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Orchestra: The LSO: A Century of Triumphs and Turbulence Paperback – 20 Jan 2005


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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (20 Jan. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 057121584X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571215843
  • Product Dimensions: 12.6 x 2.2 x 19.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 481,964 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Book Description

Orchestra: The LSO: A Century of Triumphs and Turbulence by Richard Morrison is a landmark celebration of one of the most acclaimed orchestras in the world.

About the Author

Richard Morrison is chief music critic of The Times and writes a wide-ranging weekly column on cultural and social matters, which is noted for its humour and passion. From 1989 to 1999 he also edited the paper's arts pages. He is a music graduate of Cambridge University and former orchestral trombonist and organist.He was taken to his first London Symphony Orchestra concert in 1960, aged five, and wrote his first professional review of the orchestra 16 years later. Since then he has heard the orchestra perform under most of the world's top conductors.

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By CarolynHeather on 5 Dec. 2010
Format: Paperback
This book is a fantastic read for anyone with a passing interest in the history of not only the LSO orchestra, but also British classical music and arts culture in the last 100 years or so. It is a witty and opinionated book written with a light touch which is full of entertaining anecdotes, journalistic analysis and personal testimony from LSO players, conductors and management past and present. It covers the ground of the history of the orchestra, but concentrates most on the pivotal moments and the best stories setting them neatly in the music scene of London, the rest of the UK, Europe and America. Did you know that the LSO narrowly missed being on the Titanic, changing their tickets only at the last moment? I particularly enjoyed the chapters on the 70s and 80s which saw the orchestra veering from the heights of artistic brilliance to near financial ruin - often at the same time. I loved reading about the essentially English quality of the players - the 'rock n roll' classical musicians who ran their orchestra in their way with maverick and often dazzlingly brilliant flare. A great read.
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By Bacchus TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 29 Dec. 2014
Format: Paperback
The LSO was the first professional orchestra I ever heard. Andre Previn came to our town and conducted a number of works in 1975. I was at primary school at the time and I think it all went over my head. However, I knew that Previn was a big celebrity, especially when I saw his name on various soundtrack LPs (Porgy and Bess, My Fair Lady and Jesus Christ Superstar) that I preferred listening to, I thought he was everywhere.

Anyway, back to the LSO. Anyone watching a professional orchestra like the LSO and seeing the 1,000s of recordings they have made would think that an orchestra is a permanent organisation. Reading this book, you will realise that it is anything but. Richard Morrison tells the story of this orchestra.

It famously began in the Edwardian era in 1904 at a time when orchestral players found as much work playing in theatre bands as they did in permanent 'classical' orchestras. This work was often better paid and Henry Wood, Britain's leading conductor of the Queens Hall Orchestra started to feel a little aggrieved at having a different bunch of players at performance than he had in rehearsal (quite justifiably). The management of the orchestra announced that in future, no member of the orchestra would be permitted to find a deputy. The potential loss of valuable extra income caused a large number of members of the Queens Hall Orchestra to form their own orchestra in which the players were now members and shareholders rather than employees. The London Symphony Orchestra was born.

However, they strove for the highest standards and employed the finest European conductors, like Hans Richter and Artur Nikisch.
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