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Ovid: Fasti (Loeb Classical Library): Bks. I-VI [Hardcover]

Publius Ovidius Naso , James George Frazer
1.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
Price: £16.95 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Book Description

1 July 1989
Ovid's Fasti, begun in or soon after AD I, was to have celebrated the calendar and associated legends of the Roman year, but probably had reached no further than June before his exile in AD 8. Book IV, the book of April, honours the festivals of Venus, Cybele, Ceres and their cult, as well as the traditional date of the foundation of Rome and many religious and civic anniversaries. Elaine Fantham accompanies her commentary with a revised text and a deliberately extended introduction. Besides including surveys of language, style, versification and textual transmission, the introduction looks at the shifting generic traditions of Greek and Roman elegy, and situates Ovid's composite poem in its Augustan literary and historical context.

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Ovid: Fasti (Loeb Classical Library): Bks. I-VI + Tristia: Vol 6 (Loeb Classical Library) + Heroides, Amores (Loeb Classical Library): 001
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 494 pages
  • Publisher: Loeb; 2nd edition (1 July 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0674992792
  • ISBN-13: 978-0674992795
  • Product Dimensions: 16.9 x 11.4 x 2.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 1.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 598,947 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

' … a breakthrough in the study of classics … it will secure a place in every undergraduate curriculum of Roman history.' Bryn Mawr Classical Review --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

Book Description

Book IV of the Fasti, Ovid's celebration of the Roman calendar and its associated legends, is the book of April and honours the festivals of Venus, Cybele, Ceres, and their cults, as well as the traditional date of the foundation of Rome and many religious and civic anniversaries. Elaine Fantham accompanies her commentary with a revised text and a deliberately extended introduction. Besides including surveys of language, style, versification and textual transmission, the introduction looks at the shifting generic traditions of Greek and Roman elegy, and situates Ovid's composite poem in its Augustan literary and historical context. --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Appalled. 24 Jan 2014
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
The kindle version was a bad scan, with flipped pages and untranslated Latin.
I spent over five pounds on this. I expected better from Amazon.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Ovid's Fasti for kindle: Not what it seems. 23 Sep 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This is a review of the kindle edition of Ovid's Fasti, which I encountered when looking for the translation by Tony Boyle published by Penguin classics. I paid £5.21 for it, but it turned out to be a scan of a nineteenth century school text, not only in Latin, but also bowdlerised for school boys. Don't buy the kindle version. Half the text is not there.
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Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  9 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very well done! 23 Jan 2008
By M. Brown - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This Penguin edition is very well done and preserves the meaning of the Latin without distorting or mangling it. The book also contains copious and well-researched notes to explain the numerous festivals, minor dieties, and individuals that Ovid mentions. The Fasti is invaluable as a glimpse of Roman culture, not only as a product of the Etruscan influences, but those of the other Italic peoples and the Greeks as well. Ovid skillfully adapts a plethora of "sacred rites unearthed from ancient annals" (1.7-8). What those "sacred annals" contained, we don't know for sure, but many of Ovid's stories included in the poem allude to and are corroborated by the works of Hesiod, Livy, Catullus, Lucretius, Vergil, and others. Ovid however puts his "slant" on things and makes associations that some argue are erroneous. Perhaps. But, taken as a whole, the Fasti is a great poem to also put Roman history into perspective. Ovid again and again stresses Rome's humble beginnings and it's current (for him) preeminence in the world -- "imperium sine fine."

A very well done translation of an amazing work that is not widely read in schools.
14 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Counting the days, at "the end of the world"... 20 Jan 2004
By "acominatus" - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
This one volume work in the Loeb Classical Series (# 253) is
Ovid's remarkable combining of poetry, myth, astrology,
astronomy, and commentary on Rome.
Apparently the work was written, or completed, while
Ovid was in exile in what is today Romania (in the
ancient city of Tomis), having been sent there by the
Emperor Augustus.
Ovid's life there must have been misery, anguish, and
hardship (how different from the famous poet all
Rome had talked about before his fall!). The poems
about that exile, along with letters which he sent back
to Rome, can be found in Loeb Classical volume, # 151,
-Tristia, Ex Ponto- (ISBN: 0674991672).
This present volume "is a poetical treatise on the
Roman calendar, which it discusses in chronological
order, beginning with the first day of January and
ending with the last day of June, where it stops
abruptly." (Introduction.) Ovid had intended to
write 12 parts to the work, but we only have the
first six. The author of the Introduction makes
some scholarly speculations about what happened to
the other six parts, which are very interesting.
This Loeb version is translated by James G. Frazer,
who himself had orginally published a 5-volume edition
of the -Fasti-, but trimmed a bit of his scholarly
commentary in order to produce this one-volume edition
for the Loeb series. Frazer (1854 - 1941) was a
British anthropologist, folklorist, and classical
scholar; his 12 volume opus, -The Golden Bough-,
is a world-famous work on comparative ancient religions,
myth, and cultural rites.
Ovid, himself, was exremely interested not only
in poetry, but in myth and cultural rites as well. That
is clearly evidenced in the -Fasti-. Here is an example
of the combining of poetry, with myth, and astrology/
astronomy from March 5: "When from her saffron cheeks
Tithonous' spouse shall have begun to shed the dew /
at the time of the fifth morn, the constellation,
whether it be the Bear-ward or the sluggard Bootes,
will have sunk and will escape thy sight. But not
so will the Grape-gatherer escape thee." There is
more to the quote which expands on the myth of the
origin of the constellation. There are excellent
notes to explain allusions, as well as a scholarly
Introduction to the volume.
Though Ovid was trying to find some way to gain
either commutation or release from his exile, he was
not successful (either under Augustus or his successor,
the Emperor Tiberius). Still, though seeking clemency,
Ovid nonetheless takes satiric swipes at Rome's
losing of ancient values. Ovid died in exile and
was buried in Tomis. "Sic transit gloria mundi."
-- Robert Kilgore.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Read "Metamorphoses," "Amores" first 17 Mar 2014
By buddhawannabe - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
People have been talking up "Fasti" lately but it's really a poem you read AFTER you read Ovid's one great long poem, "Metamorphoses," and his one great collection of short poems, "Amores." (The "Art of Love" is a cute poem, and certainly gives you a vivid picture of what it was like to be a 'player' in Imperial Rome, but as for enduring literary quality, let's get real.) The Loeb edition is one of the weirder specimens in the LCL format. The great historian of religion, Frazer (of "The Golden Bough") began the Loeb edition, but got so interested in it he ended up doing a four-volume study of the poem, instead. The Loeb edition itself is just a chopped-down fragment of that larger project. So get a prose translation like the Oxford (see my review) to use with this handy and inexpensive edition of the Latin, if you want to read EVERYTHING Ovid wrote . . . and why not, he's a great, great poet!
3.0 out of 5 stars PROBLEMS WITH KINDLE EDITION, NOT WITH BOOK 19 April 2013
By Michael - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
There are supposed to be several maps at the beginning of this book, and they do show up on Kindle for Mac, but they do not on the iPad. The publishers/Amazon need to provide the correct text.
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic translation with useful comments 9 Nov 2011
By Renate Prancane - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is excellent book and the English translation is perfectly done. Comments in the end are really useful and helps to understand the poem better. In beginning there are maps of Ancient Rome which helps to travel with the text through the Ancient Rome. I am more than satisfied with this purchase.
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