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Painkiller
 
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Painkiller

4 Mar 2002 | Format: MP3

4.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 6.99 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
6:05
2
3:36
3
3:57
4
3:34
5
4:47
6
5:44
7
4:49
8
5:44
9
0:56
10
6:48
11
5:21
12
3:39


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 25 Feb 2002
  • Release Date: 25 Feb 2002
  • Label: Columbia
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 55:00
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001GSBS5G
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,419 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Steven A. Wall on 20 May 2005
Format: Audio CD
After the critical flops of Turbo and (especially) Ram it Down, Priest really had something to prove to metal fans. This album, originally released in 1990, also came off the back of their infamous court case. This album takes all the pent up aggression and frustration the band must have felt, and unleashes them in a sonic display of fury. This album is like a metal fist to the face, it will leave you breathless in it's sheer relentless energy. Priest ditched kiddy-fiddler Dave Holland and appointed the awesome Scott Travis to the drum stool. His amazing double bass drum work really propells the Priest sound to dizzying heights, as Tipton, Halford, and Downing fully embraced the trash/power metal influences in to their writing style. The album can really be summed up in the first 2 minutes of the title track, in which the Priest effectively deploy all their sonic WMDs to maximum effect - Scott's drumming, Glenn and KK's riffing and Rob's scream. What follows is an utterly relentless metal onslaught - look up the definition of "heavy metal" in an encycopedia and there should be a picture of Painkiller! The only respite comes in the introductions to some of the songs, and the classy, menacing "Touch of Evil", which is the only slower track on the album (but no less powerful). In fact, the only criticism I could raise for the album is that it is so uncompromising - if you prefer the light and shade of, say, British Steel or Killing Machine, this may not be what you are looking for (try Angel of Retribition instead for a modern Priest album). As an exercise in demolishing their critics and their own self doubts, this stands head and shoulders above the rest of the Priest catalogue.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A. Stevenson on 24 Jun 2009
Format: Audio CD
Phew! What can you say that hasn't already been said? This album blew the cobwebs of hair metal straight out the door and good riddance to it.

Painkiller is serious Heavy Metal. A fast, frenzied, in your face, relentless charge through 10 slabs of pure, unadulterated metal. From the opening salvo of the title track things never let up. The drum intro to Painkiller from the newly appointed Scott Travis is breath taking. And while the tempo of the album never lets up until the slower (but none less heavy) Touch Of Evil, there is still enough melody and diversity in there. It isn't a thrash album, it's a classic old school metal album taken to the extreme.

There isn't a bad song on Painkiller and the highlights are obvious - Painkiller, All Guns Blazing, Leather Rebel, Night Crawler... oh heck, they're all good. But my personal favourite is One Shot At Glory. It's the kind of song that makes you believe you can take on the world and win.

The only down side? Well, at times you do perhaps wish they'ed put something a bit more ballady in there just so you could catch your breath. But that's a small point. There are other Priest albums that I would personally rank higher but that's probably because I got into them in the 70's and those albums mean a lot to me but Painkiller is a fantastic record and sadly would be the last with Rob Halford for 13 years.

If you love metal and don't own this album; please, please, please do yourself a favour and buy it.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 1 Mar 2002
Format: Audio CD
When I first heard `Painkiller` , I was totally blown away by the sheer heaviness . As a longtime fan of Priest , I expected extreme metal but this was pushing the envelope even further than before . This would be their most genre defining album since `British Steel` . It was the opening and title track of the album that set a pace that never lets up . Even today it sounds stunningly contemporary and fresh . Elsewhere songs like `Hell patrol` and `One shot at glory` send shivers up the spine such is the dramatic urgency of the delivery and production . Check out the atmospheric `Nightcrawler` and `Touch of evil` if you want to hear a band at the peak of their creative powers . Sadly , `Painkiller` would be the last album to feature vocalist Rob Halford , who left two years later . Rumours of a reunion still persist but this album will stand as a testimony to the power of the Priest . Behold!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By strangeaeon on 25 May 2005
Format: Audio CD
Listening to this 15 years after i first got the album, and it sounds as strong as ever. In my opinion the best Priest album since the late 70s at least, opening with the powerful, fast Painkiller and keeping the quality throughout with outstanding tracks such as All Guns, Night Crawler and Touch of Evil. You can really see the influence on later bands such as Arch Enemy here as well as the likes of Megadeth etc. This is JP at their dynamic peak.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By E. Vernia on 15 Mar 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The best drums intro solo ever.
Ever ever.
You need to have it in your collection, it's a must have.
No excuse.
You need this CD, seriously.
:)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By O-mindcrime on 21 Nov 2011
Format: Audio CD
Ram it Down was a terrible album. Tired and lacking in inspiration, it seemed to signal a band in terminal decline, unsure of their footing in a changed musical landscape. Thrash was on the ascendancy and the new kids on the block, like Slayer and Metallica, had the new art form nailed. It really was do or die for the Priest. And their response was to release 'Painkiller'.

To say 'Painkiller' turned up everything to '11' would be an understatement. Injected with the technical powerhouse of Scott Travis on drums, the results are simply staggering. The bludgeoning title track 'Painkiller' heads the assault from the off. This is a massive two fingers to all the doubters - it says, 'look, we can play loud, we can play fast, we can scream in a pitch that only dogs can hear, we can sing about a mythical man with paracetemol super powers and we don't care'. Obviously this would all be laughable if it wasn't any good - but it is good, in fact it's superb. Track after track on (what was) side 1 assails and pummels the listener into submission, from the equally daft and brilliant `Hell Patrol' (not a song about the front line dangers in Afghanistan, but a song about a patrol in Hell, I think), 'All Guns Blazing' and 'Metal Metaldown' ( a grown up version of the lamentable 'Hard as Iron' from RID). Side 2 heralds a slower, more melodic pace, with the excellent punchy single 'Touch Of Evil' and album closer; 'One Shot at Glory'. This is traditional, high quality, classic Priest fare in the vein of say Screaming or Steel - heavy, yet still melodic. The highlight of what was side 2 is undeniably the massively riff laden 'Between The Hammer and The Anvil', where Rob gives it his absolute all in the vocal department.
Read more ›
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