Outgrowing the Earth and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading Outgrowing the Earth on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Outgrowing the Earth: The Food Security Challenge in an Age of Falling Water Tables and Rising Temperatures [Hardcover]

Lester R. Brown
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
RRP: 25.00
Price: 23.89 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: 1.11 (4%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Tuesday, 22 April? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition 20.31  
Hardcover 23.89  
Paperback --  
Amazon.co.uk Trade-In Store
Did you know you can use your mobile to trade in your unwanted books for an Amazon.co.uk Gift Card to spend on the things you want? Visit the Books Trade-In Store for more details or check out the Trade-In Amazon Mobile App Guidelines on how to trade in using a smartphone. Learn more.

Book Description

3 Feb 2005
Historically, food security was the responsibility of ministries of agriculture but today that has changed: decisions made in ministries of energy may instead have the greatest effect on the food situation. Recent research reporting that a one degree Celsius rise in temperature can reduce grain yields by 10 per cent means that energy policy is now directly affecting crop production. Agriculture is a water-intensive activity and, while public attention has focused on oil depletion, it is aquifer depletion that poses the more serious threat. There are substitutes for oil, but none for water and the link between our fossil fuel addiction, climate change and food security is now clear. While population growth has slowed over the past three decades, we are still adding 76 million people per year. In a world where the historical rise in land productivity has slowed by half since 1990, eradicating hunger may depend as much on family planners as on farmers. The bottom line is that future food security depends not only on efforts within agriculture but also on energy policies that stabilize climate, a worldwide effort to raise water productivity, the evolution of land-efficient transport systems, and population policies that seek a humane balance between population and food. Outgrowing the Earth advances our thinking on food security issues that the world will be wrestling with for years to come.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge (3 Feb 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0387955445
  • ISBN-13: 978-0387955445
  • ASIN: 1844071855
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,344,656 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'The book proposes that the challenge of feeding the world is at least as much about energy, water, climate and population. This view is no more than we should expect from Lester Brown, whose forte, eloquently expressed in the course of writing dozens of books over the past four decades, is to emphasise the links that connect all our development sectors, sometimes obviously, sometimes covertly, often crucially.' Times Higher Education Supplement' Lester Brown advances our thinking on the food-security issues that the world will be wrestling with for years to come.' Sustain 'The book should be bought just to demonstrate how good arguments are put together.' Paul Ganderton '[I]t will be an instant classic.' E. O. Wilson Praise for Eco-Economy '[A] lucid and wide-ranging examination of how we can save our forests, grow rich on power generated from wind and sun, halt global warming and heal the ozone layer.' New Scientist 'Highly interesting.' Helmut Schmidt, former Chancellor of Germany '[A] marvellous and inspiring book!' B�rge Brende, Minister of Environment, Norway 'The book should be bought just to demonstrate how good arguments are put together.' Paul Ganderton Praise for the Author 'Widely respected environmental political thinker Lester Brown ... writes powerfully and accessibly, and is eminently readable.' Times Higher Education Supplement

About the Author

Lester R. Brown is President of Earth Policy Institute, and has been described as 'one of the world's most influential thinkers' by The Washington Post. He is widely known as the Founder and former President of the Worldwatch Institute, whose Board he now chairs. He launched the influential State of the World reports, which are now published in over 30 languages. Brown has been honoured with numerous prizes, including the MacArthur 'Genius' Fellowship, the United Nations Environment Prize, and Japan's Blue Planet Prize. He lives in Washington, DC.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.8 out of 5 stars
4.8 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover
Global warming, floods, energy crisis, I try to keep an eye on what's happening in the world, it's been challenging, and depressing, now it's just got worse! Lester R Brown in Outgrowing The Earth has drawn together a mass of data, and put it in largely readable form, that shows that, for a number of reasons, we are headed for widespread famines in years to come, the thing that he didn't, in my opinion, properly raise though is that the world's agriculture is massively oil dependent for production and distribution, and when you add that to the issues of falling water tables, rising populations, and global warming, that he does emphasise, we are really stuffed.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Managing the food supply 12 Aug 2009
By Dr. H. A. Jones TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
Outgrowing the Earth: The food security challenge in an age of falling water tables and rising temperatures by Lester R. Brown, W.W. Norton, New York, 2004, 256 ff.

Managing the food supply
By Howard A. Jones

Warnings about potential environmental disaster of one kind or another abound today. Yet there are many who are still in denial - out of a sense of helplessness; or because they do not want to face an unpalatable truth and make changes to their extravagant life-style; or perhaps because their distorted religious world-view leads them to believe that God or Gaia will sort it out whatever we do.

Well, here is a book that, despite being five years old now (2009), is even more relevant today than it was at the time of publication, because the challenges that Brown highlights here have only become more serious in the intervening period. There are some economists, including the author, who believe that shortages of land and clean air to breathe and usable water are even more significant and dangerous to human survival than lack of oil. At the root of the problem - people. There are simply far too many people on the planet for Earth's resources to sustain even at present levels. Rising global temperatures are only one of the results of our profligacy, not a cause of the problems: overpopulation is our greatest hazard.

In this book, Brown uses examples from overfishing in Canada and Peru, failure of wheat harvests in China and Russia, and the drying up of rivers used for irrigation in India to illustrate the fact that the problems are serious and global. And he should know, as the president of the Earth Policy Institute in Washington D.C.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
By calmly
Format:Paperback
I'm not a scientist. I recently became interested, however, in the issue of the sustainability of the human race. Much of my concern has been due to political uncertainties, but I also wondered about some fundamental environmental issues.

Since I have not read much in the field of environmentalism, I can not say for certain how solid Brown's facts are, but it does appear he presents many claims, in this book and in the web site that the book refers to, which would enable his claims (and priorities) to be tested. It would be unusual for one person to have everything right on such complex issues but if Brown has presented what he sees clearly and verifiably, that seems a great help to us all. It seems a big help to me personally.

Brown does not focus on catastrophe in this relatlively subdued 2005 book: it is clearly instead stated many times to be about food security. He is concerned, but doesn't speculate, as to how polticians and nations will react if the food security challenge is not met. Beyong warming, which dominates the news, Brown raises concerns about issues I was less familar with such as the water tables.

I definitely plan now to read Brown's "Plan B 2.0: Rescuing a Planet Under Stress and a Civilization in Trouble" which does sound more alarmist. Even if scientists ran the world, it seems we might be in grave danger but with our current set of politicians, how can we feel confident? This may be a time when every good world citizen sets aside national boundaries and steps forward to seek a solution to the earth's woes for the sake of the future of our descendants.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By Jezza
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Kind of made more convincing by the things that Brown puts his trust in - especially aquaculture in China. Is that unsustainable or what? Having visited an aquaculture facility (albeit in Israel, not China) it seems to me to terribly energy- and water-intensive.

But Brown's analysis of the coming food crisis is spot on, and of late the news seems to be bearing it all out.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars  8 reviews
28 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars wake up call 27 Feb 2005
By wilson harris - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
this is an excellent and well written overview of the many challenges facing the world as it faces increasing demands for food and decreasing food supplies due to factors such as urbanization, global warming, increased population, water shortages. the author presents the issues in a factual and articulate manner without seeking to be too alarmist or anti-business. the book is short on rhetoric but full of relevant data from which the reader can form his/her own conclusions. it makes you think about food in an entirely new perpsective.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating Overview of the Food Security Challenge 5 Dec 2008
By Daniel Lobo - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Quite the volume to approach the essential and much misunderstood issue of food security. Critical reading to develop an argument for policy chance and avoid, or lessen, the crisis. The book is dated 2004 and like it suggests there is a strong feeling to expand and update figures and analysis in the face of recent developments. Much of that update points to the Earth Policy Institute where Lester Brown is President, but there is much from him, and plenty other authors to add to the debate.

While one is left with little doubt about the severity of the demands on the earth's capacity, something is lacking by way of helping to make a strong public argument, one that will raise actual social awareness. But that is not so much a flaw of the book as a challenge of a topic that for its importance seems to be placed on the periphery of public concern.

On a personal planning note, I am particularly intrigued by the validity of the argument offered by food security regarding urban density. Urban density has been typically misconstrued as an ideological necessity, either romanticizing the idea of the city to support it, or defending individual liberty against central planning to defend sprawl. Here not only the environmental argument is strengthen, but a solid line of thinking emerges since sprawl is an essential cause of the decrease of croplands in particular by the paving for roads, highways, parking lots and its related lifestyle. Density would be a remedy to that, although that would be far from solving on its own the huge sustainability challenges that urbanization faces.
5.0 out of 5 stars Managing the food supply 29 Jun 2012
By Dr. H. A. Jones - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Outgrowing the Earth: The food security challenge in an age of falling water tables and rising temperatures by Lester R. Brown, W.W. Norton, New York, 2004, 256 ff.

Warnings about potential environmental disaster of one kind or another abound today. Yet there are many who are still in denial - out of a sense of helplessness; or because they do not want to face an unpalatable truth and make changes to their extravagant life-style; or perhaps because their distorted religious world-view leads them to believe that God or Gaia will sort it out whatever we do.

Well, here is a book that, despite being five years old now (2009), is even more relevant today than it was at the time of publication, because the challenges that Brown highlights here have only become more serious in the intervening period. There are some economists, including the author, who believe that shortages of land and clean air to breathe and usable water are even more significant and dangerous to human survival than lack of oil. At the root of the problem we have people. There are simply far too many people on the planet for Earth's resources to sustain even at present levels. Rising global temperatures are only one of the results of our profligacy, not a cause of the problems: overpopulation is our greatest hazard.

In this book, Brown uses examples from overfishing in Canada and Peru, failure of wheat harvests in China and Russia, and the drying up of rivers used for irrigation in India to illustrate the fact that the problems are serious and global. And he should know, as the president of the Earth Policy Institute in Washington D.C. With all the monitoring resources at their disposal they are in a position to gather data on many aspects of our impending environmental catastrophe.

We can read this book as a catalogue of doom, gloom and failure, as it gives ample statistics of where we have gone wrong. But we can also read it as a challenge to join with environmental groups wherever we can to force governments and industry to put human survival before election prospects or short-term profit. Forget the shareholders and fat bonuses for directors - put the people first. This book should be required reading in schools and colleges in the hope of waking people up to what needs to be done if humankind is not to become part of the sixth mass extinction.

The Last Hours of Ancient Sunlight: Revised and Updated: The Fate of the World and What We Can Do Before It's Too Late

Howard Jones is the author of The Tao of Holism
5.0 out of 5 stars Outgrowing The Earth by Lester Brown 11 Aug 2007
By Nicholas B. Robson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Excellent work as all of this author's are. This book should be required reading for all government ministers of all stated globally.
Nick Robson, South Asian Strategic Stability Institute.
4.0 out of 5 stars enlightening review of the upcoming global food crisis 3 Jan 2007
By John G. Curington - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
"Outgrowing the Earth" is another great contribution by Lester Brown. In ten concise chapters the author reviews the relationship between continuing human population growth and the finite land and water resources of the planet. I found the discussion of falling water tables especially interesting and important. I was also glad to see the increasing food needs of China as well as the potential for increasing food production in Brazil were both covered from several angles. There were also extensive endnotes and a decent index, both of which I found useful. In summary, this is another important and well-researched publication for anyone interested in issues of food security in these times of diminishing fuel reserves, rising temperatures, and falling water tables.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews
ARRAY(0xaa1baf9c)

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback