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Paper Towns Paperback – 19 Dec 2013


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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Childrens; Reissue edition (19 Dec. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 140884818X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1408848180
  • Product Dimensions: 19.9 x 2.1 x 13 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (497 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 134 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

Imagine a hybrid of Scooby Doo and The Catcher in the Rye and you get a little of this novel's flavour (The Financial Times)

Green's prose is astounding - from hilarious, hyperintellectual trash talk and shtick, to complex philosophizing, to devastating observation and truths. He nails it - exactly how a thing feels, looks, affects - page after page (School Library Journal)

Genuine - and genuinely funny - dialogue, a satisfyingly tangled but not unbelievable mystery and delightful secondary characters (Kirkus Reviews)

Book Description

A boy, a girl, some clues and a brilliant road trip across America.

From New York Times bestselling author, John Green


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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

59 of 62 people found the following review helpful By Vicki @ Cosy Books TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 16 July 2010
Format: Paperback
To be totally honest, when I received this book for review I wasn't all that sure about it. Having never read any of John Green's previous work, I don't really know why this was other than I hated the cover. However I'm glad I was sent this one, as it turned out to be the most beautifully written story and I adored every minute.

Quentin (Q) has been infatuated with his next-door neighbour, Margo, since they were both 9 years old and were involved in a traumatic experience. But to Q, Margo is completely unobtainable; she's magical, courageous, wild and unique where as he's a bit of a geek, self conscious and timid. I wasn't expecting to like and relate to Q as much as I did, not being a teenage male myself. But I'm sure we've all known someone like Margo, who we see as so perfect but completely out of our league, and idolise so much they become almost godlike in our imaginations. He also has all the qualities required so that anyone, of any age can identify with him, with flaws as human as they come. He's a bit dorky, easily embarrassed, obsessive and impatient. He's also sensitive, thoughtful and loyal. Above all though, he's just a really nice kid and someone you would want to be friends with.

The other characters in the book are equally well rounded. Q's friends, Radar and Ben each have their own quirks, which make them completely believable. The dynamics and dialogue between the three miss-fit boys is superb, ranging from hysterically funny, cringe-worthy, contemplative and touching. I really liked seeing such close friendship from a male perspective, something I have rarely come across.
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62 of 66 people found the following review helpful By giantlawnmower on 30 July 2009
Format: Hardcover
It is difficult to write a book for any age group which manages to be funny, serious, interesting, gripping and realistic without losing some form of consistency or structure. But John Green, in his third novel, truly raises the bar. His characters are rich but they never shy from saying things startlingly real and believable. Q, for example, is the perfect teenager without every falling into cliche - he's a bit of a nerd but he's strong and commanding. Margo may be the 'oddball' but, even without personally being in the narrative for most of the book, proves to have depth that backs up her status. The plot is gripping, without driving the characters in any way that does not make perfect sense. The first part, for all it's random requests of Margo for Q gives us something stunningly romantic and original as a way to meet and understand the characters. I can not type higher praise for this book - personally, I think it is one of the books which has stayed with me the most since I first read it, full as it is of images I am sure I will never shake in my lifetime.

I would recommend anyone, young or old, to read this book. What it will give you is an experience that not only will you enjoy but that maybe you might get something out of. I live in the UK, and I had to buy this book on Amazon because it is not published here; apparently, the UK are not receptive to YA novels of this nature. All I can say is, it's a shocking indictment on us, and not the book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amanda Roper on 14 Jan. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Was a good read but was quite long and slow moving for what it was. I felt it needed a stronger plot to sustain interest and look at the characters in more depth. Still a well written and enjoyable book though :)
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By kbearreader on 3 Jan. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
From the other reviews I can see that this is mostly a well loved book, but I'm afraid it wasn't for me. I found the whole story to be somewhat unbelievable and inconsistent and really struggled to get through the corny dialogue without cringing. I found from the start that the way the three boys spoke to each other was very clichéd and really felt like an adult trying to imagine what young people would say to each other.

Unfortunately I also found the premise of the story itself to be very unconvincing; Q is an anxious and cautious person and yet takes relatively little persuasion by Margo to do a number of things which could clearly have a number of serious consequences.
Something he feels compelled to do despite barely knowing Margo.
The character of Lacey is also particularly inconsistent; we hear from Margo that she often makes snide comments and puts her down, but when she befriends Ben she appears to be nothing but pleasant and extremely worried about Margo.

There are aspects of the story which become quite compelling. I found myself reading out of a genuine want to know what happened to Margo. However, around the middle of the book the story drags a lot and I really had to trudge through it to get to the part where they find her again. During this time Q is particularly annoying as a character and really comes across as unnecessarily obsessed and melodramatic. I felt as a reader that it was very much clear that Margo was self-absorbed and inconsiderate, and found it frustrating that Q did not realise this until the point when he meets up with her again.

When they finally did find Margo, there was a huge anti-climax.
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