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Oxford Handbook of Music Psychology (Oxford Library of Psychology) [Kindle Edition]

Susan Hallam , Ian Cross , Michael Thaut
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Book Description

The field of Music Psychology has grown dramatically in the past 20 years, to emerge from being just a minor topic to one of mainstream interest within the brain sciences. However, until now, there has been no comprehensive reference text in the field.
The Oxford Handbook of Music Psychology is a landmark text providing, for the first time ever, a comprehensive overview of the latest developments in this fast-growing area of research. With contributions from over fifty experts in the field, the range and depth of coverage is unequalled. All the chapters combine a solid review of the relevant literature with well-reasoned arguments and robust discussions of the major findings, as well as original insights and suggestions for future work.
Written by leading experts, the 52 chapters are divided into 11 sections covering both experimental and theoretical perspectives, each edited by an internationally recognised authority
Ten sections each present chapters that focus on specific areas of music psychology:

- the origins and functions of music
- music perception
- responses to music
- music and the brain
- musical development
- learning musical skills
- musical performance
- composition and improvisation
- the role of music in our everyday lives
- music therapy and conceptual frameworks
In each section, expert authors critically review the literature, highlight current issues, and explore possibilities for the future. The final section examines how in recent years the study of music psychology has broadened to include a range of other scientific disciplines. It considers the way that the research has developed in relation to technological advances, fostering links across the field and providing an overview of the areas where the field needs further development in the future.
The Oxford Handbook of Music Psychology will be the essential reference text for students and researchers across psychology and neuroscience.

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Review

The Oxford Handbook of Music Psychology is broad in conception, clear in purpose, thorough in coverage of all relevant areas, and excellent in style and presentation...[it] is to be recommended without hesitation. (Classical Net Review)

About the Author

Susan Hallam is Professor of Education at the Institute of Education, University of London and currently Dean of the Faculty of Policy and Society. She pursued careers as both a professional musician and a music educator before completing her psychology studies and becoming an academic in 1991 in the department of Educational Psychology at the Institute. Her research interests include disaffection from school, ability grouping and homework and issues relating to learning in music, practising, performing, musical ability, musical understanding and the effects of music on behaviour and studying. She is past editor of Psychology of Music, Psychology of Education Review and Learning Matters. She has twice been Chair of the Education Section of the British Psychological Society, and is currently treasurer of the British Educational Research Association, an auditor for the Quality Assurance Agency and an Academician of the Learned Societies for the Social Sciences

Ian Cross teaches at the University of Cambridge where he is Reader in Music & Science, Director of the Centre for Music & Science and a Fellow of Wolfson College. He has published widely in the field of music cognition. His principal research focus at present is on music as a biocultural phenomenon, involving collaboration with psychologists, anthropologists, archaeologists and computational neuroscientists. His research explores the biological and cultural bases for human musicality, in particular, the mechanisms underlying the capacity for achievement and maintenance of inter-individual synchrony of behaviour, those underlying the experience of meaning in engagement with music, and those involved in the cognition and perception of multi-levelled structure in both music and language.

Michael H Thaut received his masters and PhD in music from Michigan State University. He is also a graduate of the Mozarteum Music Conservatory in Salzburg/Austria. At Colorado State University he is a Professor of Music and a Professor of Neuroscience and serves as Executive Director of the School of the Arts and Chairman of the Dept of Music, Theater, and Dance. He has also directed the Center for Biomedical Research in Music for 12 years. Dr Thaut's internationally recognized research focuses on brain function in music, especially time information processing in the brain related to rhythmicity and biomedical applications of music to neurologic rehabilitation of cognitive and motor function. He has received both the National Research Award and the National Service Award from the American Music Therapy Association. He is an elected member of the World Academy of Multidisciplinary Neurotraumatology and in 2007 he was elected President of the International Society for Clinical Neuromusicology.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 5174 KB
  • Print Length: 600 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford; 1 edition (4 Dec. 2008)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00634NZPY
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
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  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #500,055 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Useful overview 22 Nov. 2010
By RJH
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I'm a postgraduate psychology student who also has a doctorate in musicology, and have found this book invaluable as a starting point for exploring current music psychology. The book is an overview, with a number of leading music pyschologists contributing: its breadth means that there simply isn't the space to go into any great depth, but there are plenty of references and pointers for follow-up reading. It is dry and academic in parts and there are a lot of assumptions about the reader's existing knowledge, which is slightly problematic for an area that attracts attention from a number of academic disciplines (I wonder how many readers are as au fait with a neapolitan 6th as a P600). However, for someone at 3rd year undergraduate level or above wanting an introduction to the many different areas of music psychology, I don't believe there is anything comparable.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars For whom is this volume? 25 Aug. 2010
By Mewsyke
Format:Hardcover
As a professional psychologist and keen semi-professional graduate-musician, I was really excited about this recent publication, and chose it over the Diane Deutsch (1989) volume. I was soon to be disappointed.
Perhaps a better title for this book would have been "..... Handbook of the Cognitive-Neurological Psychology of Music", for that is what this collection of articles is about. Not all psychology is just about brain-body functioning. Even as a practising child psychologist, I found this book a very hard read. While the book is undoubtedly authoritative, I feel it fails on two particular counts: its very dry academic language, which tends to lose the reader in such an overview tome, and its superficiality when discussing very complex concepts or constructs - such as the phylogeny and ontogeny of music at the prenatal stages, as but one such example amongst many. Another area of failure is its vain attempt to explain music psychology as a social psychological phenomenon. The language is altogether inappropriate, for to explain social phenomena one should use socially communicative language.
I feel the tome lacks a clear direction except to propagate clinical/cognitive literature that explains "within-person" functioning. So, if you are interested in how music influences relationships, group dynamics and identities, purchasing behaviour, work behaviour, learning (eg the oft-quoted but recently challenged "Mozart Effect"), healing/health promotion, "flow effect", "peak experience" and other such phenomenologies (ie music psychology in social context), then this volume is definitely not for you. If you are a psychology graduate who may be interested more in the clinical-cognitive-psycho-neurobiological functioning of human beings, then this would be a good introduction for you.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Good 4 Mar. 2014
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The book is a little dated but otherwise excellent.
this is for music or music psycholofy students and possibly academics.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Fair content... horrible value. 16 Oct. 2009
By Joseph S. O'brian - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I bought this book when it was released in February 2009 with great anticipation. After reading "The Social Psychology of Music" by Hargreaves & North, I couldn't wait to start another music psychology text by esteemed authors. Right away though, I noticed the cheapness of the book. Every aspect, from the warping hardcover to the small, double column text, demonstrated the publishing companies capacity for cutting corners and subsidizing production costs. Personally, when I pay over one hundred dollars for a book, regardless of when it was released, I expect it to be of better quality. The other issue with this book pertains to the studies involved in the text. Regardless of the book being one of the most recently published texts on music psychology, most of the studies--at least in the first one hundred pages--were not even from this century. I understand that some studies from the later half of the 20th century will remain landmark studies for years to come, but is asking for a few words about what and where music psychology is going today really so much to ask for? I think not. If you're new to the field of music psychology as I was, do yourself a favor: spend the money on more (but less expensive) books released over the last two decades. Honestly, the content of this book brings nothing new to the table besides a few minute cases, usually supporting older research.
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A very academic overview, mixed content, some great, some not 20 Dec. 2009
By Aaron Wolf - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
This is written by a very large number of authors and edited by a number of editors. A few chapters are almost unreadable and useless. Some chapters are great. Most are good and very informative, although the reading isn't exactly fun. Overall, it is probably the best broad view of the entire scope of music psychology leading up through today. The content could have been more integrated, but it is still a valuable collection. I would not recommend it to casual readers. The chapters on pitch perception and memory are excellent. The chapters on practicing are good. It all adds up to a mixed value. I recommend getting it from the library instead of buying a copy unless you're a serious academic in the field (in which case you don't need my review here).
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent reading! 18 Sept. 2014
By Pedro Santos - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Excellent reading, specially the Musical Time Article!
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