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Paradise Island: An Armchair Philosopher's Guide to Human Nature (or "Life Lessons You Learn While Surviving Paradise") [Kindle Edition]

Brandon Royal
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Print List Price: £5.45
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Book Description

Are We Masters of or Servants to Our Own Human Nature?

This illustrated, short novel presents a satire on human nature. “Human nature” are two words that are used often, but what exactly do they mean? This work explores, in narrative form, that mysterious collage of traits, emotions, and idiosyncrasies that describes the way we are and the way we behave — our envy, vanity, greed, and white lies as well as our loyalty, generosity, love, and honor.

Paradise Island is a fable about a young adventurer who travels to the sunny, fun-filled island of his dreams, but struggles to keep paradise found from becoming paradise lost. A product of inspirational and literary fiction, this work will appeal to readers interested in fantasy, satire, and philosophy in fiction.

Product Description

Review

“A delectable dish of human foible, served with parsnips baked in irony oil, all topped with a sprinkling of satire-roasted fennel seeds.”

—Justin Hurwitz, Editor, The Harvard Lampoon

Book Description

Are we masters of or servants to our own human nature? This illustrated, short novel presents a satire on human nature. “Human nature” are two words that are used often, but what exactly do they mean? This work explores, in narrative form, that mysterious collage of traits, emotions, and idiosyncrasies that describes the way we are and the way we behave — our envy, vanity, greed, and white lies as well as our loyalty, generosity, love, and honor.



Paradise Island is a fable about a young adventurer who travels to the sunny, fun-filled island of his dreams, but struggles to keep paradise found from becoming paradise lost. A product of inspirational and literary fiction, this work will appeal to readers interested in fantasy, satire, and philosophy in fiction.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3832 KB
  • Print Length: 82 pages
  • Publisher: Maven Publishing (27 Dec. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003YH9LOC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,497,422 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


More About the Author

Brandon Royal is an award-winning writer whose educational authorship includes The Little Blue Reasoning Book, The Little Red Writing Book, The Little Gold Grammar Book, The Little Red Writing Book Deluxe Edition, The Little Green Math Book, and Reasoning with Numbers. During his tenure working in Hong Kong for US-based Kaplan Educational Centers -- a Washington Post subsidiary and the largest test-preparation organization in the world -- Brandon honed his theories of teaching and education and developed a set of key learning "principles" to help define the basics of writing, grammar, math, and reasoning.

A Canadian by birth and graduate of the University of Chicago's Booth School of Business, his interest in writing began after completing writing courses at Harvard University. Since then he has authored a dozen books and reviews of his books have appeared in Time Asia magazine, Publishers Weekly, Library Journal of America, Midwest Book Review, The Asian Review of Books, Choice Reviews Online, Asia Times Online, and About.com. Brandon is a five-time winner of the International Book Awards, a five-time gold medalist at the President's Book Awards, as well as winner of the Global eBook Awards, USA Book News "Best Book Awards," and recipient of the 2011 "Educational Book of the Year" award as presented by the Book Publishers Association of Alberta.

To contact the author:
E-mail: contact@brandonroyal.com
Web site: www.brandonroyal.com

Customer Reviews

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3.5 out of 5 stars
3.5 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By Myst5d
Format:Paperback
How wonderful it would be to live in a locale such as Paradise Island where just stepping outside renews your soul. How exhilarating it would be to lay claim to that Paradise as a part-owner of a successful Island bar. How liberating it would feel to buy your very own island on which to build your dream house. And, how idyll it would be to exist with your exotic island love among the locals for a flavorful experience.

So how did the expats -- "those die-hard, no frills foreigners who have been on Paradise Island since the beginning of time" -- slip into a "state of apathy and decay?" Does it have something to do with not coming to grips with the "subjectivity of truth and the relativity of reality"?
This book will really have you thinking. Where I am now was once my dream for a perfect life, so why doesn't it feel so perfect now? Maybe it is but I just forgot.

Book your next quest to Paradise Island, and chart out the map of your soul.
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Was this review helpful to you?
2.0 out of 5 stars Is it just me, or...? 28 May 2015
Format:Paperback
The subtitle reads "An Armchair Philosopher's Guide to Human Nature (or "Life Lessons You Learn While Surviving Paradise")".
Admittedly, the lessons and alleged philosophical guidance of the book were quite lost on me; I read it as a story, and was in vain trying to make real hand and foot of it.

Still, it was a pleasurable read during my train trips to and from work and in the doctor's waiting room, because the writing style is elegant and sometimes witty. Also, it is short enough not to feel like a waste of time or to become so boring as to be put aside.

The book starts with the narrator making the acquaintance of The Map Maker, an old man who draws and occasionally sells maps. Some of the maps are accurately representing the real geography of places, while others are fantasy maps, adorned with vignettes and shown only to select customers. This has high potential for a really great story, but the book does not actually follow up on the fantastic idea. I have seen, though, that there is a book "The Map Maker" by the same author... it is tempting, but I fear I'll be in for disappointment if I download and read that one..

When the Map Maker dies, he leaves his journal to the narrator, and the rest of the book consists of excerpts from that journal, with additional philosophical comments by the narrator.
When the Map Maker was a young man, he travelled extensively, and somehow found his way to Paradise Island, where he drank, talked, listened, loved and lived long enough to co-own a bar and build a house.
So far, so good.

However, I do not feel like recommending this book as I maybe could have done, for one reason: In my opinion, it idealises and romanticises (does such a word exist in English?
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars  2 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How long can reality maintain the mirage of Paradise? 7 Dec. 2011
By Myst5d - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
How wonderful it would be to live in a locale such as Paradise Island where just stepping outside renews your soul. How exhilarating it would be to lay claim to that Paradise as a part-owner of a successful Island bar. How liberating it would feel to buy your very own island on which to build your dream house. And, how idyll it would be to exist with your exotic island love among the locals for a flavorful experience.

So how did the expats -- "those die-hard, no frills foreigners who have been on Paradise Island since the beginning of time" -- slip into a "state of apathy and decay?" Does it have something to do with not coming to grips with the "subjectivity of truth and the relativity of reality"?

This book will really have you thinking. Where I am now was once my dream for a perfect life, so why doesn't it feel so perfect now? Maybe it is but I just forgot.

Book your next quest to Paradise Island, and chart out the map of your soul.
2.0 out of 5 stars Maybe it's just me, but... 28 May 2015
By Meks Librarian - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
The subtitle reads "An Armchair Philosopher's Guide to Human Nature (or "Life Lessons You Learn While Surviving Paradise")".
Admittedly, the lessons and alleged philosophical guidance of the book were quite lost on me; I read it as a story, and was in vain trying to make real hand and foot of it.

Still, it was a pleasurable read during my train trips to and from work and in the doctor's waiting room, because the writing style is elegant and sometimes witty. Also, it is short enough not to feel like a waste of time or to become so boring as to be put aside.

The book starts with the narrator making the acquaintance of The Map Maker, an old man who draws and occasionally sells maps. Some of the maps are accurately representing the real geography of places, while others are fantasy maps, adorned with vignettes and shown only to select customers. This has high potential for a really great story, but the book does not actually follow up on the fantastic idea. I have seen, though, that there is a book "The Map Maker" by the same author... it is tempting, but I fear I'll be in for disappointment if I download and read that one..

When the Map Maker dies, he leaves his journal to the narrator, and the rest of the book consists of excerpts from that journal, with additional philosophical comments by the narrator.
When the Map Maker was a young man, he travelled extensively, and somehow found his way to Paradise Island, where he drank, talked, listened, loved and lived long enough to co-own a bar and build a house.
So far, so good.

However, I do not feel like recommending this book as I maybe could have done, for one reason: In my opinion, it idealises and romanticises (does such a word exist in English?) prostitution and drinking.
Those who know me personally know that I am far from being a prude; I don't mind explicit scenes (there aren't any here, really) in a book when they fit the story and are well written, and you all know that I do love my cocktails. But...
...I don't think it is all that "romantic" for young island women to work at bars where their job is to make rich travellers fall for their exotic beauty and spend a lot of money on drinks for them and themselves, and perform enticing dances and take the bar-goers as lovers who then are obliged to finance not only their girlfriends but also their entire, numerous families. It's prostitution, plain and simple, not love or romance.

So, in spite of those aspects that made the book pleasurable enough, I only give it 2 out of 5 stars. Maybe I was just being too stubborn to pick up on the philosophical lessons, and viewed the whole book too much from a female perspective (hardly surprising, none of the rich travelling bar-goers are women).

From the author's website I gather he has written several educational books (non-fiction) which sound far better than what I happened to come across here.
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