Buy Used
£2.82
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Over 2 million items sold. Fast dispatch and delivery. Excellent Customer Feedback. Most items will be dispatched the same or the next working day.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 5 images

Origins: Human Evolution Revealed Hardcover – 4 Oct 2010

4 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£46.83 £2.82

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Mitchell Beazley (4 Oct. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1845334744
  • ISBN-13: 978-1845334741
  • Product Dimensions: 25.4 x 3.2 x 29.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 879,356 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Book Description

This book will combine an expert author with the best facial reconstructions by renowned paleo artist John Gurche, a consultant to National Geographic, The Smithsonian and Spielberg's Jurassic Park Our Evolution book takes all life as its subject; with a separate book we can concentrate on the evolution of humans - for many people the stars of the show. The upsurge of creationism in the US - inevitably focusing on trying to prove that humans aren't descended from apes - guarantees this subject will always be newsworthy. Interest in our origins continues to grow - as science progresses we are tracing our origins further and further back. This is the ultimate in tracing your family tree. The subject will be given a boost by the 2009 anniversary of the Darwin's Origin of Species and the BBC's "Year of Science" in 2010

About the Author

Dr Douglas Palmer is a science writer and lecturer. His books include The Neanderthal, which accompanied the acclaimed Channel 4 series, Earth Time, The Atlas of the Prehistoric World and Prehistoric Past Revealed (MB). He is a contributor to a variety of publications including New Scientist, Science and BBC Wildlife Magazine. He is currently working on Evolution for Mitchell Beazley (2009).


Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
On the whole, I was very pleased by this book. Although it is written for a lay audience, it is clear that the author is familiar with some of the key theoretical debates. He is able to convey them well, striking a good balance between being too simple and too complex. It is the sort of book that makes you want to read more deeply into many of the topics raised. I particularly liked the way he weaved in details about some of the key scientists involved and the relationships between them. I knocked a star off my rating for some needless repetition and for far too many minor presentational mistakes, such as wrong dates and names. These may well be proof-reading errors, but there are too many of them. One expects higher presentational standards for a big introductory book such as this. On thing that particularly grated with me was that the 3D models of the various species were very impressive until we get to ourselves, Homo Sapiens, when the model was clearly done in a different style. The bizarre result is that Homo Heidelbergensis, Homo Floresiensis and Homo Neanderthalensis all look more recognisably human than the waxy, demonic-eyed Homo Sapiens.

However, that shouldn't detract from the many merits of the book. I was glad I had read it and will, I am sure, return to it profitably many times in the future. It is rich in detail and a very good learning resource.
Comment 3 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Quality of the book was in near mint, but the accuracy of some scientific aspects left something to be desired...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa047781c) out of 5 stars 10 reviews
34 of 35 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa033dd98) out of 5 stars Well done overview 26 Feb. 2011
By Roald Euller - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Origins: Human Evolution Revealed is a large format "coffee table" style overview of the current scientific thinking with respect to human evolution. There are many colored photographs, diagrams and maps. A striking reconstruction of Lucy peers out from the dust jacket. Origins is an introduction, aimed at a general audience. The many illustrations make it highly accessible. Nonetheless, the text is not "dumbed down" and packs in considerable information. Origins need not be read as a narrative, in fact each chapter can be read as a "stand alone" and there is some repetition across chapters.

The book is divided into two sections, the first consisting of a series of short (10-15 page) chapters each focusing on a specific early hominid species. Starting with Proconsul africanus (about 18 million years ago) through Australopithecus, Homo habilis, Homo erectus, Homo neanderthalensis, and ultimately Homo sapiens, each chapter describes circumstances surrounding the initial and subsequent finds, the resulting scientific debate and discussion, and our current thinking with respect to where each species fits in the primate evolutionary "bush". Provided are brief sketches of the key scientific figures associated with each species (e.g. - the Leakey's). John Gurche contributed interesting artistic reconstructions of each species' appearance, reflecting current thinking.

The second section focuses on the global migration of Homo sapiens and his predecessors, tracing multiple waves of migration from Africa throughout the world. Separate chapters focus on the dispersion from Africa, and the migrations into Europe, Australasia, and the Americas. There are also chapters on art and tool making. These latter are understandably limited given that they must cover vastly complicated subjects in just a few pages. This section too is well supported with maps and photographs.

I had a few negative impressions: First, the aerial overview maps illustrating key archeological sites were not particularly helpful. Second, as noted above, the sections on art, tool making, and climate change (1 page plus a diagram!) are disappointingly sketchy. Finally, there is no bibliography or suggestions for further reading, something such a lavish overview cries out for. Overall, Origins is a well done introduction to human evolution. Four stars.
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa033d5e8) out of 5 stars A Fantastic Survey of Our Origins 17 May 2011
By Gianni - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book provides a beautifully illustrated thoughtful and sympathetic treatment of our most significant prehuman, near human and direct human anticessors. Dr Palmer provides a brief panoramic overview of the scope of the text and then dives deep into the details of the focus species. In the first part of the book:Meet the Ancestors, he lays out the latest findings from the various disciplines and provides a vivid profile of each of his subjects. In the second part: The Human Odyssey, he starts with our dispersion from Africa and traces the uniquely human evolution of art, sophisticated tool making,and weaponry.

One comes away with a sense of close familiarity and connectedness with our distant past and an appreciation for the multifaceted developments which make us so unique in our humanity.

This book was a thoroughly enjoyable and very enlightening read
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa033d4ec) out of 5 stars A BEAUTIFUL PHOTO BOOK OF EVOLUTION 22 Jun. 2013
By Robert Williams - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Following the authoratative works of Paul Bahn and Randall White, author Doughlas Palmer gives us yet another wonderful coffee table book about the origins of humans. It is 9 1/2 x 11 1/2 and is packed with dozens of full page color photographs depicting our ancestors from Proconsul Africanus to Homo Sapiens. After a brief introduction, in part one 13 species are described in full detail in text and in photos giving us an overall view of what is known about each species. Art, tools, Food, fire and shelter are also discussed.

In part two, Palmer traces our foot steps out of Africa and dispersal into the rest of the world. Many maps and charts are provided. He then explores the origins of art, and the tools that evolved into weapons. There are some fine photographic examples of paleolithic cave art, bead and shell art, tools and musical instruments.

I especially liked the color artistic representations of what these creatures may have looked like in real life. Putting a face on them somehow makes them seem more real than the study alone of fossil bones and skulls of these hominids. Given this, Homo Neanderthalensis men looked more like us than not. It is likely too that (because of the climate ) he had fair skin.

Overall, Palmer has done a masterful job presenting ancient man to us on a lay man's palate. One cannot hope to come away from this tome without a more incitefull view of the origins, evolution and advancing culture of our species. Any student of paleoarchaeology would benefit from having a copy of the book in his library.
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa0283300) out of 5 stars Wonderful, easy to understand book on human evolution. 8 Mar. 2012
By Potsmokindino - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
If you want to learn more about the origins of the human species and our extinct relatives without spending too much time and energy trying to understand a strictly academic read, this is the book for you.

It has wonderful artwork by renown paleoartist, John Gurche, and also has tons of information from the vigorous research done by the author, Douglas Palmer, so you will definitely learn a thing or two about where we came from as a species and how we possibly migrated out of the African continent to become one of the most dominant species on the planet. You will become acquainted with the various members of our unique offshoot of the great ape family; from the Neanderthals of ice age Europe and the Middle East, to the diminutive Indonesian Hobbits.

For me, I'm a very visual individual and I love looking at pictures and great artwork (as I'm an illustration student who loves his prehistoric animals),and this book certainly delivers. From pencils sketches to immensely detailed sculptures (like the one on the cover), you will not be disappointed. Crisp and gorgeous pictures are also provided of the, fossils, localities and countries where these creatures were discovered.

The only fault I can find with this book is its size and weight. It's best read sitting down.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa032d9fc) out of 5 stars amazing journey through the human family tree 13 April 2013
By dennis - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
a fascinating journey through the Human family tree. Amazing illustrations and real to life artists' recreations of early Hominids. it's a 'can't help picking it up' type book.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Look for similar items by category


Feedback