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Owl at Home (I Can Read Books: Level 2) Paperback – 1 Jan 1900


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Paperback, 1 Jan 1900
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Product details

  • Paperback: 64 pages
  • Publisher: HarperTrophy (1 Jan. 1900)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0064440346
  • ISBN-13: 978-0064440349
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 0.5 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 568,079 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Owl was at home. Read the first page
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ms. E. H. Street on 24 Aug. 2006
Format: Paperback
I had this book read to me as a child and I think I remember finding it quite eerie and compelling at the same time. The pictures as well as the stories have a very sad edge to them, but for some reason they are emminently readable and quite enjoyable. I have read them to my class of Year 2 children and they also enjoyed the strange stories and provoked some insteresting discussions about being lonely and about being sad.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Sara Lynn Smith on 19 Dec. 2002
Format: Paperback
As a small child, this book was taken out from the library with what must have been wearisome regularity for my parents. As my mother neared the end of her life I decided to purchase a copy on amazon to share with her, and found the stories as captivating and sweet as I did in my youth. Lobel's Frog and Toad stories may be more popular, but the Owl stories are particularly touching and particularly well illustrated. They convey values without being moralising and display a tenderness that is timeless and wonderful.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mabel Jane on 13 Sept. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Any fans of Arnold Lobel's inimitable Frog and Toad stories are sure to love these stories about Owl. Lobel's quirkily original ideas are written in a simple but captivating style, perfectly illustrated with his beautiful drawings. As well as Owl at Home and his Frog and Toad stories, I would also highly recommend Lobel's Mouse Tales and Mouse Soup. I wish I'd had these books when I was learning to read!
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By T.Davies on 24 Aug. 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Arnold Lobels stories about Owl are thought provoking, intelligent and written with compassion and humour. In appearance Owl resembles an old man. His preoccupations are those of the elderly and the small child.

Tear- Water Tea is a contemplative story where Owl thinks about sad things, including pencils that are too short to use and mornings nobody saw because everybody was sleeping.
As he reflects on these his tears fill the kettle, which he then boils and makes tea.

In The Guest, Winter knocks at the door and Owl invites Winter in. They enjoy an evening together and when Winter leaves Owl experiences what all of us feel when an interesting and stimulating guest has left, tired, happy and relieved to have a bit of peace.

A wonderful read.
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