Buy Used
£2.56
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Oxford World's Classics: The Picture of Dorian Gray Paperback – 5 Mar 1998


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, 5 Mar 1998
£18.27 £0.01


Product details

  • Paperback: 219 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks; New edition edition (5 Mar. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0192833650
  • ISBN-13: 978-0192833655
  • Product Dimensions: 12.4 x 1.3 x 18.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,088,303 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

"Isobel Murray's gifted editing makes this easily the finest edition available."--Dr. A.G. Hunter, Curry College"Very helpful editor's introduction and footnote. This was, for most students, the first exposure to a scholarly edition. It went over very well."--Thomas E. Blair, Chabot College"I've been using the Penguin Modern Classics version which lacks an introduction, chronology, and notes. Yours is more complete."--Robert O'Connor, North Dakota State University"Best quality at the lowest cost, excellent for my introduction to Literature course--students of all ages and backgrounds react strongly and positively to this unique book."--Paul Pellikka, The Univ. of Texas"A fine edition which would work quite well in an English Lit. survey, especially one in the waning years of the twentieth century, given this novel's focus."--Laura Dabundo, Kennesaw State College"Superbly annotated and excellent for introducing students to the wealth of critical and secondary sources available to the Victorian scholar."--Dr. Jonathan F. Alexander, University of Southern Colorado"Another useful addition to the series."--John Wilson, Dakota Wesleyan University"Just what I need to supplement reading in [my] course. Will use...as a text."--S.I. Bellman, Cal Poly Pomona

About the Author

Joseph Bristow is editor of the Oxford English Texts edition of The Picture of Dorian Gray, The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Poetry and Olive Schreiner's African Farm for OWC. He is the author of The Fin-de-Siecle Poem: English Culture and the 1890s (Ohio UP, 2005)." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
THE studio was filled with the rich odour of roses, and when the light summer wind stirred amidst the trees of the garden there came through the open door the heavy scent of the lilac, or the more delicate perfume of the pink-flowering thorn. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Peter Moss on 17 May 2006
Format: Paperback
Firstly, why do people reiterate the plots in reviews? We already have a synopsis from Amazon we don't need another twelve dozen.

This book is wonderful and is so embedded in modern culture it has become elevated to the highest accolades in art by becoming a modern fable (for those who argue that it is the highest: argue with Tolstoy - not me). This is probably why people find it predictable, unsurprising or not as delightful as they thought. There are very few people ignorant of this story - even if they never read it of heard the name of Dorian Grey - as the fabric of the tale is woven into modern western thinking as tightly as that of Plato's or Aristotle's.

What is wonderful about this book is how Wilde has taken a very simple plot which would sit wonderfully in a children's novel and then developed it and deepened it with such complex issues, moral puzzles and twists on society, politics, ethics, religion, art, culture and virtually every other non-cognitive pursuit known to the pre-industrialized world that there is enough material for the greatest of philosophical thinkers to pursue. The novel truly transcends a multitude of intellectual and cultural levels while all the time being beautifully simple and to the point.

Wilde's control of the reader's moral thinking to the point were characters who are loved are despised pages later is nothing short of incredible. By the climax of the novel we are terrified in a way that no horror film can do - because when Wilde builds up to expose to final extent of Grey's soul does he threaten to expose some of our own?

How many novels can do all this: and in such a short book? Maybe Dickens has come close but Wilde achieves it with almost perfection (my only criticism is Wilde's self indulgence in the 'transformation' chapter).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
I have read this twice before but have just read it in conjunction with the recently published uncensored version edited by Nicholas Frankel.

The latter has 13 chapters whereas the former had twenty. Did Murray add chapters to soften the impact or to explain to readers some extra background?

Murray’s chapter 3 has Henry visiting Uncle George to find out about Gray’s family background.

Her chapter 5 has Sybil Vane telling her mother that she has become engaged. Her brother, James, is suspicious.

In chapter 15, Dorian goes to a party of Lady Narborough’s and people notice that5 he is ‘out of sorts’.

Chapter 16 is his taxi ride to an opium den where he meedsAdrian Singleton and, later, James Vane, who remarks that he hasn’t changed in eighteen years.

In chapter 17, Dorian talks to the Duchess of Monmouth.

In chapter 18 he tried to save a hare from being shot but James Vane is shot dead in this hunt.

Chapters 19 and 20 expand the other versions’s chapter 13
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Martin Isaac on 28 Feb. 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is that rare thing - a book that is genuinely fun to read and a page-turner, as well as being "proper" literature with strong moral messages on subjects such as original sin. The narrative is peppered with many of Wilde's famous epigrams, which mean it is rarely less than lively; and for a Londoner like me the glimpses of London past are also very interesting. There is also the added fascination (for anyone who has the faintest knowledge of Wilde's life) of drawing the obvious parallels between the art and the artist.
It does have its flaws. Though the epigrams are fun, sometimes dialogue seems contrived simply so Wilde can express as many as possible in one scene. There is also a subplot which Wilde added subsequently to the first publication, which I feel is weakly written and melodramatic in comparison with the original main text.
However these are minor complaints and I would heartily recommend this to anybody, especially someone looking for a "way in" to serious literature.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
I love this book and it is definitely one of my favourites. It's Wilde's only published novel and is written with pure class. This also offers an intelligent foray into the depths of human action and its consequences.

It's a story about the main protagonist's descent into a world of hedonism, while his picture, which is hidden away, grows more hideous with every amoral judgement. Concerning its main themes of morality and personal judgment it's just as relevant today as it was when it was written.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Look for similar items by category


Feedback