Out Of America: A Black Man Confronts Africa and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Out of America: a Black Man Confronts Africa (Harvest Book) Paperback – 1 Jul 1998


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 1 Jul 1998
£12.96 £0.01


Product details

  • Paperback: 266 pages
  • Publisher: Thomson Learning; 1st Harvest Ed edition (1 July 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0156005832
  • ISBN-13: 978-0156005838
  • Product Dimensions: 20.2 x 13.5 x 1.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,732,069 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

Keith B. Richburg is the New York bureau chief for the Washington Post. In 1993 he won the National Association of Black Journalists’ International Reporting Award, and the following year he won the George Polk Memorial Award for foreign reporting and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He lives in Washington, D.C.
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
"WHAT'S THAT SMELL?" I asked. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 10 Jun 1999
Format: Hardcover
I have just finished reading Out of America, and it really made me think. I have read many of the reviews posted for this book, and I find good points about the book in many of them. I think Keith Richburg has done us a great service by writing this book, and being honest about how he feels about Africa and his heritage. It is his honesty I think that I admire most, even more so than his obvious writing ability. The message that he brings, that of not being African but American, may not be the popular or politically correct view, but it is how he honestly feels, and his opinion should be respected and his views taken into account as much as anyone's. This book is free speech taken to its higher ideals, expressing views that may not always be akin to those of everyone else, but that are worthy of being expressed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 17 July 2001
Format: Hardcover
This book is, in my opinion, a must for every African. It contains painfully and frighteningly accurate detail about the desolate state of affairs in some of our countries. Answers to most of the unanswered questions posed in this book can be found in Axelle Kabou's "weder arm noch ohnmächtig" (unfortunately only available in French and German; the title translated from German would sound something like "neither poor nor powerless" referring to the idea that we Africans, contrary to what most Africans are made to believe, are primarily responsible for the state of our nations and we have the power to change things. I definitely will recommend Kabou's book to anyone who understands German or French. The language is pretty solid, by the way). Let us try to prove all the pessimists wrong.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 July 1997
Format: Hardcover
Out of America is symbolic of the best we expect from our news reporters; yet rarely receive. Mr Richburg examines the plight of present day Africa and in doing so opens the festering wound of conflicting emotions that we as American have toward the region. In writing this book, the author has shown more courage and conviction to his believes, and the realities of the modern world, than every "popular tele-journalist and popular reporter of the past three decades combined. The reality of the sub-saharan Africa that Mr Richburg viewed, and comments on, is one that we, sitting in our easy chairs around the television, could hardly bring ourselves to face. At the same time, his insight into the views of American society and stereotype force us to look at ourselves with the unabashed nakedness of a Rwandan child caught in the middle of the latest tribal war. This work is not for the weak or the racist of any race, color, or creed. Out of America should be required reading for all government officials, military leaders, and social workers trying to impose "the white man's burden", and "the black man's struggle" on the rest of the world. This reviewer was both deeply moved, and deeply grateful for the publication of this work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 25 April 1999
Format: Hardcover
A good book, I think, is one that makes you think and question beyond its pages. Keith Richburg's Out of America led me to examine my feelings about my "homeland," Ireland, a country many of my ancestors left during the Famine. Like Richburg, I expected to feel a bond - a semi-mystical one - with the contemporary Irish, and in fact I did during two vacation visits. Then I spent some time working on a project with British and Irish colleagues in rural Ireland and discovered, rather to my dismay, that I considerably more in common with the "enemy" British (and with urban Dubliners) than I did with Irish country people, who often seemed naive, a bit cruel, and superstitious.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 Dec 1997
Format: Hardcover
No dissembling, please: AFRICANS (and I am partly one by attempted adoption) ARE UNCIVILISED!
This is what this book, which I've just finished reading, seems to be saying in a nutshell, I feel. That fat sentence alone would make most Western folk ban it outright into the racist pissoir. Before they found out that Keith Richburg is a well-read black Pulitzer Prize nominee.
Read the book (please do!), and it will quickly become clear that just that, his colour, his perceived kinship with most Africans IS the main theme of the book. Or a little less simply: How that contrasts with the cultural and ethical dissonance he feels with most of the Africans he meets, with the African worlds he experiences, over his 3 years on the continent as bureau chief of a Washington newspaper.
In these years he hunts crises, and sees and documents terrible extremes of inhumanity and short-sightedness. I find especially the described racism among Africans hard to deal with, although it is expounded very credibly; I didn't know it was the root cause of the Rwanda massacres. The phrase "in Africa you don't count the bodies" punctuates almost every chapter.
I lived at the tip of this continent for many years. Probably a lot more naive than now, what I absorbed on the negative / pain side from my few closer encounters with native Africans gels with what Richburg describes: Hopelessness or resignation; tiredness at the stubborn cyclopic views of whites; hardness of the soul, devil-may-careness of the body and the tongue. And poverty, helplessness, hunger. Sure.
But what of the positive side? Did Richburg never meet content Africans, cool, clever, fast, dedicated, far-sighted Africans who were making life work for them without ripping off everybody else?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback