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Overthrow: 10 Ways to Tell a Challenger Story Hardcover – 1 Jun 2012


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 70 pages
  • Publisher: PHD (1 Jun. 2012)
  • ISBN-10: 0956972810
  • ISBN-13: 978-0956972811
  • Product Dimensions: 18 x 12.6 x 1.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 255,798 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Adam Morgan is the author of Eating The Big Fish: How Challenger Brands Can Compete Against Brand Leaders, the international best seller that introduced the concept of challenger brands to the world of marketing.

His ideas have been widely cited as a key influence by a new generation of successful entrepreneurs and business leaders around the world.

He is founder of eatbigfish, a renowned marketing consultancy that works with clients to develop their own breakthrough strategies, from Helsinki to Hanoi.

Product Description

Anyone interested in challengers is interested in compression: how do you make a story utterly compelling in a very short space of time? And one of the reasons that the concept of the 'challenger brand' has caught on, you might argue, is that it itself does just that: within just two words you surely have all the ingredients of an engaging story - conflict, a protagonist and an adversary, an anticipation of a future event whose outcome is uncertain, the new order looking to overthrow the establishment. It's all there. Except that it isn't. Not really. Because for all that people talk about challenger brands more than they ever did, all too often it is a clichéd and superficial view that persists in what that challenger narrative actually is: either 'little brand explicitly calling out big brand' (think Avis or Ryanair) or 'turn every category rule on its head' (think the young Red Bull or Grameen Bank). But if we look at a new generation of challengers from the last ten years, do they really all fall into one of those two different approaches? Al Jazeera, for example, or Airbnb. Audi, kulula, Zappos, and One Laptop Per Child - there's a range of challenger narratives out there, each being powerfully told. But they're not as simplistic as 'David vs Goliath'. It's time to learn from this new challenger generation, and put on the table a more evolved model of what it means to be a challenger. So what if we were to group all the different challengers from the last ten years into the ten most common challenger approaches they represent? What if we were to identify for each of them what, not whom, they were challenging, and how they were doing it? What if we interviewed ten shining examples to get an insight on what it really meant to live in that narrative? What if we could unpack the media implications for each? Good idea, we thought. Let's do it.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was looking for a quick overview of challenger brand thinking. For me this book fell a little short of the mark in that respect
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Format: Hardcover
Another wonderful book from the masters of challenger brands. I used their 10 types of challenger brand to help the team at 48 (a challenger brand) really articulate what they are and are not, and the resourcing implications of this. It is a short book, with good examples. You'll enjoy.
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Format: Hardcover
Amazing book! Packed with practical knowledge in a very concise form which is ready to use. Definitely one of the best precessional books on marketing communications I have recently read! Highly recommended.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
good but... 22 Aug. 2012
By Ewan Adams - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Good discussion around how challenger brands are not a homogeneous group. Each of the 10 challenger types make complete sense and the examples are clear and compelling. I read this in 30 minutes. Might have taken me longer if half of the book had actually been formatted to fit the kindle. In summary - the first half was good, no idea about the second half because it doesn't work on the kindle - buy the hard copy
Challengers Unite! 14 Jun. 2013
By Latoya Brown - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I received this book at the DIAsiaTourism conference in Thailand. I'm glad to have received this gem and gift of words.

Through utilizing this book a dynamic team can be created. The personality test was good and pinned my personality precisely. The challenger generation has already arrived and this book explains it best.
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