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The Parables of Grace Kindle Edition

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Length: 190 pages

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Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2523 KB
  • Print Length: 190 pages
  • Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing (31 Aug. 1988)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003UTTZAO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #422,724 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Amazon.com: HASH(0x97af4318) out of 5 stars 13 reviews
27 of 27 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9800d0e4) out of 5 stars The Modus Operandi of Grace 8 Aug. 2000
By Pam Hanna - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
So you thought you knew and understood the parables of Jesus? Take a look at Robert Farrar Capon's superb trilogy on the parables of the Kingdom, Grace and Judgment and see if they don't rattle your theological bird cage just a little. This volume is on the parables of Grace. The author again deals with lastness, leastness, lostness, littleness, left-handed images, death and resurrection, this time in such parables as the Lost Sheep, the Prodigal Son, and the Good Samaritan, among others. And he includes the hardest parable of all - the Unjust Steward of Luke 16.
I've always checked every book of Bible commentary to see what the author has to say about this parable, and so far, only Father Capon has come up with anything that makes sense to me. He says the unjust steward was wasting (diaskorpizon) his Lord's money. "Diaskorpizon" is the same word used for the Prodigal Son's wasting of his "substance." That's a clue, according to Capon, that this is a grace and not a morality parable. This is also like the parable of the Unforgiving Servant except that it's reversed. Forgiveness starts from the botom up instead of from the top down. It's the steward who forgives the debt (not the rich man or the Lord), and so he is a "dead ringer for Jesus Himself." He dies (to his bookkeeping) rises others (forgives their debts), but most important of all, "...the unjust steward is the Christ-figure because he is a crook, like Jesus."
"The unique contribution of this parable to our understanding of Jesus," says Capon, "is its insistence that grace cannot come to the world through respectability. Respectability regards only life, success, winning; it will have no truck with the grace that works by death and losing - which is the only kind of grace there is." Jesus was "...not respectable. He broke the sabbath. He consorted with crooks. And he dies as a criminal." And he did all this to "...catch a world that respectability could only terrify and condemn. He became sin for us sinners, weak for us weaklings, lost for us losers, and dead for us dead."
For my money, Father Capon is the only writer since C.S. Lewis and Thomas Merton who has even a clue about the true dynamics of the Christian Faith.
pamhan99@aol.com
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x98c3c2f4) out of 5 stars The Modus Operandi of Grace 26 Aug. 2000
By Pam Hanna - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
So you thought you knew and understood the parables of Jesus? Take another look - specifically at Robert Farrar Capon's superb trilogy on the parables of the Kingdom, Grace and Judgment. Guaranteed to rattle your theological bird cage. In this volume on the Grace parables (in which the author again deals with lastness, leastness, lostness, littleness, left-handed images, death and resurrection, in such parables as the Lost Sheep, the Prodigal Son, and the Good Samaritan, among others), he tackles the hardest parable of all - the Unjust Steward in Luke 16.
I've always checked every book of Bible commentary to see what the author has to say about this parable, and so far, only Father Capon has come up with anything that makes sense to me. He says the unjust steward was wasting (diaskorpizon) his Lord's money. "Diaskorpizon" is the same Greek word used for the Prodigal Son's wasting of his "substance." That's a clue, according to Capon, that this is a grace and not a morality parable. This is also like the parable of the Unforgiving Servant except that it's reversed. Forgiveness starts from the bottom up instead of from the top down. It's the Steward who forgives the debt, and so he is a "dead ringer for Jesus himself."
He dies (to his bookkeeping) raises others (forgives their debts), but most important of all, "...the unjust steward is the Christ-figure because he is a crook, like Jesus. The unique contribution of this parable to our understanding of Jesus is its insistence that grace cannot come to the world through respectability. Respectability regards only life, success, winning; it will have no truck with the grace that works by death and losing - which is the only kind of grace there is." Jesus was "...not respectable. He broke the sabbath. He consorted with crooks. And he dies as a criminal." He did it to "...catch a world that respectability could only terrify and condemn. He became sin for us sinners, weak for us weaklings, lost for us losers, and dead for us dead."
For my money, Father Capon is the only Christian writer since C.S. Lewis and Thomas Merton who has a clue about the true dynamics of the faith.
pamhan99@aol.com
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x97912960) out of 5 stars World Religion: The Parables of Grace Book Review 25 May 2013
By Student 150935 (HKIS) - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Written by Robert Farrar Capon, this is the second book in the trilogy of Jesus Christ's Parables. Capon discusses the short stories that the New Testament portrays. He goes beyond the simple analysis of these parables and discusses them in depth. His opinion is heavily present in the book and it is backed with evidence from the Bible itself. Capon provides context to each parable to give those, like me (who don't know the detailed sequences of stories in the Bible) a chance at understanding what is being said. Sometimes it is very difficult to translate the meanings of these parables into modern day terms. These seemingly hard task is taken on by Capon and he succeeds in conveying the morals of the parables so that the modern reader understands. The gap between a thousands of years ago and now is discussed. This involves going over how different words meant different things back then compared to what they mean now.

Capon realizes that the reader may not appreciate his ideas and opinions. However, he puts this aside, and throws ideas at you, hoping some will stick. He makes sure to keep a voice in his writing conveying things that remind the reader that he is being a little bit crazy. "I realize this is a long fetch from the parable of the coin in the fish's mouth, but I make no apologies. In fact, I end with something even farther fetched." (29).

Capon often uses verses from the Bible to set the scene of the parable he is discussing. "You are the salt of the earth," he says, "but if the salt has become insipid (literally become foolish), what in the world is there that can restore saltness to it? It is good for nothing except be thrown out and trampled on by people." Mark 9:49-50; Luke 14:34-35; Matt 5:13

After using the verse, Capon jumps in and will discuss it completely. I found this thorough analysis of that the salt in the parable represents very interesting. "Consider the imagery. Salt seasons and salt preserves, but in any significant quantity, it is not of itself edible, nourishing, or pleasant. On the basis of Jesus' comparison, therefore, we are presumably meant to understand that neither his paradoxical messiahship nor his disciples' witness to it." (34). This analysis is very interesting, and goes to show what Capon is all about. It is a good example to represent what the book discusses.

When I read this book I was reminded of the key events in the Bible. This is due to how Capon introduces the parables with a strong context of what happened before and after. I have gained some insight into how differently the verses of the Bible can be interpreted. I am going to end with one quote that stuck out to me and proved the most powerful in my opinion. It speaks of evil and goodness.

"Once again, the world cannot be saved by the living. And there are two devastatingly simple reasons why. The first is, we don't live well enough to do the job. Our goodness is flawed goodness. I love me children and you love yours, but we have, both of us, messed them up royally. The point is that if we are going to wait for good living to save the world, we are going to wait a long time. We can see goodness and we can love it. We can even love it enough to get a fair amount of it going for us on nice days. But we simply cannot crank it up to the level needed to eliminate badness altogether." (102). These life lessons have had an impact on me and are very powerful. These small experts speaking of humanities flaws and strengths have shaped my experience reading this book. Overall it has given me a new perspective on what the Bible means.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x98179090) out of 5 stars Up to Fr. Capon's usual standard of excellence 28 May 2013
By Douglas Steeples - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Robert F. Capon writes here with his customary trenchancy, grace, wit, and insight. An outstanding examination of Jesus' parables of grace, and a fit companion to his other two books on Christ's teachings through parables.
HASH(0x98d64024) out of 5 stars Insistence on justification through faith ! 31 May 2012
By Bill - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a relatively easy to read and lively book, which is unusual for theology.

A good thing about this book is that it encourages me to read the parables themselves to follow the author's flow.

However, the author's insistence on justification through faith alone is unconvincing to me personally. So, I was following his discussion and often saying to myself: No ! No !

The author's point of view (justification by faith alone) is sometimes repetitive.

So, I generally enjoyed the book, despite often disagreeing with the author's theological viewpoint.

I did enjoy his previous book, "Parables of the Kingdom", and I will read the following book "Parables of Judgement." All 3 Parable books are now published together as "Kingdom, Grace, Judgement" - that is the book you should buy now.

(In reply to an early comment concerning the Parable of the Unjust Steward, I found a very convincing explanation in "Jesus Through Middle Eastern Eyes" by Kenneth Bailey. I really enjoyed a lot of Mr. Bailey's discussions of the parables. )
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