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Orff; Bird; Reed - Wind Band Music [CD]

Orff/Bird/Reed Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: 5.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
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Product details

  • Audio CD (28 Aug 2006)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Naxos
  • ASIN: B000GNOHNW
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 500,534 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Carmina Burana Suite, "Cantiones profanae" (arr. for concert band): I. O Fortuna, velut Luna (Oh Fortune, variable as the moon)Harlan D. Parker 2:190.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Carmina Burana Suite, "Cantiones profanae" (arr. for concert band): II. Fortune plango vulnera (I lament Fortune's blows)Harlan D. Parker 2:030.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Carmina Burana Suite, "Cantiones profanae" (arr. for concert band): III. Ecce gratum (Behold the Spring)Harlan D. Parker 2:530.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Carmina Burana Suite, "Cantiones profanae" (arr. for concert band): IV. Tanz: Uf dem anger (Dance: On the lawn)Harlan D. Parker 1:500.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Carmina Burana Suite, "Cantiones profanae" (arr. for concert band): V. Floret silva nobilis (The noble forest)Harlan D. Parker 2:030.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Carmina Burana Suite, "Cantiones profanae" (arr. for concert band): VI. Were diu werlt alle min (Were the world all mine)Harlan D. Parker0:550.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Carmina Burana Suite, "Cantiones profanae" (arr. for concert band): VII. Amor volat undique (The Goddess of Love flies everywhere)Harlan D. Parker 3:280.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Carmina Burana Suite, "Cantiones Profanae" (Arr. For Concert Band): VIII. Ego Sum Abbas (I Am The Abbot)Harlan D. Parker 1:570.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Carmina Burana Suite, "Cantiones profanae" (arr. for concert band): IX. In taberna quando sumus (When we are in the tavern)Harlan D. Parker 3:000.69  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Carmina Burana Suite, "Cantiones profanae" (arr. for concert band): X. In trutina (I am suspended between love and chastity)Harlan D. Parker 2:120.69  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Carmina Burana Suite, "Cantiones profanae" (arr. for concert band): XI. Dulcissime (Sweetest boy)Harlan D. Parker0:360.69  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Carmina Burana Suite, "Cantiones profanae" (arr. for concert band): XII. Ave, formosissima (Hail to thee, most beautiful)Harlan D. Parker 1:390.69  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Carmina Burana Suite, "Cantiones Profanae" (Arr. For Concert Band): XIII. Fortuna, Imperatrix Mundi (Fortune, Empress Of The World)Harlan D. Parker 2:260.69  Buy MP3 
Listen14. Serenade, Op. 40 (arr. G. Schuller): I. Allegro moderatoHarlan D. Parker 6:140.69  Buy MP3 
Listen15. Serenade, Op. 40 (arr. G. Schuller): II. AdagioHarlan D. Parker 5:470.69  Buy MP3 
Listen16. Serenade, Op. 40 (arr. G. Schuller): III. Allegro assaiHarlan D. Parker 6:200.69  Buy MP3 
Listen17. Serenade, Op. 40 (arr. G. Schuller): IV. Allegro energicoHarlan D. Parker 5:500.69  Buy MP3 
Listen18. La Fiesta Mexicana: I. Prelude and Aztec DanceHarlan D. Parker 8:58Album Only
Listen19. La Fiesta Mexicana: II. MassHarlan D. Parker 7:090.69  Buy MP3 
Listen20. La Fiesta Mexicana: III. CarnivalHarlan D. Parker 6:250.69  Buy MP3 


Product Description

Orff : Carmina Burana - Bird : Sérénade pour instruments à vent op.40 - Reed : La Fiesta Mexicana / The Peabody Conservatory Wind Ensemble, dir. Harlan D.Parker

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Three Four-Letter Composers 16 Sep 2006
By J Scott Morrison HALL OF FAME TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
No, I don't mean they used four-letter words. I'm just remarking on the strange fact that each of these American composers has a four-letter last name, a nice kind of symmetry.

Probably for most buyers the big attraction here will be the suite taken from Carl Orff's 'Carmina Burana' but for me it was the least attractive thing on the CD. Although it is expertly done and expertly played, as well as expertly recorded, I cannot, I'm sorry to admit, hear this music without supplying in my mind's ear the vocal parts of the score, missing in this all-instrumental version. After all the original requires vocal soloists and three choirs. That (rather large for me) quibble aside, this is a good performance of the suite as arranged by John Krance. The arrangement shortens the original partly by eliminating lots of Orff's repeats, appropriate in a non-vocal version.

The big discovery here, though, is the delectable Wind Serenade, Op. 40 of the all-but-forgotten Arthur Bird. He was born in Belmont, Massachusetts in 1856, had his initial instruction in music from his father and uncle who were hymn composers and arrangers. He was sent in his teens to Berlin where he studied for several years, eventually becoming a friend and acolyte of Franz Liszt. He returned briefly to North American (Halifax, Nova Scotia) and then moved back to Berlin permanently where he married a rich widow, living in a palace and maintaining a sumptuous downtown Berlin apartment. He wrote an opera, 'Daphne', and is reputed to be the first American to write music for a major ballet, 'Rübezahl.' He wrote an early wind octet for the famous French flute virtuoso, Paul Taffanel, but that is not the work heard here. The notes for this release are virtually non-existent and they get the instrumentation wrong.
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Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  5 reviews
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Three Four-Letter Composers 16 Sep 2006
By J Scott Morrison - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
No, I don't mean they used four-letter words. I'm just remarking on the strange fact that each of these composers has a four-letter last name -- Orff, Bird, Reed -- a nice kind of symmetry.

Probably for most buyers the big attraction here will be the suite taken from Carl Orff's 'Carmina Burana' but for me it was the least attractive thing on the CD. Although it is expertly done and expertly played, as well as expertly recorded, I cannot, I'm sorry to admit, hear this music without supplying in my mind's ear the vocal parts of the score, missing in this all-instrumental version. After all the original requires vocal soloists and three choirs. That (rather large for me) quibble aside, this is a good performance of the suite as arranged by John Krance. The arrangement shortens the original partly by eliminating lots of Orff's repeats, appropriate in a non-vocal version.

The big discovery here, though, is the delectable Wind Serenade, Op. 40 of the all-but-forgotten Arthur Bird. He was born in Belmont, Massachusetts in 1856, had his initial instruction in music from his father and uncle who were hymn composers and arrangers. He was sent in his teens to Berlin where he studied for several years, eventually becoming a friend and acolyte of Franz Liszt. He returned briefly to North American (Halifax, Nova Scotia) and then moved back to Berlin permanently where he married a rich widow, living in a palace and maintaining a sumptuous downtown Berlin apartment. He wrote an opera, 'Daphne', and is reputed to be the first American to write music for a major ballet, 'Rübezahl.' He wrote an early wind octet for the famous French flute virtuoso, Paul Taffanel, but that is not the work heard here. The notes for this release are virtually non-existent and they get the instrumentation wrong. My ears tell me that this work is for ten winds -- two each of flutes, oboes, clarinets, bassoons and horns. The work is in four movements and lasts a little more than twenty-four minutes. It is exceedingly tuneful, has a skillful contrapuntal texture for much of its length, is harmonically very much of the late 19th-century, reminding me at times of chamber works for wind by Richard Strauss or Ludwig Thuille. In my opinion, this work is worthy of frequent presentation. It is a truly superior work of its kind. And the Peabody wind players do a heckuva job here. I've now listened to the work four times and keep discovering new delights.

Much better known, at least in the band world, is the music of the now-96-year-old H. Owen Reed, the long-time professor of composition at Michigan State University and a doyen of wind band music in America. 'La Fiesta Mexicana' is a wind symphony based on Mexican folksongs and from its premiere in the mid-1950s by the US Marine Band, for whom it was written, it has been played literally hundreds of times by wind ensembles all over the world. It has also served as music for a ballet. It is notable for its rhythmic complexity (especially in the third movement), creative use of brass and percussion, and a hieratic complexion unexpectedly compatible with echoes of mariachi music. I counted six other recordings of the work available here at Amazon.com. I know those conducted by renowned band conductors Frederick Fennell and Eugene Corporon and the present recording deserves to stand in their company. This is a sizzling account of the lovable work.

I am giving this recording five stars even though I was less than sold by the wind ensemble arrangement of 'Carmina Burana.' That's because I suspect that others will love it and am willing to concede that my response may be idiosyncratic.

Scott Morrison
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Carmina, the winds expound! 12 Jan 2007
By C. Bryan - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Hey, you love CB as much as I do? For winds, this is special; and this orch. does a great job - without repetition (essential in vocal form) or some of the passages that cannot transcend the medium. Wonderful!!! A pleasure to hear and short enough for those who know every note by heart. Naxos never broke your wallet either; a bargain, my friend. Really four and 7/10 stars!
5.0 out of 5 stars Carmina 6 Aug 2013
By JMiles - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I played Carmina for band this year, and this is exactly the recording I was looking for! Great job by the Peabody Conservatory!
4.0 out of 5 stars Something of a novelty, but fun 26 Mar 2013
By John J. Puccio - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
My first thought before listening to this disc was how the already rowdy Carmina Burana by Carl Orff (1895-1982) would sound played by an all-wind band, the vocal parts revised for instruments (arranged for concert band). I mean, Orff's twentieth-century updating of medieval songs normally requires a full orchestra, several choruses, and a host of soloists. Would a wind ensemble do it justice or just inflate its coarseness? I'm pleased to report that Harlan Parker and his seventy-odd Peabody Conservatory players do no harm to the piece and in most ways create a new and engaging rendition of an old favorite. Something of a novelty, perhaps, but fun.

John J. Puccio
Classical Candor
2 of 30 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The vocal part is totally missing from this Carmina Burana Suite 21 Nov 2006
By a Mountaineer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
The vocal part is totally missing from this Carmina Burana Suite. When I bought it, I was not paying attention. What a mistake! Can you imagine Beethoven's Ninth Symphany without the vocal part?
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