

  • Paperback: 349 pages
  • Publisher: Indepenpress Publishing Ltd (15 May 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1907499113
  • ISBN-13: 978-1907499111
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 19.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,593,380 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"A compelling writer" --Bristol Evening Post

"A compelling debut novel. Hilariously spiky prose, a twisty-turny path... A great job of describing unconditional love." --Bristol Review of Books

"An impressive book that wears its research lightly." --Chris Paling, author of Nimrod's Shadow

"Excellent. Nick Hornby meets George Orwell in Leo Tolstoy's lobby during an earthquake. An engrossing, well-paced read. Go buy it." --Ben Whitehouse, Greenbelt Festival

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr. M. J. Zeidler on 9 July 2010
Format: Paperback
Jari Moate is an excellent writer whose style reminds me of Ben Okri. The book is filled with delightful and surprising descriptive turns of phrase, and the story itself is shrouded with a sense of questing mystery. The main character, Elektra, is filled with uncertainty and her doubts raise questions which aren't neatly resolved. The book, once finished, isn't finished with you.
Set in Bristol, the plot centres on the convergent paths of a local artist who shoots unexpectedly to fame, and an Afghan shopkeeper who seeks to avenge injustice. The Company [sic] represents the forces of corporate greed, but the `bad guys' aren't a caricature of evil. The only parody is the main Company representative, whose exaggerated entrance seemed out of place and unconvincing. Having said that, his swagger faded and he became more credible as his insecurities gradually unravelled, leaked in private asides to Elektra.
There were a few passages in the book which I simply didn't understand, and although I wasn't clear exactly what was being said, it felt authentic. These were arty freestyle Bristol characters with their own smoky logic and language and the mood they created was tangible. The writing was at home. This flair for writing shines brightly as Jari turns on a very different style for the scenes in Afghanistan. Although most of the action unfolds in Bristol, the Afghan portions of the story are so engrossing that the balance feels strong and the stage is well set for different worlds to collide.
The twists and turns that finally bring the two main characters together work well, and the pulsing power of The Company grows and grows in the background, becoming a deafening roar as the pace quickens towards the end.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jo Jo on 5 Nov 2010
Format: Paperback
This book is one of the best I've read in ages. On one level a contemporary thriller, on another an astute look at the search for meaning and purpose across cultures and continents. I found myself reading long after the rest of the family had gone to bed and on one occasion my baby son woke me at 3am and instead of returning to bed I went downstairs to read another few chapters: I just had to see where things were leading! The book is intelligent, unpatronising and constantly surprising. I find myself still thinking about it now, weeks after reading it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Penny Woollard on 22 Jun 2010
Format: Paperback
Paradise Now by first-time novelist, Jari Moate, is pacy and intelligent interrogation of the spiritual awakenings that can be achieved by characters who, at first glance, may appear to languish in a peripheral environment lost to junk reality TV and the basest pleasures that can be enjoyed by seemingly lost souls. On a superficial level it can be read as a tale involving a group of city-dwelling friends who survive (just) on the edges of an artistic arena and who come face to face with the shocking realities of Islamic discontent with the West.

Happily, though, it works on many and deeper levels as the author sensitively directs his complex characters to delve intelligently into areas of existential angst and contemporary political dilemmas. The best compliment I can pay this book is that you will want to read it more than once to appreciate the author's varied and well-researched frame of references which ultimately and happily support the notion of redemptive faith.
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Format: Paperback
Great book. The story was buzzing round my head for days after. It's like Nick Hornby meets George Orwell in Leo Tolstoy's lobby during an earthquake! Loved it!
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