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Out Of The Game Deluxe Edition

60 customer reviews

Price: £9.28 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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£9.28 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 12 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Rufus Wainwright - House of Rufus

Biography

Affectionately referred to by Elton John as “the greatest songwriter on the planet” and praised by The New York Times for his "genuine originality," Rufus Wainwright has established himself as one of the great male vocalists and songwriters of his generation. He is the son of folk singers Loudon Wainwright III and Kate McGarrigle, and brother of Martha Wainwright but ... Read more in Amazon's Rufus Wainwright Store

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Frequently Bought Together

Out Of The Game + Want One + Release the Stars
Price For All Three: £19.45

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Product details

  • Audio CD (23 April 2012)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Deluxe Edition
  • Label: Polydor
  • ASIN: B006ZZANG0
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (60 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 89,008 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Behind The Scenes - Rufus Wainwright

Product Description

Product Description

Out of the Game is Rufus Wainwright's seventh studio album, and was produced by Mark Ronson. Musicians on the album include the Dap Kings, who Ronson used for the groundbreaking Amy Winehouse Back To Black album and his own Record Collection; Wilco's Nels Cline; Nick Zinner of Yeah Yeah Yeahs; Andrew Wyatt from Miike Snow; Sean Lennon and Martha Wainwright. the album features the single "Out of the Game".

BBC Review

Never judge an album by its cover. On the outside at least, everything seems to suggest that this is the Rufus Wainwright we’ve come to know: the strutting peacock in his manor, a pink-jacketed hedonist with cane in hand, blithely inspecting his fingernails. But the truth is elsewhere. Out of the Game, created with go-to producer Mark Ronson, largely dispenses with the lush orchestral backings and sumptuous surrounds of much of his previous work. Instead it’s a record driven by soul grooves, classic American R&B and, more overtly, 70s pop.

There’s certainly much less of the symphonic bombast that occasionally hampered 2007’s Release the Stars. And while it’s much fuller than his last album, 2010’s All Days Are Nights, Out of the Game is very much a master class in restraint. Rather than straining for the big choruses, here Wainwright intones over smooth backings, horns and the gospel harmonies of Brooklyn soul-stirrers The Dap-Kings.

Barbara, a tribute to his publicist and manager, carries the languid feel of Californian MOR, while Jericho is a gorgeous funk ballad, all spongy bass and warm brass. Rashida features a little sax, squally guitar and the kind of piano line served up by Mike Garson on Aladdin Sane, the end result a weightless mix of Bowie and Queen.

Aside from Ronson, Wainwright’s also joined by, amongst others, his sister Martha, Sean Lennon, Wilco guitarist Nels Cline and Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ Nick Zinner. It all makes for some intriguing tangents. Respectable Dive, for instance, finds him settling into a slow country shuffle, some twangy guitar kicking up the dust. Bitter Tears somehow manages to transpose classical chamber music onto nimble 70s disco, the whole thing sounding like an Elizabethan shindig under a giant glitterball.

There’s rumination aplenty too. The baleful acoustic rhythm of Sometimes You Need finds Wainwright in reflective mode, singing of making it through the dark and finding succour in the company of a stranger. Candles is seven-plus minutes of piano-led balladry with hushed chorals and a smattering of accordion that serves as a requiem for his late mother, Kate McGarrigle. Much like Out of the Game as a whole, it’s very special indeed.

--Rob Hughes

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By One more opinion on 26 April 2012
Format: Audio CD
Yup he's back. And still singing all about him.
There's something so self obessedly wonderful about Rufus. All the songs revolve around him, or his family, or his friends. So really it's same old Rufus.
But damn the songs are very good. Echoes of everything here: His past albums, especially Release the Stars and Songs for Lulu (on Montauk) - but also touches of Queen, Beatles, a general 70's pop vibe, all topped off with swirling strings.

There's some great electric guitar here and there. A bit of country - most notable on the title track.

Great phrasing, catchy riffs and tunes. All these tracks would work wonderfully just with solo piano but it's the full band here which really makes things happen. All great throughout - there's almost everything here, including bagpipes! Really I'm not kidding.

Sister Martha (that's his sister not the religious kind) provides her gorgeous vocals on a couple of tracks, along with other family members.

This is very very good. Bravo Rufus - keep it up!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J. M. M. Out on 16 Jun. 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
My first reaction to this new line of Rufus' was: hmm, liked the old Rufus better. Then I caught myself playing the CD over and over again. I had to think of an interview with Ringo Starr in the seventies I once read, in which he was asked what he thought of his estranged pal Paul's new effort 'Venus and Mars'. His first response was 'not great' and then a moment later walking down the street or so he found himself whistling a tune of it over and over again. 'Out of the Game' is a great record. There is undiluted old Rufus here too, 'Montauk', 'Song for you', 'Candles' for example. But he has clearly set out to broaden his appeal, inviting Mark Ronson as producer and going for dance music, music that befits Top 40 Radio. The first three songs 'Out of the Game', 'Jericho' and 'Rashida' is an irresistible, triumphant trio of songs. Philly Soul comes to mind in 'Bitter Tears', 'Welcome to the Ball.' This is Rufus too. He has merely harnassed his talent, directed it differently. I imagine he has seen a club or two in his wilder days, so making dance music is not alien to his core. His talent as a composer and musician is so vast, he can adopt many guises and still be Rufus. And if I suddenly hanker for wall to wall undiluted old Rufus, the composer of pop 'lieder', 'Lulu' has not ceased to exist.
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25 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Miracle on 24 April 2012
Format: Audio CD
Although Rufus Wainwright's prodigious musical and creative gifts have never been in doubt, his studio-recorded output since 2003/4's seminal "Want" albums has been rather disappointing. "Release The Stars" (2007) didn't have many good songs, a fact which the bombastic production did more to highlight than to conceal; while "All Days Are Nights.."(2010) was a brave and challenging work of stripped-back production and lieder-esque songwriting that inspired more admiration than love. In short, the luminescent charm and pop sensibility of Rufus's earlier work was missing from these collections, and it seemed that the legions who longed for "Want Three" would be indefinitely frustrated.

Those legions, I am sure, will now finally feel sated by "Out Of The Game", an album which truly marks a return to form for one of popular music's brightest talents. The songs here are better than excellent, Rufus's vocals have dramatically improved, and there is once more that almost conspiratorial sense of something special going on between performer and listener - a quality we have specifically come to associate with the Montreal Maestro's best work. Further, the production by Mark Ronson is sumptuously flawless, and coats every song with a beautiful metallic sheen that renders each one an exquisite harmonic delight.

Basically, all the cuts included are excellent.

The album kicks off with the title track, a slinky slice of pedestrian country-pop that includes a sneaky lyrical nod to ABBA: "...does your Mama know?...".
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Tommy Opposite on 25 April 2012
Format: Audio CD
Have always looked forward to a new Rufus album and the last couple have tested me slightly.
However, this has to be up there with Want One. A truly brilliant album which sees Rufus back to his peak of
creative songwriting.
The truly haunting Candles and Montauk are real highlights and the excellent lead single Out of the Game deserves
to be a radio staple for the forthcoming months. No doubt it wont be, but this could be the huge commercial breakthrough Rufus so truly deserves.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Glenn on 25 April 2012
Format: Audio CD
Rufus Wainwright's latest release is as pop-lush as he claims ["the most pop album I have made"], and whilst we know the production touch belongs to Mark Ronson, he would appear to have drawn on precursor strokes of lavishness from the likes of Todd Rudgren, Godley and Creme, and on fifth track 'Welcome To The Ball', George Martin with its Beatlesesque use of trumpets and other sundries. It is all very pretty with Wainwright's polished tenor and the whirling choruses that sing hand in hand as they dance down this luxuriant pop boulevard.

It is this production that dominates over songwriting, nothing quite matching the quality of songs from early work on 'Poses', 'Want One' and 'Want Two', but the confession and angst that ignited that creative spark has been lessened by that catalyst's familiarity and, presumably for Wainwright himself as much as family and the public, its acceptance. One of the strongest tracks for me on this album is in many ways the least pretty, 'Montauk', a song written for Wainwright's daughter, and its internal key changes provide upsets to the classic descending melodic line. The lyrics drive this one, and Wainwright's imagining of a future meeting and assessment of the father figure seems to reflect the preoccupations he has had with his own, and perhaps confronting the possible conflicts he now feels as the one dad who plays a piano and the other who wears kimonos. It is a song that has an honest anticipation about its hopes and fears,

'One day you will come to Montauk
And see your dad trying to be evil
One day you will come to Montauk
And see your other dad feeling lonely
Hope that you'll protect him'

and it ends poignantly by appearing to invoke the memory of his mother Kate McGarrigle

'One day years ago in Montauk
Lived a woman, now a shadow
But she does wait for us in the ocean'
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