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Out of Our Heads CD


Price: £9.45 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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Biography

The Rolling Stones were formed in London in April 1962 by Brian Jones (guitar, harmonica), Ian Stewart (piano), Mick Jagger (lead vocals, harmonica, guitar), and Keith Richards (guitar, vocals). Bassist Bill Wyman and drummer Charlie Watts completed the early line-up. R&B and blues cover songs dominated the Rolling Stones' early material, but their repertoire has always included rock ... Read more in Amazon's The Rolling Stones Store

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Out of Our Heads + Aftermath + 12 x 5
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Product details

  • Audio CD (10 Aug. 2006)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Abkco/Decca
  • ASIN: B00006RT4Q
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 25,870 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. She Said Yeah
2. Mercy Mercy
3. Hitch Hike
4. That's How Strong My Love Is
5. Good Times
6. Gotta Get Away
7. Talkin' About You
8. Cry To Me
9. Oh Baby (We Got A Good Thing Goin')
10. Heart Of Stone
11. The Under Assistant West Coast Promotion Man
12. I'm Free

Product Description

BBC Review

By 1965, when the bulk of this album was recorded pop acts of the day were accustomed surfing an alternating tidal wave of hormonal acclaim and establishment distaste. Yet the pop market was a fickle thing with no guarantees about how long there success might last. We look at The Stones, now in their dotage and still managing to scare the horses, and look back on their rise as being inevitable. However, acts like Herman’s Hermits were actually shifting more units than The Stones at the time (they knocked “Satisfaction” off the US number one slot!) and the moral panic surrounding the group meant there was nothing predictable about their longevity at all.

What began to put distance between The Stones and their lightweight package-tour companions was their growing ability to write their own material. Whilst the Jagger and Richards team had penned a few ditties there was nothing that they could really call their own, as the rabble-rousing R&B potboiler “It’s Alright” “The Under Assistant West Coast Promotion Man” and “One More Try” ably demonstrate.

That all changed when they holed up in an LA studio between live dates. “The Last Time” welded together all their experience to date into a glorious cavernous swirl that revolved around one of pop music’s truly great riffs. Recorded in the same session but at the other end of the dynamic spectrum was “Play With Fire,” elegantly articulating the subtle frictions of London’s social classes rubbing shoulders and more besides: grown up social commentary to a harpsichord accompaniment no less!

As was the custom, none of these singles appeared on the original UK pressing of the album, and their presence on this 2002 reissue overshadows this clutch of capable cover versions. What the likes of “Mercy Mercy” and “Good Times”, and “Cry To Me” lack in inspiration, they compensate with admirable perspiration, though Jagger’s cavorting truculence is clearly outgrowing such sedate vehicles as these.

Whilst “Satisfaction” consolidated things, it’s “The Last Time” which represents the peeling back of their vestigial R&B persona, to become something that would be both beautiful and scary. --Sid Smith

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. J. H. Thorn TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 16 Nov. 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The only one of The Stones's first five US albums to share its title with one of the UK releases, 'Out Of Our Heads' nevertheless features just six of the same tracks on both releases. This version is undoubtedly stronger, simply because it features the tracks from their first two big, self-penned hits. 'The Last Time' and 'Satisfaction' are among their finest moments, but the b-sides 'Play With Fire' and 'The Spider And The Fly are also superb. The restrained, dramatic qualities of 'Play With Fire' crept increasingly into their writing, and at first proved valuable, but were perhaps later overused.

From the first two cover tracks, it's clear that the band were a lot more confident and competent at tackling a wide range of material than on their first album. For me, every track is a winner, with the exception of 'Good Times', though that probably has a lot to do with my aversion to Sam Cooke songs. A great CD, which shows that there was a lot more to the early Stones than just a string of number one singles.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Jervis VINE VOICE on 6 April 2007
Format: Audio CD
'Out Of Our Heads' is the final Stones album that was a mixture of covers and original material. In 1965 the Stones still considered themselves primarily a singles band so much of their attention was still being focused on those three of four single releases a year. That's not to say 'Out Of Our Heads' is not a good album - it does have much to offer but it's rather an uneven album in many ways particuarly when compared with the albums that followed.

Much like the Stones debut album 'The Rolling Stones' much of 'Out Of Our Heads' displays the rock 'n' roll vitality and occasional blues sound which had always been a striking feature of their early style. However, 'Out Of Our Heads' also displays a strong soul element which the Stones managed to incorporate very well into their rock 'n' roll grooves.

'She Said Yeah', the opening track really does reflect the Stones fidelity as hard edged purveyors of the rock 'n' roll sound. Its manic sound is a perfect early example of their raw energy. 'Mercy, Mercy' and 'Hitch Hike' also have that hard edged rock 'n' roll sound but there's also an element of soul, too. 'Good Times' has a softer soul sound. The Stones also include a more typical Chuck Berry cover 'Talkin' 'Bout You' which is perhaps not their most inspiring take on a Chuck Berry song and also 'Cry To Me' and 'Oh Baby (We Got A Good Thing Goin') which are good if not particuarly arresting.

Their own songs 'Gotta Get Away', 'Heart Of Stone' and 'I'm Free' continue the soul theme and if these songs aren't quite Stones classics they do display a degree of promise for things to come. The Stones other original 'The Under Assistant West Coast Promotion Man' is an effective blues influenced song.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Bernard J. Ryan on 1 Dec. 2010
Format: Audio CD
Which album are Amazon advertising here?? The US or UK version of this album?? Both were different.

The American cover sleeve is on display, but the UK track listing is advertised.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rickyroogar on 14 Aug. 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Excellent value for money as you get both versions of the album for the price of one. The free auto rip version has some totally totally different tracks on it to the cd version I received which states on its cover its the UK version so I assume the auto rip version I downloaded must be the US version.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jacque on 18 July 2010
Format: Audio CD
The first time I heard this album was on a mono version back in 1966. I had bought it second-hand from a friend and it quickly became one of my favourite LPs.

This album has the rawness of early Stones albums, with some classic tracks that sound as fresh today as they did back then, with one caveat - the digital re-mastering has shone new light on the excellent production.

I remember lending the LP to someone back in the 1970's and never saw it again (lessons to be learnt). It was only because my favourite track on the album 'The Underassistant West Coast Promotion Man' came into my head one day recently after thirty-odd years(who knows how the Human brain works sometimes), that I searched the Internet and found this re-mastered album at Amazon. There are several versions of this album, but for me it had to be the one with the cover used on the LP I acquired in 1966.

There's not a track on this album that I dislike, 'Mercy Mercy' running second place favourite for me as it has a solid drum line throughout, demonstrating Charlie Watts skills and excellent guitar work. If you want to hear early Stones tracks at their best, you won't be disappointed by this album
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 6 Dec. 2005
Format: Audio CD
This really is a great album which doesnt get the credit it deserves, there isnt a duff track on it and I think it's better than the UK version. Of particular note is the track The Spider And The Fly, which is said to have been a favourite of the Yorkshire Ripper Peter Sutcliffe back in the day. It's a good song and I believe this is the only album you'll find it on.
But all these tracks are good, and the sound quality of the remaster is top notch, recommended.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By S. Muzyka on 22 Nov. 2009
Format: Audio CD
The Stones third U.K. LP crackles with raw energy. Almost too raw in places. The frenetic opener 'She Said Yeah' is the kind of performance that a modern-day band just wouldn't get away with. A coruscating,one-and-a-half-minute thrash that is so ramshackle musically it should be awful (all the band seem to be playing at a different tempo to each other) but succeeds through sheer energy. In fact, it could be the first 'Punk' song ever made. The next two songs show the wildly varying recording quality of early Stones material. 'Mercy Mercy' sounds fabulous,with rumbling bass, trebly,stinging guitars and drums and crisp vocals. 'Hitch Hike' which follows, is the complete opposite and sounds like it was recorded underwater (an unfortunate feature of many Stones tracks recorded at RCA Studios). Johnny Marr,incidentally, copied the staccato intro of 'Hitch Hike' for the Smiths masterpiece 'There Is A Light That Never Goes Out'. The album has many other highlights including 'That's How Strong My Love Is' which features one of Jaggers best ever vocal performances. There's also an excellent cover of Sam Cookes 'Good Times'. The languid 'Gotta Get Away' whose simple tune masks a lyric full of desperation, the brilliant 'Heart Of Stone' (another acidic Jagger lyric) and the humourous 'The Under Assistant West Coast Promotion Man', written about George Sherlock, who amused the band by accompanying them on a tour and seemingly doing nothing the whole time. The closing track is 'I'm Free' which was very popular with audiences at the time. Presumably, the live renditions were far better than the lugubrious studio version, which is stiff,lifeless and totally lacking in energy. Charlie Watts makes such a huge ricket at one point that the whole song almost lurches to a stop.Read more ›
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